Sam Watson’s journal round-up for 26th November 2018

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Alcohol and self-control: a field experiment in India. American Economic Review Forthcoming

Addiction is complex. For many people it is characterised by a need or compulsion to take something, often to prevent withdrawal, often in conflict with a desire to not take it. This conflicts with Gary Becker’s much-maligned rational theory of addiction, which views the addiction as a choice to maximise utility in the long term. Under Becker’s model, one could use market-based mechanisms to end repeated, long-term drug or alcohol use. By making the cost of continuing to use higher then people would choose to stop. This has led to the development of interventions like conditional payment or cost mechanisms: a user would receive a payment on condition of sobriety. Previous studies, however, have found little evidence people would be willing to pay for such sobriety contracts. This article reports a randomised trial among rickshaw drivers in Chennai, India, a group of people with a high prevalence of high alcohol use and dependency. The three trial arms consisted of a control arm who received an unconditional daily payment, a treatment arm who received a small payment plus extra if they passed a breathalyser test, and a third arm who had the choice between either of the two payment mechanisms. Two findings are of much interest. First, the incentive payments significantly increased daytime sobriety, and second, over half the participants preferred the conditional sobriety payments over the unconditional payments when they were weakly dominated, and a third still preferred them even when the unconditional payments were higher than the maximum possible conditional payment. This conflicts with a market-based conception of addiction and its treatment. Indeed, the nature of addiction means it can override all intrinsic motivation to stop, or do anything else frankly. So it makes sense that individuals are willing to pay for extrinsic motivation, which in this case did make a difference.

Heterogeneity in long term health outcomes of migrants within Italy. Journal of Health Economics [PubMed] [RePEc] Published 2nd November 2018

We’ve discussed neighbourhood effects a number of times on this blog (here and here, for example). In the absence of a randomised allocation to different neighbourhoods or areas, it is very difficult to discern why people living there or who have moved there might be better or worse off than elsewhere. This article is another neighbourhood effects analysis, this time framed through the lens of immigration. It looks at those who migrated within Italy in the 1970s during a period of large northward population movements. The authors, in essence, identify the average health and mental health of people who moved to different regions conditional on duration spent in origin destinations and a range of other factors. The analysis is conceptually similar to that of two papers we discussed at length on internal migration in the US and labour market outcomes in that it accounts for the duration of ‘exposure’ to poorer areas and differences between destinations. In the case of the labour market outcomes papers, the analysis couldn’t really differentiate between a causal effect of a neighbourhood increasing human capital, differences in labour market conditions, and unobserved heterogeneity between migrating people and families. Now this article examining Italian migration looks at health outcomes, such as the SF-12, which limit the explanations since one cannot ‘earn’ more health by moving elsewhere. Nevertheless, the labour market can still impact upon health strongly.

The authors carefully discuss the difficulties in identifying causal effects here. A number of model extensions are also estimated to try to deal with some issues discussed. This includes a type of propensity score weighting approach, although I would emphasize that this categorically does not deal with issues of unobserved heterogeneity. A finite mixture model is also estimated. Generally a well-thought-through analysis. However, there is a reliance on statistical significance here. I know I do bang on about statistical significance a lot, but it is widely used inappropriately. A rule of thumb I’ve adopted for reviewing papers for journals is that if the conclusions would change if you changed the statistical significance threshold then there’s probably an issue. This article would fail that test. They use a threshold of p<0.10 which seems inappropriate for an analysis with a sample size in the tens of thousands and they build a concluding narrative around what is and isn’t statistically significant. This is not to detract from the analysis, merely its interpretation. In future, this could be helped by banning asterisks in tables, like the AER has done, or better yet developing submission guidelines around its use.

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Brent Gibbons’s journal round-up for 9th April 2018

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

The effect of Medicaid on management of depression: evidence from the Oregon Health Insurance Experiment. The Milbank Quarterly [PubMed] Published 5th March 2018

For the first journal article of this week’s AHE round-up, I selected a follow-up study on the Oregon health insurance experiment. The Oregon Health Insurance Experiment (OHIE) used a lottery system to expand Medicaid to low-income uninsured adults (and their associated households) who were previously ineligible for coverage. Those interested in being part of the study had to sign up. Individuals were then randomly selected through the lottery, after which individuals needed to take further action to complete enrollment in Medicaid, which included showing that enrollment criteria were satisfied (e.g. income below 100% of poverty line). These details are important because many who were selected for the lottery did not complete enrollment in Medicaid, though being selected through the lottery was associated with a 25 percentage point increase in the probability of having insurance (which the authors confirm was overwhelmingly due to Medicaid and not other insurance). More details on the study and data are publicly available. The OHIE is a seminal study in that it allows researchers to study the effects of having insurance in an experimental design – albeit in the U.S. health care system’s context. The other study that comes to mind is of course the famous RAND health insurance experiment that allowed researchers to study the effects of different levels of health insurance coverage. For the OHIE, the authors importantly point out that it is not necessarily obvious what the impact of having insurance is. While we would expect increases in health care utilization, it is possible that increases in primary care utilization could result in offsetting reductions in other settings (e.g. hospital or emergency department use). Also, while we would expect increases in health as a result of increases in health care use, it is possible that by reducing adverse financial consequences (e.g. of unhealthy behavior), health insurance could discourage investments in health. Medicaid has also been criticized by some as not very good insurance – though there are strong arguments to the contrary. First-year outcomes were detailed in another paper. These included increased health care utilization (across all settings), decreased out-of-pocket medical expenditures, decreased medical debt, improvements in self-reported physical and mental health, and decreased probability of screening positive for depression. In the follow-up paper on management of depression, the authors further explore the causal effect and causal pathway of having Medicaid on depression diagnosis, treatment, and symptoms. Outcomes of interest are the effect of having Medicaid on the prevalence of undiagnosed and untreated depression, the use of depression treatments including medication, and on self-reported depressive symptoms. Where possible, outcomes are examined for those with a prior depression diagnosis and those without. In order to examine the effect of Medicaid insurance (vs. being uninsured), the authors needed to control for the selection bias introduced from uncompleted enrollment into Medicaid. Instrumental variable 2SLS was used with lottery selection as the sole instrument. Local average treatment effects were reported with clustered standard errors on the household. The effect of Medicaid on the management of depression was overwhelmingly positive. For those with no prior depression diagnosis, it increased the chance of receiving a diagnosis and decreased the prevalence of undiagnosed depression (those who scored high on study survey depression instrument but with no official diagnosis). As far as treatment, Medicaid reduced the share of the population with untreated depression, virtually eliminating untreated depression among those with pre-lottery depression. There was a large reduction in unmet need for mental health treatment and an increased share who received specific mental health treatments (i.e. prescription drugs and talk therapy). For self-reported symptoms, Medicaid reduced the overall rate screened for depression symptoms in the post-lottery period. All effects were relatively strong in magnitude, giving an overall convincing picture that Medicaid increased access to treatment, which improved depression symptoms. The biggest limitation of this study is its generalizability. Much of the results were focused on the city of Portland, which may not represent more rural parts of the state. More importantly, this was limited to the state of Oregon for low-income adults who not only expressed interest in signing up, but who were able to follow through to complete enrollment. Other limitations were that the study only looked at the first two years of outcomes and that there was limited information on the types of treatments received.

Tobacco regulation and cost-benefit analysis: how should we value foregone consumer surplus? American Journal of Health Economics [PubMed] [RePEcPublished 23rd January 2018

This second article addresses a very interesting theoretical question in cost-benefit analysis, that has emerged in the context of tobacco regulation. The general question is how should foregone consumer surplus, in the form of reduced smoking, be valued? The history of this particular question in the context of recent FDA efforts to regulate smoking is quite fascinating. I highly recommend reading the article just for this background. In brief, the FDA issued proposed regulations to implement graphic warning labels on cigarettes in 2010 and more recently proposed that cigars and e-cigarettes should also be subject to FDA regulation. In both cases, an economic impact analysis was required and debates ensued on if, and how, foregone consumer surplus should be valued. Economists on both sides weighed-in, some arguing that the FDA should not consider foregone consumer surplus because smoking behavior is irrational, others arguing consumers are perfectly rational and informed and the full consumer surplus should be valued, and still others arguing that some consumer surplus should be counted but there is likely bounded rationality and that it is methodologically unclear how to perform a valuation in such a case. The authors helpfully break down the debate into the following questions: 1) if we assume consumers are fully informed and rational, what is the right approach? 2) are consumers fully informed and rational? and 3) if consumers are not fully informed and rational, what is the right approach? The reason the first question is important is that the FDA was conducting the economic impact analysis by examining health gains and foregone consumer surplus separately. However, if consumers are perfectly rational and informed, their preferences already account for health impacts, meaning that only changes in consumer surplus should be counted. On the second question, the authors explore the literature on smoking behavior to understand “whether consumers are rational in the sense of reflecting stable preferences that fully take into account the available information on current and expected future consequences of current choices.” In general, the literature shows that consumers are pretty well aware of the risks, though they may underestimate the difficulty of quitting. On whether consumers are rational is a much harder question. The authors explore different rational addiction models, including quasi-rational addiction models that take into account more recent developments in behavioral economics, but declare that the literature at this point provides no clear answer and that no empirical test exists to distinguish between rational and quasi-rational models. Without answering whether consumers are fully informed and rational, the authors suggest that welfare analysis – even in the face of bounded rationality – can still use a similar valuation approach to consumer surplus as was recommended for when consumers are fully informed and rational. A series of simple supply and demand curves are presented where there is a biased demand curve (demand under bounded rationality) and an unbiased demand curve (demand where fully informed and rational) and different regulations are illustrated. The implication is that rather than trying to estimate health gains as a result of regulations, what is needed is to understand the amount of demand bias as result of bounded rationality. Foregone consumer surplus can then be appropriately measured. Of course, more research is needed to estimate if, and how much, ‘demand bias’ or bounded rationality exists. The framework of the paper is extremely useful and it pushes health economists to consider advances that have been made in environmental economics to account for bounded rationality in cost-benefit analysis.

2SLS versus 2SRI: appropriate methods for rare outcomes and/or rare exposures. Health Economics [PubMed] Published 26th March 2018

This third paper I will touch on only briefly, but I wanted to include it as it addresses an important methodological topic. The paper explores several alternative instrumental variable estimation techniques for situations when the treatment (exposure) variable is binary, compared to the common 2SLS (two-stage least squares) estimation technique which was developed for a linear setting with continuous endogenous treatments and outcome measures. A more flexible approach, referred to as 2SRI (two-stage residual inclusion) allows for non-linear estimation methods in the first stage (and second stage), including logit or probit estimation methods. As the title suggests, these alternative estimation methods may be particularly useful when treatment (exposure) and/or outcomes are rare (e.g below 5%). Monte Carlo simulations are performed on what the authors term ‘the simplest case’ where the outcome, treatment, and instrument are binary variables and a range of results are considered as the treatment and/or outcome become rarer. Model bias and consistency are assessed in the ability to produce average treatment effects (ATEs) and local average treatment effects (LATEs), comparing the 2SLS, several forms of probit-probit 2SRI models, and a bivariate probit model. Results are that the 2SLS produced biased estimates of the ATE, especially as treatment and outcomes become rarer. The 2SRI models had substantially higher bias than the bivariate probit in producing ATEs (though the bivariate probit requires the assumption of bivariate normality). For LATE, 2SLS always produces consistent estimates, even if the linear probability model produces out of range predictions. Estimates for 2SRI models and the bivariate probit model were biased in producing LATEs. An empirical example was also tested with data on the impact of long-term care insurance on long-term care use. Conclusions are that 2SRI models do not dependably produce unbiased estimates of ATEs. Among the 2SRI models though, there were varying levels of bias and the 2SRI model with generalized residuals appeared to produce the least ATE bias. For more rare treatments and outcomes, the 2SRI model with Anscombe residuals generated the least ATE bias. Results were similar to another simulation study by Chapman and Brooks. The study enhances our understanding of how different instrumental variable estimation methods may function under conditions where treatment and outcome variables have nonlinear distributions and where those same treatments and outcomes are rare. In general, the authors give a cautionary note to say that there is not one perfect estimation method in these types of conditions and that researchers should be aware of the potential pitfalls of different estimation methods.

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Sam Watson’s journal round-up for 1st May 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Systematic review of health economic impact evaluations of risk prediction models: stop developing, start evaluating. Value in Health [PubMed] Published April 2017

Risk prediction models are pervasive in clinical medicine. For example, one 2012 review of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) models identified 16 studies with 25 models. There was not much difference between the models in ability to predict T2DM and models including biomarkers were slightly better. But, obviously no model is perfect, the T2DM risk prediction tools generally overestimated the risk of development of diabetes. One could see parallels here with screening. When subjected to cost-benefit analyses, many screening programs become somewhat controversial. False positives can cause harm to patients both psychologically and through further procedures they may be subjected to. Such concerns thus may also apply to risk prediction models. This review surveys the literature on health economic evaluations of risk prediction models. Forty studies examining 60 risk models were included. Compare this number with the total of T2DM models above and you will see how the authors might arrive at the conclusion that economic evaluations of risk prediction models are rare. Another key finding, and one I empathize with as I am currently reviewing economic evaluations in another area of heath economics, is that there is a large amount of methodological heterogeneity and quality differences between studies. This makes comparisons difficult if not impossible. This limits the utility of these findings to decision makers. A routine, standardised approach to economic evaluation is needed.

The fading American dream: trends in absolute income mobility since 1940. Science [PubMed] [RePEc] Published 28th April 2017

This one is not strictly health. But it’s findings may have important implications for how we understand the relationship between income and health, and the inter-generational transmission of health. And, it’s not everyday an economics paper gets into Science. Economic mobility is a key goal for many societies – children should earn more than their parents. One way of examining this quantitatively is the proportion of children who earn more than their parents. This paper shows that this can be estimated using (i) the marginal income distribution of children, (ii) the marginal income distribution of parents, and (iii) the joint distribution of child and parent income ranks. The key finding is that mobility has declined over the 20th Century. While around 90% of children were earning more than their parents in 1940, by 1980 this is only around 40%. The authors look at what would happen to these estimates if GDP growth were more equally distributed and find much of the decline in mobility would be reversed.

Economic consequences of legal and illegal drugs: the case of social costs in Belgium. International Journal of Drug Policy [PubMed] Published 23rd April 2017

Put ten economists in a room and you’ll get 11 different opinions. Or so the saying goes. But while there is division on a number of topics in economics, some issues find a strong consensus. Drug prohibition is one of those issues many economists agree on. As a policy is has high costs and reasonably little benefit, especially when harm reduction is the goal. David Nutt, whose work we’ve discussed before, is a prominent critic of the UK government’s policy on drugs. Just this week he has discussed how the recent increase in the use of and health problems due to ‘spice’ (synthetic cannabinoids) may well be attributable to the prohibition of natural cannabis. However, recreational drug use, whether illegal or legal, does bear a societal cost. This paper attempts to quantify both the indirect and direct costs of drug use in Belgium. They take a ‘cost of illness’ approach, a term I think is a little unsuitable for the topic – most drug use causes no harm so could hardly be called illness. They also refer to the drugs as ‘addictive substances’, which is also a stretch for what they consider. Costs are further divided into health care and crime costs. The headline finding is that the total cost is 4.6 billion Euros annually. Interestingly, for illegal drugs, law enforcement expenditure was higher than the health care costs. In my mind this further undermines a prohibition policy. However, I think this study reveals the difficulty of taking an objective stance on these matters. Recreational substance use is an ‘illness’ and ‘addictive’ and bears a cost to society – the word ‘benefit’ is mentioned only once.

New metrics for economic evaluation in the presence of heterogeneity: focusing on evaluating policy alternatives rather than treatment alternatives. Medical Decision Making [PubMed] Published 25th April 2017

Cost-effectiveness analyses (CEA) are a key aspect of the evaluation of medical technologies and pharmaceutical products. Typically, the main output of these analyses is an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) or other summary measure of incremental costs and benefits. However, these ICERs typically use an average treatment effect and complete adoption. This is unlikely to be realistic, though, from a policy perspective. Both effectiveness and adoption rates may differ between sub-groups. This paper proposes a ‘policy’ framework that takes this heterogeneity into account. In essence, the paper advocates a weighted average ICER taking into account adoption rates and heterogeneous effectiveness. It takes this idea a step further and considers uncertainty about all the parameters. Conceptually, the framework is a straightforward extension of CEA, but the paper is clear and lucid and it certainly makes sense to evaluate technologies on the basis of how they will actually be used. Similar ideas have been used to take forward clinical trial design: with more information patients will make different treatment choices, for example. The trouble is, innovative and sensible ideas can be very slow to catch on.

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