Thesis Thursday: Thomas Hoe

On the third Thursday of every month, we speak to a recent graduate about their thesis and their studies. This month’s guest is Dr Thomas Hoe who has a PhD from University College London. If you would like to suggest a candidate for an upcoming Thesis Thursday, get in touch.

Title
Essays on the economics of health care provision
Supervisors
Richard Blundell, Orazio Attanasio
Repository link
http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/10048627/

What data do you use in your analyses and what are your main analytical methods?

I use data from the English National Health Service (NHS). One of the great features of the NHS is the centralized data it collects, with the Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES) containing information on every public hospital visit in England.

In my thesis, I primarily use two empirical approaches. In my work on trauma and orthopaedic departments, I exploit the fact that the number of emergency trauma admissions to hospital each day is random. This randomness allows me to conduct a quasi-experiment to assess how hospitals perform when they are more or less busy.

The second approach I use, in my work on emergency departments with Jonathan Gruber and George Stoye, is based on bunching techniques that originated in the tax literature (Chetty et al, 2013; Kleven and Waseem, 2013; Saez, 2010). These techniques use interpolation to infer how discontinuities in incentive schemes affect outcomes. We apply and extend these techniques to evaluate the impact of the ‘4-hour target’ in English emergency departments.

How did you characterise and measure quality in your research?

Measuring the quality of health care outcomes is always a challenge in empirical research. Since my research primarily relies on administrative data from HES, I use the patient outcomes that can be directly constructed from this data: in-hospital mortality, and unplanned readmission.

Mortality is, of course, an outcome that is widely used, and offers an unambiguous interpretation. Readmission, on the other hand, is an outcome that has gained more acceptance as a measure of quality in recent years, particularly following the implementation of readmission penalties in the UK and the US.

What is ‘crowding’, and how can it affect the quality of care?

I use the term crowding to refer, in a fairly general sense, to how busy a hospital is. This could mean that the hospital is physically very crowded, with lots of patients in close proximity to one another, or that the number of patients outstrips the available resources.

In practice, I evaluate how crowding affects quality of care by comparing hospital performance and patient outcomes on days when hospitals deal with different levels of admissions (due to random spikes in the number of trauma admissions). I find that hospitals respond by not only cancelling some planned admissions, such as elective hip and knee replacements, but also discharge existing patients sooner. For these discharged patients, the shorter-than-otherwise stay in the hospital is associated with poorer health outcomes for patients, most notably an increase in subsequent hospital visits (unplanned readmissions).

How might incentives faced by hospitals lead to negative consequences?

One of the strongest incentives faced by public hospitals in England is to meet the government-set waiting time target for elective care. This target has been very successful at reducing wait times. In doing so, however, it may have contributed to hospitals shortening patient stays and increasing patient admissions.

My research shows that shorter hospitals stays, in turn, can lead to increases in unplanned readmissions. Setting strong wait time targets, then, is in effect trading off shorter waits (from which patients benefit) with crowding effects (which may harm patients).

Your research highlights the importance of time in the hospital production process. How does this play out?

I look at this from three dimensions, each a separate part of a patient’s journey through hospital.

The first two relate to waiting for treatment. For elective patients, this means waiting for an appointment, and previous work has shown that patients attach significant value to reductions in these wait times. I show that trauma and orthopaedic patients would be better off with further wait time reductions, even if that leads to more crowding.

Emergency patients, in contrast, wait for treatment while physically in a hospital emergency department. I show that these waiting times can be very harmful and that by shortening these wait times we can actually save lives.

The third dimension relates to how long a patient spends in hospital recovering from surgery. I show that, at least on the margin of care for trauma and orthopaedic patients, an additional day in hospital has tangible benefits in terms of reducing the likelihood of experiencing an unplanned readmission.

How could your findings be practically employed in the NHS to improve productivity?

I would highlight two areas of my research that speak directly to the policy debate about NHS productivity.

First, while the wait time targets for elective care may have led to some crowding problems and subsequently more readmissions, the net benefit of these targets to trauma and orthopaedic patients is positive. Second, the wait time target for emergency departments also appears to have benefited patients: it saved lives at a reasonably cost-effective rate.

From the perspective of patients, therefore, I would argue these policies have been relatively successful and should be maintained.

Meeting round-up: CINCH Academy 2018

On 18-23 June, researchers, coming from Australia, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom, were gathered together at the annual CINCH summer school, an academic program for early stage researchers in health economics. The fifth CINCH Academy was held in Essen, Germany, by one of Germany’s leading health economics centres – CINCH. The institute brings together the region’s most notable health economics institutions: RWI – Leibniz Institute for Economic Research, the Faculty of Economics and Business Administration at the University of Duisburg-Essen, and the Institute for Competition Economics (DICE) at the Heinrich-Heine-University in Düsseldorf.

This year the focus of the Academy was hospital economics and mental health. On the first days of the event, Luigi Siciliani (University of York) gave a very informative block of lectures on hospital competition as well as currently often-debated quality of health care, waiting times and patient’s choice. To strengthen the learning process, after each topic, participants were requested to answer a set of questions and engaged in discussions that helped to better understand the lecture materials. After a productive first block of lectures, Richard G. Frank (Harvard University) provided a comprehensive insight into the economics of mental health and emphasized the distinguishing marks of topics in mental health such as salient features of mental illness, the role of government, mental health illness protection and mental health policy. Encouraged by the lecturer and with a high interest, each participant took part in the discussion and shared their knowledge about specific situations and handlings in their home countries.

In addition to the educational material, each participant had an opportunity to present his or her current research topic and be discussed by another participant. The large range of topics, such as the influence of crime on residents’ mental wellbeing, the influence of unpaid care on formal care utilization and the impact of increased hospital expenditures on population mortality, created a very interactive atmosphere for discussions. Senior researcher Daniel Howdon (University of Leeds) chaired the paper session and gave additional helpful comments for each presenter.

Apart from an interesting academic program, the summer school further fostered an interaction between participants in several social activities organized by the CINCH team. Besides several dinners after intensive days, participants had a chance to participate in a specially organized city tour in Essen and visit the Zollverein Coal Mine Industrial Complex (Zeche Zollverein) that is inscribed into the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites. The large industrial monument is often named as the cultural heart of the Ruhr Area. After a guided tour through the complex, all participants once again gathered to have a dinner at a traditional restaurant of this region. Social activities not only allowed to further discuss topics of the lectures but also to share different personal experiences about pursuing a doctoral degree in different countries and about other daily interests for each early-stage researcher such as intensive learning, travelling to conferences, obtaining datasets, etc.

On the last day of the summer school, organizers announced the Best Paper Award, that was awarded to Elizabeth Lemmon (University of Stirling) for her research paper “Utilisation of personal care services in Scotland: the influence of unpaid carers”. Besides the financial reward, her work will be published in the CINCH Working Paper Series.

CINCH Academy was an excellent opportunity to deepen the knowledge and insights in hospital and mental health economics. Our special thanks goes to lecturers, Luigi Siciliani and Richard G. Frank, to paper sessions chair Daniel Howdon, as well as to the great organizational team Christoph Kronenberg and Annika Jäschke.

Credit

 

Harold Hastings’s journal round-up for 16th July 2018

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Legal origins and female HIV. American Economic Review [RePEc] Published 13th June 2018

I made this somewhat unusual choice because the author Siwan Anderson draws an important connection between the economic and legal status of women across sub-Saharan Africa and the incidence of HIV. As summarized in the American Economic Review feature Empowering women, improving health, “Over half of all people living with HIV are women. Of all HIV-positive women, 80 percent live in Sub-Saharan Africa.” Anderson hypothesizes that regional differences in female property rights (lower in common law eastern and southern Africa than in civil law central Africa) may explain significantly higher HIV incidence in eastern and southern African women, especially relative to eastern and southern African men. Health economists have long studied how economic status affects access to health care; Anderson presents an important and interesting complementary argument for how economic (and legal) status affects health. In particular, improved legal status and access to legal aid may be a key step in improving women’s health.

Addressing generic-drug market failures — the case for establishing a nonprofit manufacturer. The New England Journal of Medicine [PubMed] Published 17th May 2018

We have recently seen shortages in many generic drugs, including generic injectables used in emergency, trauma and other hospital medicine. In many cases, there is only a single supplier, who can dramatically increase prices. One might expect others to enter the market in this case. However, frequently significant fixed start-up costs pose a barrier to entry and the single supplier, who has already made and in many cases paid for the start-up investment, can drastically reduce prices to make it difficult for the competition to cover these costs. Thus there is little incentive to enter a potentially low-profit market. The authors propose establishing a nonprofit manufacturer, essentially a pharmaceutical counterpart to a variety of national and nonprofit health systems, as a novel and a potentially successful way to address this issue.

An incomplete prescription: President Trump’s plan to address high drug prices. JAMA [PubMed] Published 19th June 2018

The prices of many drugs are significantly higher in the United States than in much of the rest of the developed world. President Trump proposes some market actions such as granting Medicare negotiating power; but the authors find these insufficient, making two interesting additional proposals. First, since much pharmaceutical development derives from NIH funded research (including chimeric antigen receptor T-cell immunotherapies which may cost $400,000 US per dose), the authors argue that the NIH and academic institutions could require US prices based upon independent valuations or not to exceed those in other industrialized countries. The authors also suggest authorizing imports where there is adequate regulation as a further mechanism for controlling drug prices; in my opinion a natural free-trade position. The pricing of pharmaceuticals remains complex and perhaps new economic models are needed to address the risk and cost of pharmaceutical development. Kenneth Arrow’s critiques of the limitations of economics to address health issues might provide interesting insights.

Cost-related insulin underuse is common and associated with poor glycemic control. Diabetes Published July 2018

I would like to conclude by citing a recent abstract providing a human side to the growing cost of pharmaceuticals. Darby Herkert (a Yale undergraduate) reported that a quarter of almost 200 patient responses to a survey of patients at a New Haven, CT, USA diabetes center reported cost-related insulin underuse. Underuse was prevalent among patients with lower income levels, patients without full-time employment, and patients without employer-provided insurance, Medicare or Medicaid. Patients reporting underuse had three times the incidence of of HbA1c >9%. These results cite the human costs of high insulin prices in the US. A Medscape review cites the high cost of typically prescribed insulin analogs, and quotes the lead author calling these prices irrational and describing patients living near the Mexican border crossing the border to buy their insulin.

Credits