Meeting round-up: ISPOR Europe 2019

For many health economists, November is ISPOR Europe month, and this year was no exception! We gathered in the fantastic Bella Center in Copenhagen to debate, listen and breathe health economics and outcomes research from the 2nd to the 6th November. Missed it? Would like a recap? Stay tuned for the #ISPOREurope 2019 round-up!

Bella Center

My ISPOR week started with the fascinating course ‘Tools for reproducible real-world data analysis’ by Blythe Adamson and Rachael Sorg. My key take-home messages? Use an interface like R-markdown to produce a document with code and results automatically. Use a version control platform like Phabricator to make code review easy. Write a detailed protocol, write the code to follow the protocol, and then check the code side by side with the protocol.

Monday started with the impressive workshop on translating oncology clinical trial endpoints to real-world data (RWD) for decision making.

Keith Abrams set the scene. Electronic health records (EHRs) may be used to derive the overall survival (OS) benefit given the observed benefit on progression-free survival (PFS). Sylwia Bujkiewicz showed an example where a bivariate meta-analysis of RCTs was used to estimate the surrogate relationship between PFS and OS (paper here). Jessica Davies discussed some of the challenges, such as the lack of data on exposure to treatments in a way that matches the data recorded in trials. Federico Felizzi presented a method to determine the optimal treatment duration of a cancer drug (see here for the code).

Next up, the Women in HEOR session! Women in HEOR is an ISPOR initiative that aims to support the growth, development, and contribution of women. It included various initiatives at ISPOR Europe, such as dinners, receptions and, of course, this session.

Shelby Reed introduced, and Olivia Wu presented on the overwhelming evidence on the benefits of diversity and on how to foster it in our work environment. Nancy Berg presented on ISPOR’s commitment to diversity and equality. We then heard from Sabina Hutchison about how to network in a conference environment, how to develop a personal brand and present our pitch. Have a look at my twitter thread for the tips. For more information on the Women in HEOR activities at ISPOR Europe, search #WomenInHEOR on twitter. Loads of cool information!

My Monday afternoon started with the provocatively titled ‘Time for change? Has time come for the pharma industry to accept modest prices?’. Have a look here for my live twitter thread. Kate Dion started by noting that the pressure is on for the pharmaceutical industry to reduce drug prices. Sarah Garner argued that lower prices lead to more patients being able to access the drug, which in turn increases the company’s income. Michael Schröter argued that innovative products should have a premium price, such as with Hemlibra. Lastly, Jens Grueger supported the implementation of value-based price, given the cost-effectiveness threshold.

Keeping with the drug pricing theme, my next session was on indication-based pricing. Mireia Jofre Bonet tackled the question of whether a single price is stifling innovation. Adrian Towse was supportive of indication-based pricing because it allows for the price to depend on the value of each indication and expand access to the full licensed population. Andrew Briggs argued against indication-based pricing for three reasons. First, it would give companies the maximum value-based price across all indications. Second, it would lead to greater drug expenditure, leading to greater opportunity costs. Third, it would be difficult to enforce, given that it would require cooperation of all payers. Francis Arickx explained the pricing system in Belgium. Remarkably, prices can be renegotiated over time depending on new entrants to market and new evidence. Another excellent session at ISPOR Europe!

My final session on Monday was about the timely and important topic of approaches for OS extrapolation. Elisabeth Fenwick introduced the session by noting that innovations in oncology have given rise to different patterns of survival, with implications for extrapolation. Sven Klijn presented on the various available methods for survival extrapolation. John Whalen focused on mixture cure models for cost-effectiveness analysis. Steve Palmer argued that, although new methods, such as mixture cure models, may provide additional insight, the approach should be justified, evidence-based and alternatives explored. In sum, there is no single optimal method.

On Tuesday, my first session was the impressive workshop on estimating cost-effectiveness thresholds based on the opportunity cost (twitter thread). Nancy Devlin set the scene by explaining the importance of getting the cost-effectiveness threshold right. James Lomas explained how to estimate the opportunity cost to the health care system following the seminal work by Karl Claxton et al and also touching on some of James’s recent work. Martin Henriksson noted that, by itself, the opportunity cost is not sufficient to define the threshold if we wish to consider solidarity and need alongside cost-effectiveness. The advantage of knowing the opportunity cost is that we can make informed trade-offs between health maximisation and other elements of value. Danny Palnoch finished the panel by explaining the challenges when deciding what to pay for a new treatment.

Clearly there is a tension between the price that pharmaceutical companies feel is reasonable, the opportunity cost to the health care service, and the desire by stakeholders to use the drug. I feel this in every session of the NICE appraisal committee!

My next session was the compelling panel on the use of RWD to revisit the HTA decision (twitter thread). Craig Brooks-Rooney noted that, as regulators increasingly license technologies based on weaker evidence, HTA agencies are under pressure to adapt their methods to the available evidence. Adrian Towse proposed a conceptual framework to use RWD to revisit decisions based on value of information analysis. Jeanette Kusel went through examples where RWD has been used to inform NICE decisions, such as brentuximab vendotin. Anna Halliday discussed the many practical challenges to implement RWD collection to inform re-appraisals. Anna finished with the caution against prolonging negotiations and appraisals, which could lead to delays to patient access.

My Wednesday started with the stimulating panel on drugs with tumour agnostic indications. Clarissa Higuchi Zerbini introduced the panel and proposed some questions to be addressed. Rosa Giuliani contributed with the clinical perspective. Jacoline Bouvy discussed the challenges faced by NICE and ways forward in appraising tumour-agnostic drugs. Marc van den Bulcke finished the panel with an overview of how next generation sequencing has been implemented in Belgium.

My last session was the brilliant workshop on HTA methods for antibiotics.

Mark Sculpher introduced the topic. Antibiotic resistance is a major challenge for humanity, but the development of new antibiotics is declining. Beth Woods presented a new framework for HTA of antibiotics. The goal is to reflect the full value of antibiotics whilst accounting for the opportunity cost and uncertainties in the evidence (see this report for more details). Angela Blake offered the industry perspective. She argued that revenues should be delinked to volume, to be holistic in the value assessment, and to be mindful of the incentives faced by drug companies. Nick Crabb finished by introducing a new project, by NICE and NHS England, on the feasibility of innovative value assessments for antibiotics.

And this is the end of the absolutely outstanding ISPOR Europe 2019! If you’re eager for more, have a look at the video below with my conference highlights!

Meeting round-up: Second Essen Economics of Mental Health Workshop

On 24th and 25th of June 2019, the second Essen Economics of Mental Health Workshop took place addressing the topic of ‘Mental Health over the Life-Course’. Like last year, the workshop was organized by Ansgar Wübker and Christoph Kronenberg.

Two keynote presentations and 13 paper presentations covered a wide variety of topics concerning the economics of mental health and were thoroughly discussed by 18 participants. The group was a well-rounded mix of junior researchers as well as senior researchers.

The workshop started with a keynote given by Christopher J. Ruhm about  mortality trends in the US. He compared mortality trends between 2001 and 2017 for different groups (SES status, gender, age groups, and race/ethnicity) and found that mortality trends differ greatly between groups. In contrast to previous papers, he showed that mortality rate increases were mainly driven by younger age groups. He aims to advance the research by looking at different causes of death.

(c) Simon Decker

At the end of the workshop, the second keynote was given by Fabrizio Mazzonna who talked about cognitive decline. He showed that people who experience cognitive decline, but are not aware of it, are much more likely to experience wealth losses, especially in terms of financial wealth. Since those losses are not found among people without cognitive decline or among people that are aware of their cognitive decline, overestimation might play an important role.

In between the keynote sessions, we discussed the work of the participants using a relatively new workshop format compared to the usual workshop procedures in German academia. Each paper was presented by the discussant instead of the author, who then in turn only clarifies or responds. The presentation is followed by questions and discussion from all participants. Since all papers were shared in the group before the workshop, everybody could contribute, which led to thorough and fruitful discussions.

(c) Simon Decker

The presentations covered a wide range of topics concerning the economics of mental health. For example, Jakob Everding discussed the work of Michael Shields and his co-authors. They examined how changes of commodity prices translate into job security among Australian miners and how this consequently affects their mental health. Anwen Zhang’s work was discussed by Daniel Kamhöfer. He analyzed  whether the mental health of students is influenced by the mental health of their peers in class.

The first day ended with a dinner at Ponistra, a restaurant in Essen that specializes in organic food. The food was not just healthy, but also very delicious and there was enough time for conversations about economics and beyond.

After two days of presentations and discussions, we were all exhausted, but had gained good input on our papers and learned a great deal about the economics of mental health.

Credits

Meeting round-up: iHEA Congress 2019

Missed iHEA 2019? Or were you there but could not make it to all of the amazing sessions? Stay tuned for my conference highlights!

iHEA started on Saturday 13th with pre-congress sessions on fascinating research as well as more prosaic topics, such as early-career networking sessions with senior health economists. All attendees got a super useful plastic bottle – great idea iHEA team!

The conference proper launched on Sunday evening with the brilliant plenary session by Raj Chetty from Harvard University.

Monday morning started bright and early with the thought-provoking session on validation of CE models. It was chaired and discussed by Stefan Lhachimi and featured presentations by Isaac Corro Ramos, Talitha Feenstra and Salah Ghabri. I’m pleased to see that validation is coming to the forefront of current topics! Clearly, we need to do better in validating our models and documenting code, but we’re on the right track and engaged in making this happen.

Next up, the superb session on the societal perspective for cost-effectiveness analysis. It was an all-star cast with Mark Sculpher, Simon Walker, Susan Griffin, Peter Neumann, Lisa Robinson, and Werner Brouwer. I’ve live-tweeted it here.

The case was expertly made that taking a single sector perspective can be misleading when evaluating policies with cross-sectoral effects, hence the impact inventory by Simon and colleagues is a useful tool to guide the choice of sectors to include. At the same time, we should be mindful of the requirements of the decision-maker for whom CEA is intended. This was a compelling session, which will definitely set the scene for much more research to come.

After a tasty lunch (well done catering team!), I headed to the session on evaluations using non-randomised data. The presenters included Maninie Molatseli, Fernando Antonio Postali, James Love-Koh and Taufik Hidayat, on case studies from South Africa, Brazil and Indonesia. Marc Suhrcke chaired. I really enjoyed hearing about the practicalities of applying econometric methods to estimate treatment effects of system wide policies. And James’s presentation was a great application of distributional cost-effectiveness analysis.

I was on the presenter’s chair next, discussing the challenges in implementing policies in the southwest quadrant of the CE plane. This session was chaired by Anna Vassall and discussed by Gesine Meyer-Rath. Jack Dowie started by convincingly arguing that the decision rule should be the same regardless of where in the CE plane the policy falls. David Bath and Sergio Torres-Rueda presented fascinating case studies of south west policies. And I argued that the barrier was essentially a problem of communication (presentation available here). An energetic discussion followed and showed that, even in our field, the matter is far from settled.

The day finished with the memorial session for the wonderful Alan Maynard and Uwe Reinhardt, both of whom did so much for health economics. It was a beautiful session, where people got together to share incredible stories from these health economics heroes. And if you’d like to know more, both Alan and Uwe have published books here and here.

Tuesday started with the session on precision medicine, chaired by Dean Regier, and featuring Rosalie Viney, Chris McCabe and Stuart Peacock. Rather than slides, the screen was filled with a video of a cosy fireplace, inviting the audience to take part in the discussion.

Under debate was whether precision medicine is a completely different type of technology, with added benefits over and above improvement to health, and needing a different CE framework. The panellists were absolutely outstanding in debating the issues! Although I understand the benefits beyond health that these technologies can offer, I side with the view that, like with other technologies, value is about whether the added benefits are worth the losses given the opportunity cost.

My final session of the day was by the great Mike Drummond, comparing how HTA has influenced the uptake of new anticancer drugs in Spain versus England (summary in thread below). Mike and colleagues found that positive recommendations do increase utilisation, but the magnitude of change differs by country and region. The work is ongoing in checking that utilisation has been picked up accurately in the routine data sources.

The conference dinner was at the Markthalle, with plenty of drinks and loads of international food to choose from. I had to have an early night given that I was presenting at 8:30 the next morning. Others, though, enjoyed the party until the early hours!

Indeed, Wednesday started with my session on cost-effectiveness analysis of diagnostic tests. Alison Smith presented on her remarkable work on measurement uncertainty while Hayley Jones gave a masterclass on her new method for meta-analysis of test accuracy across multiple thresholds. I presented on the CEA of test sequences (available here). Simon Walker and James Buchanan added insightful points as discussants. We had a fantastically engaged audience, with great questions and comments. It shows that the CEA of diagnostic tests is becoming a hugely important topic.

Sadly, some other morning sessions were not as well attended. One session, also on CEA, was even cancelled due to lack of audience! For future conferences, I’d suggest scheduling the sessions on the day after the conference dinner a bit later, as well as having fewer sessions to choose from.

Next up on my agenda was the exceptional session on equity, chaired by Paula Lorgelly, and with presentations by Richard Cookson, Susan Griffin and Ijeoma Edoka. I was unable to attend, but I have watched it at home via YouTube (from 1:57:10)! That’s right, some sessions were live streamed and are still available via the iHEA website. Do have a look!

My last session of the conference was on end-of-life care, with Charles Normand chairing, discussed by Helen Mason, Eric Finkelstein, and Mendwas Dzingina, and presentations by Koonal Shah, Bridget Johnson and Nikki McCaffrey. It was a really thought-provoking session, raising questions on the value of interventions at the end-of-life compared to at other stages of the life course.

Lastly, the outstanding plenary session by Lise Rochaix and Joseph Kutzin on how to translate health economics research into policy. Lise and Joseph had pragmatic suggestions and insightful comments on the communication of health economics research to policy makers. Superb! Also available on the live stream here (from 06:09:44).

iHEA 2019 was truly an amazing conference. Expertly organised, well thought-out and with lots of interesting sessions to choose from. iHEA 2021 in Cape Town is firmly in my diary!