Paul Mitchell’s journal round-up for 17th July 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

What goes wrong with the allocation of domestic and international resources for HIV? Health Economics [PubMedPublished 7th July 2017

Investment in foreign aid is coming under considered scrutiny as a number of leading western economies re-evaluate their role in the world and their obligations to countries with developing economies. Therefore, it is important for those who believe in the benefits of such investments to show that they are being done efficiently. This paper looks at how funding for HIV is distributed both domestically and internationally across countries, using multivariate regression analysis with instruments to control for reverse causality between financing and HIV prevalence, and domestic and international financing. The author is also concerned about countries free riding on international aid and estimates how countries ought to be allocating national resources to HIV using quintile regression to estimate what countries have fiscal space for expanding their current spending domestically. The results of the study show that domestic expenditure relative to GDP per capita is almost unit elastic, whereas it is inelastic with regards to HIV prevalence. Government effectiveness (as defined by the World Bank indices) has a statistically significant effect on domestic expenditure, although it is nonlinear, with gains more likely when moving up from a lower level of government effectiveness. International expenditure is inversely related to GDP per capita and HIV prevalence, and positively with government effectiveness, albeit the regression models for international expenditure had poor explanatory power. Countries with higher GDP per capita tended to dedicate more money towards HIV, however, the author reckons there is $3bn of fiscal space in countries such as South Africa and Nigeria to contribute more to HIV, freeing up international aid for other countries such as Cameroon, Ghana, Thailand, Pakistan and Columbia. The author is concerned that countries with higher GDP should be able to allocate more to HIV, but feels there are improvements to be made in how international aid is distributed too. Although there is plenty of food for thought in this paper, I was left wondering how this analysis can help in aiding a better allocation of resources. The normative model of what funding for HIV ought to be is from the viewpoint that this is the sole objective of countries of allocating resources, which is clearly contestable (the author even casts doubt as to whether this is true for international funding of HIV). Perhaps the other demands faced by national governments (e.g. funding for other diseases, education etc.) can be better reflected in future research in this area.

Can pay-for-performance to primary care providers stimulate appropriate use of antibiotics? Health Economics [PubMed] [RePEcPublished 7th July 2017

Antibiotic resistance is one of the largest challenges facing global health this century. This study from Sweden looks to see whether pay for performance (P4P) can have a role in the prescription practices of GPs when it comes to treating children with respiratory tract infection. P4P was introduced on a staggered basis across a number of regions in Sweden to incentivise primary care to use narrow spectrum penicillin as a first line treatment, as it is said to have a smaller impact on resistance. Taking advantage of data from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register between 2006-2013, the authors conducted a difference in difference regression analysis to show the effect P4P had on the share of the incentivised antibiotic. They find a positive main effect of P4P on drug prescribing of 1.1 percentage points, that is also statistically significant. Of interest, the P4P in Sweden under analysis here was not directly linked to salaries of GPs but the health care centre. Although there are a number of limitations with the study that the authors clearly highlight in the discussion, it is a good example of how to make the most of routinely available data. It also highlights that although the share of the less resistant antibiotic went up, the national picture of usage of antibiotics did not reduce in line with a national policy aimed at doing so during the same time period. Even though Sweden is reported to be one of the lower users of antibiotics in Europe, it highlights the need to carefully think through how targets are achieved and where incentives might help in some areas to meet such targets.

Econometric modelling of multiple self-reports of health states: the switch from EQ-5D-3L to EQ-5D-5L in evaluating drug therapies for rheumatoid arthritis. Journal of Health Economics Published 4th July 2017

The EQ-5D is the most frequently used health state descriptive system for the generation of utility values for quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) in economic evaluation. To improve sensitivity and reduce floor and ceiling effects, the EuroQol team developed a five level version (5L) compared to the previous three level (3L) version. This study adds to recent evidence in this area of the unforeseen consequences of making this change to the descriptive system and also the valuation system used for the 5L. Using data from the National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, where both 3L and 5L versions were completed simultaneously alongside other clinical measures, the authors construct a mapping between both versions of EQ-5D, informed by the response levels and the valuation systems that have been developed in the UK for the measures. They also test their mapping estimates on a previous economic evaluation for rheumatoid arthritis treatments. The descriptive results show that although there is a high correlation between both versions, and the 5L version achieves its aim of greater sensitivity, there is a systematic difference in utility scores generated using both versions, with an average 87% of the score of the 3L recorded compared to the 5L. Not only are there differences highlighted between value sets for the 3L and 5L but also the responses to dimensions across measures, where the mobility and pain dimensions do not align as one would expect. The new mapping developed in this paper highlights some of the issues with previous mapping methods used in practice, including the assumption of independence of dimension levels from one another that was used while the new valuation for the 5L was being developed. Although the case study they use to demonstrate the effect of using the different approaches in practice did not result in a different cost-effectiveness result, the study does manage to highlight that the assumption of 3L and 5L versions being substitutes for one another, both in terms of descriptive systems and value sets, does not hold. Although the authors are keen to highlight the benefits of their new mapping that produces a smooth distribution from actual to predicted 5L, decision makers will need to be clear about what descriptive system they now want for the generation of QALYs, given the discrepancies between 3L and 5L versions of EQ-5D, so that consistent results are obtained from economic evaluations.

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Paul Mitchell’s journal round-up for 15th May 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Informal care: choice or constraint. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences [PubMed] Published 12th April 2017

The provision of social care in the UK has become a major economic issue, with recent increases in government spending and local authority taxation to help ease the burden on both the health and social care system in the short term. This study examines some of the issues surrounding informal carers (i.e. care of a family member), estimated to be approximately 10% of the UK population. In particular, it focuses on the role of choice and constraints involved with the decision to become a carer. Using a cross-sectional survey for a UK city, choice of caring was explored in terms of responses to care provision provided, asking if it was a free choice initially to provide care, and if there were constraints in terms of duty, lack of others or financial resources for paid care. The analysis focused on how perceived choice in the caring role was associated with socio-demographics and the type of caring role performed, as well as the role of perceived choice in caring and their wellbeing. Out of the 798 respondents to all four questions on caring choice, about 1 in 3 reported an entirely free choice in the decision, with half reporting having a free choice but also a constraint in terms of duty, other available carers or financial resources. Less than 1 in 5 reported not having a free choice. Only carers with bad health or receiving state benefits had an association with a constrained caring role. The more intense the care role was also associated with a more constrained choice. Higher levels of choice were associated with higher levels of wellbeing across measures of happiness, life satisfaction and capability. In multivariable regression analysis, it was found that having a free choice in the initial caring decision resulted in a higher impact on life satisfaction than educational qualifications and home ownership, whilst improved capability of comparable levels to that of home ownership, all else being equal. The authors thus recommend enhanced choice as a way for policy to improve carers wellbeing. Although the authors acknowledge limitations with the study design being cross-sectional and geographically limited to one city, the study shows there is plenty of scope for understanding the determinants of informal caring and consequences for those carers in much greater detail in future national surveys to help address policy in this area in the medium to longer term.

Experienced utility or decision utility for QALY calculation? Both. Public Health Ethics [PhilPapersPublished 6th May 2017

How health states should be valued in population health metrics, like QALYs and DALYs, will not be an unfamiliar topic of discussion for regular readers of this blog. Instead of arguing for decision utility (i.e. accounting for general population preferences for avoiding health states) or experienced utility (i.e. accounting for patient experiences of health states), the authors in this paper argue for a combined approach, reviving a suggestion previously put forward by Lowenstein & Ubel. The authors neatly summarise some of the issues of relying on either decision utility or experienced utility approaches alone and instead argue for better informed decision utility exercises by using deliberative democracy methods where experienced utility in health states are also presented. Unfortunately, there is little detail of how this process might actually work in practice. There are likely to be issues of what patient experiences are presented in such an exercise and how other biases that may influence decision utility responses are controlled for in such an approach. Although I am generally in favour of more deliberative approaches to elicit informed values for resource allocation, I find that this paper makes a convincing case for neither of the utility approaches to valuation, rather than both.

The value of different aspects of person-centred care: a series of discrete choice experiments in people with long-term conditions. BMJ Open [PubMed] Published 26th April 2017

The term “person-centred care” is one which is gaining some prominence in how healthcare is provided. What it means, and how important different aspects of person-centred care are, is explored in this study using discrete choice experiments (DCEs). Through focus groups and drawing from the authors’ own experience in this area, four aspects of person-centred care for self-management of chronic conditions make up the attributes in the DCE across two levels: (i) information (same information for all/personalised information); (ii) situation (little account of current situation/suggestions that fit current situation); (iii) living well (everyone wants the same from life/works with patient for what they want from life); (iv) communication (neutral professional way/friendly professional way). A cost attribute was also attached to the DCE that was given to patient groups with chronic pain and chronic lung disease. The overall findings suggest that person-centred care focused on situation and living well were valued most with personal communication style valued the least. Latent class analysis also suggested that 1 in 5 of those sampled valued personalised information the most. Those with lower earnings were likely to look to reduce the cost attribute the most. The authors conclude that the focus on communication in current clinician training on person-centred care may not be what is of most value to patients. However, I am not entirely convinced by this argument, as it could be that communication was not seen as an issue by the respondents, perhaps somewhat influenced due to the skills clinicians already have obtained in this area. Clearly, these process aspects of care are difficult to develop attributes for in DCEs, and the authors acknowledge that the wording of the “neutral” and “high” levels may have biased responses. I also found that dropping the “negative” third level for each of the attributes unconvincing. It may have proved more difficult to complete than two levels, but it would have shown in much greater depth how much value is attached to the four attributes relative to one another.

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Paul Mitchell’s journal round-up for 17th April 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Is foreign direct investment good for health in low and middle income countries? An instrumental variable approach. Social Science & Medicine [PubMed] Published 28th March 2017

Foreign direct investment (FDI) is considered a key benefit of globalisation in the economic development of countries with developing economies. The effect FDI has on the population health of countries is less well understood. In this paper, the authors draw from a large panel of data, primarily World Bank and UN sources, for 85 low and middle income countries between 1974 and 2012 to assess the relationship between FDI and population health, proxied by life expectancy at birth, as well as child and adult mortality data. They explain clearly the problem of using basic regression analysis in trying to explain this relationship, given the problem of endogeneity between FDI and health outcomes. By introducing two instrumental variables, using grossed fixed capital formation and volatility of exchange rates in FDI origin countries, as well as controlling for GDP per capita, education, quality of institutions and urban population, the study shows that FDI is weakly statistically associated with life expectancy, estimated to amount to 4.15 year increase in life expectancy during the study period. FDI also appears to have an effect on reducing adult mortality, but a negligible effect on child mortality. They also produce some evidence that FDI linked to manufacturing could lead to reductions in life expectancy, although these findings are not as robust as the other findings using instrumental variables, so they recommend this relationship between FDI type and population health to be explored further. The paper also clearly shows the benefit of robust analysis using instrumental variables, as the results without the introduction of these variables to the regression would have led to misleading inferences, where no relationship between life expectancy and FDI would have been found if the analysis did not adjust for the underlying endogeneity bias.

Uncovering waste in US healthcare: evidence from ambulance referral patterns. Journal of Health Economics [PubMed] Published 22nd March 2017

This study looks to unpick some of the reasons behind the estimated waste in US healthcare spending, by focusing on mortality rates across the country following an emergency admission to hospital through ambulances. The authors argue that patients admitted to hospital for emergency care using ambulances act as a good instrument to assess hospital quality given the nature of emergency admissions limiting the selection bias of what type of patients end up in different hospitals. Using linear regressions, the study primarily measures the relationship between patients assigned to certain hospitals and the 90-day spending on these patients compared to mortality. They also consider one-year mortality and the downstream payments post-acute care (excluding pharmaceuticals outside the hospital setting) has on this outcome. Through a lengthy data cleaning process, the study looks at over 1.5 million admissions between 2002-2011, with a high average age of patients of 82 who are predominantly female and white. Approximately $27,500 per patient was spent in the first 90 days post-admission, with inpatient spending accounting for the majority of this amount (≈$16,000). The authors argue initially that the higher 90-day spending in some hospitals only produces modestly lower mortality rates. Spending over 1 year is estimated to cost more than $300,000 per life year, which the authors use to argue that current spending levels do not lead to improved outcomes. But when the authors dig deeper, it seems clear there is an association between hospitals who have higher spending on inpatient care and reduced mortality, approximately 10% lower. This leads to the authors turning their attention to post-acute care as their main target of reducing waste and they find an association between mortality and patients receiving specialised nursing care. However, this target seems somewhat strange to me, as post-acute care is not controlled for in the same way as their initial, insightful approach to randomising based on ambulatory care. I imagine those in such care are likely to be a different mix from those receiving other types of care post 90 days after the initial event. I feel there really is not enough to go on to make recommendations about specialist nursing care being the key waste driver from their analysis as it says nothing, beyond mortality, about the quality of care these elderly patients are receiving in the specialist nurse facilities. After reading this paper, one way I would suggest in reducing inefficiency related to their primary analysis could be to send patients to the most appropriate hospital for what the patient needs in the first place, which seems difficult given the complexity of the private and hospital provided mix of ambulatory care offered in the US currently.

Population health and the economy: mortality and the Great Recession in Europe. Health Economics [PubMed] Published 27th March 2017

Understanding how economic recessions affect population health is of great research interest given the recent global financial crisis that led to the worst downturn in economic performance in the West since the 1930s. This study uses data from 27 European countries between 2004 and 2010 collected by WHO and the World Bank to study the relationship between economic performance and population health by comparing national unemployment and mortality rates before and after 2007. Regression analyses appropriate for time-series data are applied with a number of different specifications applied. The authors find that the more severe the economic downturn, the greater the increase in life expectancy at birth. Additional specific health mortality rates follow a similar trend in their analysis, with largest improvements observed in countries where the severity of the recession was the highest. The only exception the authors note is data on suicide, where they argue the relationship is less clear, but points towards higher rates of suicide with greater unemployment. The message the authors were trying to get across in this study was not very clear throughout most of the paper and some lay readers of the abstract alone could easily be misled in thinking recessions themselves were responsible for better population health. Mortality rates fell across all six years, but at a faster rate in the recession years. Although the results appeared consistent across all models, question marks remain for me in terms of their initial variable selection. Although the discussion mentions evidence that suggests health care may not have a short-term effect on mortality, they did not consider any potential lagged effect record investment in healthcare as a proportion of GDP up until 2007 may have had on the initial recession years. The authors rule out earlier comparisons with countries in the post-Soviet era but do not consider the effect of recent EU accession for many of the countries and more regulated national policies as a consequence. Another issue is the potential of countries’ mortality rates to improve, where countries with existing lower life expectancy have more room for moving in the right direction. However, one interesting discussion point raised by the authors in trying to explain their findings is the potential impact of economic activity on pollution levels and knock-on health impacts from this (and to a lesser extent occupational health levels), that may have some plausibility in better mortality rates linked to physical health during recessions.

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