Alastair Canaway’s journal round-up for 29th January 2018

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Is “end of life” a special case? Connecting Q with survey methods to measure societal support for views on the value of life-extending treatments. Health Economics [PubMed] Published 19th January 2018

Should end-of-life care be treated differently? A question often asked and previously discussed on this blog: findings to date are equivocal. This question is important given NICE’s End-of-Life Guidance for increased QALY thresholds for life-extending interventions, and additionally the Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF). This week’s round-up sees Helen Mason and colleagues attempt to inform the debate around societal support for views of end-of-life care, by trying to determine the degree of support for different views on the value of life-extending treatment. It’s always a treat to see papers grounded in qualitative research in the big health economics journals and this month saw the use of a particularly novel mixed methods approach adding a quantitative element to their previous qualitative findings. They combined the novel (but increasingly recognisable thanks to the Glasgow team) Q methodology with survey techniques to examine the relative strength of views on end-of-life care that they had formulated in a previous Q methodology study. Their previous research had found that there are three prevalent viewpoints on the value of life-extending treatment: 1. ‘a population perspective: value for money, no special cases’, 2. ‘life is precious: valuing life-extension and patient choice’, 3. ‘valuing wider benefits and opportunity cost: the quality of life and death’. This paper used a large Q-based survey design (n=4902) to identify societal support for the three different viewpoints. Viewpoints 1 and 2 were found to be dominant, whilst there was little support for viewpoint 3. The two supported viewpoints are not complimentary: they represent the ethical divide between the utilitarian with a fixed budget (view 1), and the perspective based on entitlement to healthcare (view 2: which implies an expanding healthcare budget in practice). I suspect most health economists will fall into camp number one. In terms of informing decision making, this is very helpful, yet unhelpful: there is no clear answer. It is, however, useful for decision makers in providing evidence to balance the oft-repeated ‘end of life is special’ argument based solely on conjecture, and not evidence (disclosure: I have almost certainly made this argument before). Neither of the dominant viewpoints supports NICE’s End of Life Guidance nor the CDF. Viewpoint 1 suggests end of life interventions should be treated the same as others, whilst viewpoint 2 suggests that treatments should be provided if the patient chooses them; it does not make end of life a special case as this viewpoint believes all treatments should be available if people wish to have them (and we should expand budgets accordingly). Should end of life care be treated differently? Well, it depends on who you ask.

A systematic review and meta-analysis of childhood health utilities. Medical Decision Making [PubMed] Published 7th October 2017

If you’re working on an economic evaluation of an intervention targeting children then you are going to be thankful for this paper. The purpose of the paper was to create a compendium of utility values for childhood conditions. A systematic review was conducted which identified a whopping 26,634 papers after deduplication – sincere sympathy to those who had to do the abstract screening. Following abstract screening, data were extracted for the remaining 272 papers. In total, 3,414 utility values were included when all subgroups were considered – this covered all ICD-10 chapters relevant to child health. When considering only the ‘main study’ samples, 1,191 utility values were recorded and these are helpfully separated by health condition, and methodological characteristics. In short, the authors have successfully built a vast catalogue of child utility values (and distributions) for use in future economic evaluations. They didn’t, however, stop there, they then built on the systematic review results by conducting a meta-analysis to i) estimate health utility decrements for each condition category compared to general population health, and ii) to examine how methodological factors impact child utility values. Interestingly for those conducting research in children, they found that parental proxy values were associated with an overestimation of values. There is a lot to unpack in this paper and a lot of appendices and supplementary materials are included (including the excel database for all 3,414 subsamples of health utilities). I’m sure this will be a valuable resource in future for health economic researchers working in the childhood context. As far as MSc dissertation projects go, this is a very impressive contribution.

Estimating a cost-effectiveness threshold for the Spanish NHS. Health Economics [PubMed] [RePEc] Published 28th December 2017

In the UK, the cost-per-QALY threshold is long-established, although whether it is the ‘correct’ value is fiercely debated. Likewise in Spain, there is a commonly cited threshold value of €30,000 per QALY with a dearth of empirical justification. This paper sought to identify a cost-per-QALY threshold for the Spanish National Health Service (SNHS) by estimating the marginal cost per QALY at which the SNHS currently operates on average. This was achieved by exploiting data on 17 regional health services between the years 2008-2012 when the health budget experienced considerable cuts due to the global economic crisis. This paper uses econometric models based on the provoking work by Claxton et al in the UK (see the full paper if you’re interested in the model specification) to achieve this. Variations between Spanish regions over time allowed the authors to estimate the impact of health spending on outcomes (measured as quality-adjusted life expectancy); this was then translated into a cost-per-QALY value for the SNHS. The headline figures derived from the analysis give a threshold between €22,000 and €25,000 per QALY. This is substantially below the commonly cited threshold of €30,000 per QALY. There are, however (as to be expected) various limitations acknowledged by the authors, which means we should not take this threshold as set in stone. However, unlike the status quo, there is empirical evidence backing this threshold and it should stimulate further research and discussion about whether such a change should be implemented.

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Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 4th December 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Funding breakthrough therapies: a systematic review and recommendation. Health Policy Published 2nd December 2017

One of the (numerous) financial pressures on health care funders in the West is the introduction of innovative (and generally very expensive) new therapies. Some of these can be considered curative, which isn’t necessarily the best way for manufacturers to create a steady income. New funding arrangements have been proposed to facilitate patient access while maintaining financial sustainability. This article focuses on a specific group of innovative therapies known as ‘Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products’ (ATMPs), which includes gene therapies. The authors conducted a systematic review of papers proposing funding models and considered their appropriateness for ATMPs. There were 48 papers included in the review that proposed payment mechanisms for high-cost therapies. Three top-level groups were identified: i) financial agreements, ii) performance-based agreements, and iii) healthcoin (a tradable currency representing the value of outcomes). The different mechanisms are compared in terms of their feasibility, acceptability, burden, ‘financial attractiveness’ and their appeal to payers and manufacturers. Annuity payments are identified as relatively attractive compared to other options, but each mechanism is summarily shown to be imperfect in the ATMP context. So, instead, the authors propose an ATMP-specific fund. For UK readers, this will likely smell a bit too much like the disastrous Cancer Drugs Fund. It isn’t clear why such a programme would be superior to annuity payments or more inventive mechanisms, or even whether it would be theoretically sound. Thus, the proposal is not convincing.

Supply-side effects from public insurance expansions: evidence from physician labor markets. Health Economics [PubMed] Published 1st December 2017

Crazy though American health care may be, its inconsistency in coverage can make for good research fodder. The Child Health Insurance Program (CHIP) was set up in 1997 and then, when the initial money ran out 10 years later, the program was (eventually) expanded. In this study, the authors use the changes in CHIP to examine the impact of expanded public coverage on provider behaviour, namely; subspecialty training (which could become more attractive with a well-insured customer base), practice setting and prevailing wage offers. The data for the study relate to the physician labour market for New York state for 2002-2013, as collected in the Graduate Medical Education survey. A simple difference-in-differences analysis is conducted with reference to the 2009 CHIP expansion, controlling for physician demographics. Paediatricians are the treatment group and the control group is adult physician generalists (mostly internal medicine). 2009 seems to be associated with a step-change in the proportion of paediatricians choosing to subspecialise – an increased probability of about 8 percentage points. There is also an upward shift in the proportion of paediatricians entering private practice, with some (weak) evidence that there is an increased preference for rural areas. These changes don’t seem to be driven by relative wage increases, with no major change in trends. So it seems that the expanded coverage did have important supply-side effects. But the waters are muddy here. In particular, we have the Great Recession and Obamacare as possible alternative explanations. Though it’s difficult to come up with good reasons for why these might better explain the observed changes.

Reflections on the NICE decision to reject patient production losses. International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care [PubMedPublished 20th November 2017

When people conduct economic evaluations ‘from a societal perspective’, this often just means a health service perspective with productivity losses added. NICE explicitly exclude the inclusion of these production losses in health technology appraisals. This paper reviews the issues at play, focussing on the normative question of why they should (or should not) be included. Findings from a literature review are summarised with reference to the ethical, theoretical and policy questions. Unethical discrimination potentially occurs if people are denied health care on the basis of non-health-related characteristics, such as the ability to work. All else equal, should health care for men be prioritised over health care for women because men have higher wages? Are the unemployed less of a priority because they’re unemployed? The only basis on which to defend the efficiency of an approach that includes productivity losses seems to be a neoclassical welfarist one, which is hardly tenable in the context of health care. If we adopt the extra-welfarist understanding of opportunity cost as foregone health then there is really no place for production losses. The authors also argue that including production losses may be at odds with policy objectives, at least in the context of the NHS in the UK. Health systems based on privately-funded care or social insurance may have different priorities. The article concludes that taking account of production losses is at odds with the goal of health maximisation and therefore the purpose of the NHS in the UK. Personally, I think priority setting in health care should take a narrow health perspective. So I agree with the authors that production losses shouldn’t be included. I’m not sure this article will convince those who disagree, but it’s good to have a reference to vindicate NICE’s position.

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Alastair Canaway’s journal round-up for 31st October 2016

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Ethical hurdles in the prioritization of oncology care. Applied Health Economics and Health Policy [PubMedPublished 21st October 2016

Recently between health economists, there has been significant scrutiny and disquiet directed towards the Cancer Drugs Fund with Professor Karl Claxton describing it as “an appalling, unfair use of NHS resources”. With the latest reorganization of the Cancer Drugs Fund in mind, this article examining the ethical issues surrounding prioritisation of cancer care was of particular interest. As all health economists will tell you, there is an opportunity cost with any allocation of scarce resources. Likewise, with prioritisation of specific disease groups, there may be equity issues with specific patients’ lives essentially being valued more greatly than those suffering other conditions. This article conducts a systematic review of the oncology literature to examine the ethical issues surrounding inequity in healthcare. The review found that public and political attention often focuses on ‘availability’ of pharmacological treatment in addition to factors that lead to good outcomes. The public and political focus on availability can have perverse consequences as highlighted by the Cancer Drugs Fund: resources are diverted towards availability and away from other more cost-effective areas, and in turn this may have had a detrimental effect on care for non-cancer patients. Additionally, by approving high cost, less cost-effective agents, strain will be placed upon health budgets and causing problems for existing cost-effectiveness thresholds. If prioritisation for cancer drugs is to be pursued then the authors suggest that the question of how to fund new therapies equitably will need to be addressed. Although the above issues will not be new to most, the paper is still worth reading as it: i) gives an overview of the different prioritisation frameworks used across Europe, ii) provides several suggestions for how, if prioritization is to be pursued, it can be done in a fairer manner rather than simply overriding typical HTA decision processes, iii) considers the potential legal consequences of prioritisation and iv) the impact of prioritisation on the sustainability of healthcare funding.

Doctor-patient differences in risk and time preferences: a field experiment. Journal of Health Economics Published 19th October 2016

The patient-doctor agency interaction, and associated issues due to asymmetrical information is something that was discussed often during my health economics MSc, but rarely during my day to day work. Despite being very familiar with supplier induced demand, differences in risk and time preferences in the patient-doctor dyad wasn’t something I’d considered in recent times. Upon reading, immediately, it is clear that if risk and time preferences do differ, then what is seen as the optimal treatment for the patient may be very different to that of the doctor. This may lead to poorer adherence to treatments and worse outcomes. This paper sought to investigate whether patients and their doctors had similar time and risk preferences using a framed field experiment with 300 patients and 67 doctors in Athens, Greece in a natural clinical setting. The authors claim to be the first to attempt this, and have three main findings: i) there were significant time preference differences between the patients and doctors – doctors discounted future health gains and financial outcomes less heavily than patients; ii) there were no significant differences in risk preferences for health with both doctors and patients being mildly risk averse; iii) there were however risk preference differences for financial impacts with doctors being more risk averse than patients. The implication of this paper is that there is potential for improvements in doctor-patient communication for treatments, and as agents for patients, doctors should attempts to gauge their patient’s preferences and attitudes before recommending treatment. For those who heavily discount the future it may be preferable to provide care that increases the short term benefits.

Hospital productivity growth in the English NHS 2008/09 to 2013/14 [PDF]. Centre for Health Economics Research Paper [RePEcPublished 21st October 2016

Although this is technically a ‘journal round-up’, this week I’ve chosen to include the latest CHE report as I think it is something which may be of wider interest to the AHEBlog community. Given limited resources, there is an unerring call for both productivity and efficiency gains within the NHS. The CHE report examines the extent to which NHS hospitals have improved productivity: have they made better use of their resources by increasing the number of patients they treat and the services they deliver for the same or fewer inputs. To assess productivity, the report uses established methods: Total Factor Productivity (TFP) which is the ratio of all outputs to all inputs. Growth in TFP is seen as being key to improving patient care with limited resources. The primary report finding was that TFP growth at the trust level exhibits ‘extraordinary volatility’. For example one year there maybe TFP growth followed by negative growth the next year, and then positive growth. The authors assert that much of the TFP growth measured is in fact implausible, and much of the changes are driven largely by nominal effects alongside some real changes. These nominal effects may be data entry errors or changes in accounting practices and data recording processes which results in changes to the timing of the recording of outputs and inputs. This is an important finding for research assessing productivity growth within the NHS. The TFP approach is an established methodology, yet as this research demonstrates, such methods do not provide credible measures of productivity at the hospital level. If hospital level productivity growth is to be measured credibly, then a new methodology will be required.

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