Simon McNamara’s journal round-up for 21st January 2019

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Assessing capability in economic evaluation: a life course approach? The European Journal of Health Economics [PubMed] Published 8th January 2019

If you have spent any time on social media in the last week there is a good chance that you will have seen the hashtag #10yearchallenge. This hashtag is typically accompanied by two photos of the poster; one recent, and one from 10 years ago. Whilst the minority of these posts suggest that the elixir of permanent youth has been discovered and is being hidden away by a select group of people, the majority show clear signs of ageing. As time passes, we change. Our skin becomes wrinkled, our hair may become grey, and we may become heavier. What these pictures don’t show, is how we change internally – and I don’t mean biologically. As we become older, and we experience life, so the things we think are important change. Our souls become wrinkled, and our minds become heavier.

The first paper in this week’s round-up is founded on this premise, albeit grounded in the measurement of capability well-being across the life course, rather than a hashtag. The capabilities approach is grounded in the normative judgement that the desirability of policy outcomes should be evaluated by what Sen called the ‘capabilities’ they provide – “the functionings, or the capabilities to function” they give people, where functionings for a person are defined as “the various things that he or she manages to do or be in leading a good life” (Sen, 1993). The author (Joanna Coast) appeals to her, and others’, work on the family of ICECAP measures (capability measures), in order to argue that the capabilities we value changes across the stage of life we are experiencing. For example, she notes that the development work for the ICECAP-A (adults) resulted in the choice of an ‘achievement’ attribute in that instrument, whilst for ICECAP-O (older people) an alternative ‘role’ attribute was used – with the achievement attribute primarily linked to having the ability to make progress in life, and the role attribute linked to having the ability to do things that make you feel valued. Similarly, she notes that the attributes that emerged from development work on the ICECAP-SCM (supportive care – a term for the end of life) are different to those from ICECAP-A (adults), with dignity coming to the forefront as a valued attribute towards the end of life. The author then goes on to suggest that it would be normatively desirable to capture how the capabilities we value changes over the life-course, suggests this could be done with a range of different measures, and highlights a number of problems associated with this (e.g. when does a life-stage start and finish?).

You should read this paper. It is only four pages long and definitely worth your time. If you have spent enough time on social media to know what the #10yearchallenge is, then you definitely have time to read it. I think this is a really interesting topic and a great paper. It has certainly got me thinking more about capabilities, and I will be keeping an eye out for future papers on this in future.

Future directions in valuing benefits for estimating QALYs: is time up for the EQ-5D? Value in Health Published 17th January 2019

If EQ-5D were a person, I think I would be giving it a good hug right now. Every time my turn to write this round-up comes up there seems to be a new article criticising it, pointing out potential flaws in the way it has been valued, or proposing a new alternative. If it could speak, I imagine it would tell us it is doing its best – perhaps with a small tear in its eye. It has done what it can to evolve, it has tried to change, but as we approach its 30th birthday, and exciting new instruments are under development, the authors of the second paper in this week’s round-up question – “Is time up for the EQ-5D?”

If you are interested in the valuation of outcomes, you should probably read this paper. It is a really neat summary of recent developments in the assessment and valuation of the benefits of healthcare, and gives a good indication of where the field may be headed. Before jumping into reading the paper, it is worth dwelling on its title. Note that the authors have used the term “valuing benefits for estimating QALYs” and not “valuing health states for estimating QALYs”. This is telling, and reflects the growing interest in measuring, and valuing, the benefits of healthcare based upon a broader conception of well-being, rather than simply health as represented by the EQ-5D. It is this issue that rests at the heart of the paper, and is probably the biggest threat to the long-term domination of EQ-5D. If it wasn’t designed to capture the things we are now interested in, then why not modify it further, or go back to the drawing board and start again?

I am not going to attempt to cover all the points made in the paper, as I can’t do it justice in this blog; but in summary, the authors review a number of ways this could be done, outline recent developments in the way the subsequent instrument could be valued, and detail the potential advantages, disadvantages, and challenges of moving to a new instrument. Ultimately, the authors conclude that the future of the valuation of outcomes – be that with EQ-5D or something else, depends upon a number of judgements, including whether non-health factors are considered to be relevant when valuing the benefits of healthcare. If they are then EQ-5D isn’t fit for purpose, and we need a new instrument. Whilst the paper doesn’t provide a definitive answer to the question “Is Time Up for the EQ-5D?”, the fact that NICE, the EuroQol group, two of the authors of this paper, and a whole host of others, are currently collaborating on a new measure, which captures both health and non-health outcomes, indicates that EQ-5D may well be nearing the end of its dominance. I look forward to seeing how this work progresses over the next few years.

The association between economic uncertainty and suicide in the short-run. Social Science and Medicine [PubMed] [RePEc] Published 24th November 2018

As I write this, the United Kingdom is 10 weeks away from the date we are due to leave the European Union, and we are still uncertain about how, and potentially even whether, we will finally leave. The uncertainty created by Brexit covers both economic and social spheres, and impacts many of those in the United Kingdom, and many beyond who have ties to us. I am afraid the next paper isn’t a cheery one, but given this situation, it is a timely one.

In the final paper in this round-up, the authors explore the link between economic uncertainty and short-term suicide rates. This is done by linking the UK EPU index of economic uncertainty – an index generated based upon the articles published in 650 UK newspapers – to the daily suicide rates in England and Wales between 2001 and 2015. The authors find evidence of an increase in suicide rates on the days on which the EPU index was higher, and also of a lagged effect on the day after a spike in the index. Over the course of a year, this effect means a one standard deviation increase in the EPU is expected to lead to 11 additional deaths in that year. In comparison to the number of deaths per year from cardiovascular disease, and cancer, this effect is relatively modest, but is nevertheless concerning given the nature of the way in which these people are dying.

I am not going to pretend I enjoyed reading this paper. Technically it is good, and it is an interesting paper, but the topic was just a bit too dark and too relevant to our current situation. Whilst reading I couldn’t help but wonder whether I am going to be reading a similar paper linking Brexit uncertainty to suicide at some point in the future. Fingers crossed this isn’t the case.

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Thesis Thursday: Cheryl Jones

On the third Thursday of every month, we speak to a recent graduate about their thesis and their studies. This month’s guest is Dr Cheryl Jones who has a PhD from the University of Manchester. If you would like to suggest a candidate for an upcoming Thesis Thursday, get in touch.

Title
The economics of presenteeism in the context of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis
Supervisors
Katherine Payne, Suzanne Verstappen, Brenda Gannon
Repository link
https://www.research.manchester.ac.uk/portal/en/theses/the-economics-of-presenteeism-in-the-context-of-rheumatoid-arthritis-ankylosing-spondylitis-and-psoriatic-arthritis%288215e79a-925e-4664-9a3c-3fd42d643528%29.html

What attracted you to studying health-related presenteeism?

I was attracted to study presenteeism because it gave me a chance to address both normative and positive issues. Presenteeism, a concept related to productivity, is a controversial topic in the economic evaluation of healthcare technologies and is currently excluded from health economic evaluations, following the recommendation made by the NICE reference case. The reasons why productivity is excluded from economic evaluations are important and valid, however, there are some circumstances where excluding productivity is difficult to defend. Presenteeism offered an opportunity for me to explore and question the social value judgements that underpin economic evaluation methods with respect to productivity. In terms of positive issues related to presenteeism, research into the development of methods that can be used to measure and value presenteeism was (and still is) limited. This provided an opportunity to think creatively about the types of methods we could use, both quantitative and qualitative, to address and further methods for quantifying presenteeism.

Are existing tools adequate for measuring and valuing presenteeism in inflammatory arthritic conditions?

That is the question! Research into methods that can be used to quantify presenteeism is still in its infancy. Presenteeism is difficult to measure accurately because there are a lack of objective measures that can be used, for example, the number of cars assembled per day. As a consequence, many methods rely on self-report surveys, which tend to suffer from bias, such as reporting or recall bias. Methods that have been used to value presenteeism have largely focused on valuing presenteeism as a cost using the human capital approach (HCA: volume of presenteeism multiplied by a monetary factor). The monetary factor typically used to convert the volume of presenteeism into a cost value is wages. Valuing productivity using wages risks taking account of discriminatory factors that are associated with wages, such as age. There are also economic arguments that question whether the value of the wage truly reflects the value of productivity. My PhD focused on developing a method that values presenteeism as a non-monetary benefit, thereby avoiding the need to value it as a cost using wages. Overall, methods to measure and value presenteeism still have some way to go before a ‘gold standard’ can be established, however, there are many experts from many disciplines who are working to improve these methods.

Why was it important to conduct qualitative interviews as part of your research?

The quantitative component of my PhD was to develop an algorithm, using mapping methods, that links presenteeism with health status and capability measures. A study by Connolly et al. recommend conducting qualitative interviews to provide some evidence of face/content validity to establish whether a quantitative link between two measures (or concepts) is feasible and potentially valid. The qualitative study I conducted was designed to understand the extent to which the EQ-5D-5L, SF6D and ICECAP-C were able to capture those aspects of rheumatic conditions that negatively impact presenteeism. The results suggested that all three measures were able to capture those important aspects of rheumatic conditions that affect presenteeism; however, the results indicated that the SF6D would most likely be the most appropriate measure. The results from the quantitative mapping study identified the SF6D as the most suitable outcome measure able to predict presenteeism in working populations with rheumatic conditions. The advantage of the qualitative results was that it provided some evidence that explained why the SF6D was the more suitable measure rather than relying on speculation.

Is it feasible to predict presenteeism using outcome measures within economic evaluation?

I developed an algorithm that links presenteeism, measured using the Work Activity Productivity Impairment (WPAI) questionnaire, with health and capability. Health status was measured using the EQ-5D-5L and SF6D, and capability was measured using the ICECAP-A. The SF6D was identified as the most suitable measure to predict presenteeism in a population of employees with rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis. The results indicate that it is possible to predict presenteeism using generic outcome measures; however, the results have yet to be externally validated. The qualitative interviews provided evidence as to why the SF6D was the better predictor for presenteeism and the result gave rise to questions about the suitability of outcome measures given a specific population. The results indicate that it is potentially feasible to predict presenteeism using outcome measures.

What would be your key recommendation to a researcher hoping to capture the impact of an intervention on presenteeism?

Due to the lack of a ‘gold standard’ method for capturing the impact of presenteeism, I would recommend that the researcher reports and justifies their selection of the following:

  1. Provide a rationale that explains why presenteeism is an important factor that needs to be considered in the analysis.
  2. Explain how and why presenteeism will be captured and included in the analysis; as a cost, monetary benefit, or non-monetary benefit.
  3. Justify the methods used to measure and value presenteeism. It is important that the research clearly reports why specific tools, such as presenteeism surveys, have been selected for use.

Because there is no ‘gold standard’ method for measuring and valuing presenteeism and guidelines do not exist to inform the reporting of methods used to quantify presenteeism, it is important that the researcher reports and justifies their selection of methods used in their analysis.

Alastair Canaway’s journal round-up for 30th July 2018

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Is there an association between early weight status and utility-based health-related quality of life in young children? Quality of Life Research [PubMed] Published 10th July 2018

Childhood obesity is an issue which has risen to prominence in recent years. Concurrently, there has been an increased interest in measuring utility values in children for use in economic evaluation. In the obesity context, there are relatively few studies that have examined whether childhood weight status is associated with preference-based utility and, following, whether such measures are useful for the economic evaluation of childhood obesity interventions. This study sought to tackle this issue using the proxy version of the Health Utilities Index Mark 3 (HUI-3) and weight status data in 368 children aged five years. Associations between weight status and HUI-3 score were assessed using various regression techniques. No statistically significant differences were found between weight status and preference-based health-related quality of life (HRQL). This adds to several recent studies with similar findings which imply that young children may not experience any decrements in HRQL associated with weight status, or that the measures we have cannot capture these decrements. When considering trial-based economic evaluation of childhood obesity interventions, this highlights that we should not be solely relying on preference-based instruments.

Time is money: investigating the value of leisure time and unpaid work. Value in Health Published 14th July 2018

For those of us who work on trials, we almost always attempt to do some sort of ‘societal’ perspective incorporating benefits beyond health. When it comes to valuing leisure time and unpaid work there is a dearth of literature and numerous methodological challenges which has led to a bit of a scatter-gun approach to measuring and valuing (usually by ignoring) this time. The authors in the paper sought to value unpaid work (e.g. household chores and voluntary work) and leisure time (“non-productive” time to be spent on one’s likings, nb. this includes lunch breaks). They did this using online questionnaires which included contingent valuation exercises (WTP and WTA) in a sample of representative adults in the Netherlands. Regression techniques following best practice were used (two-part models with transformed data). Using WTA they found an additional hour of unpaid work and leisure time was valued at €16 Euros, whilst the WTP value was €9.50. These values fall into similar ranges to those used in other studies. There are many issues with stated preference studies, which the authors thoroughly acknowledge and address. These costs, so often omitted in economic evaluation, have the potential to be substantial and there remains a need to accurately value this time. Capturing and valuing these time costs remains an important issue, specifically, for those researchers working in countries where national guidelines for economic evaluation prefer a societal perspective.

The impact of depression on health-related quality of life and wellbeing: identifying important dimensions and assessing their inclusion in multi-attribute utility instruments. Quality of Life Research [PubMed] Published 13th July 2018

At the start of every trial, we ask “so what measures should we include?” In the UK, the EQ-5D is the default option, though this decision is not often straightforward. Mental health disorders have a huge burden of impact in terms of both costs (economic and healthcare) and health-related quality of life. How we currently measure the impact of such disorders in economic evaluation often receives scrutiny and there has been recent interest in broadening the evaluative space beyond health to include wellbeing, both subjective wellbeing (SWB) and capability wellbeing (CWB). This study sought to identify which dimensions of HRQL, SWB and CWB were most affected by depression (the most common mental health disorder) and to examine the sensitivity of existing multi-attribute utility instruments (MAUIs) to these dimensions. The study used data from the “Multi-Instrument Comparison” study – this includes lots of measures, including depression measures (Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, Kessler Psychological Distress Scale); SWB measures (Personal Wellbeing Index, Satisfaction with Life Scale, Integrated Household Survey); CWB (ICECAP-A); and multi-attribute utility instruments (15D, AQoL-4D, AQoL-8D, EQ-5D-5L, HUI-3, QWB-SA, and SF-6D). To identify dimensions that were important, the authors used the ‘Glass’s Delta effect size’ (the difference between the mean scores of healthy and self-reported groups divided by the standard deviation of the healthy group). To investigate the extent to which current MAUIs capture these dimensions, each MAUI was regressed on each dimension of HRQL, CWB and SWB. There were lots of interesting findings. Unsurprisingly, the most important dimensions were in the psychosocial dimensions of HRQL (e.g. the ‘coping’, ‘happiness’, and ‘self-worth’ dimensions of the AQoL-8D). Interestingly, the ICECAP-A proved to be the best measure for distinguishing between healthy individuals and those with depression. The SWB measures, on the other hand, were less impacted by depression. Of the MAUIs, the AQoL-8D was the most sensitive, whilst our beloved EQ-5D-5L and SF-6D were the least sensitive at distinguishing dimensions. There is a huge amount to unpack within this study, but it does raise interesting questions regarding measurement issues and the impact of broadening the evaluative space for decision makers. Finally, it’s worth noting that a new MAUI (ReQoL) for mental health has been recently developed – although further testing is needed, this is something to consider in future.

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