Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 17th December 2018

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Health related quality of life aspects not captured by EQ-5D-5L: results from an international survey of patients. Health Policy Published 14th December 2018

Generic preference-based measures, such as the EQ-5D, cannot capture all aspects of health-related quality of life. They’re not meant to. Rather, their purpose is to capture just enough information to be able to adequately distinguish between health states with respect to the domains deemed normatively relavent to decisionmakers. The stated aim of this paper is to determine whether people with a variety of chronic conditions believe that their experiences can be adequately represented by the EQ-5D-5L.

The authors conducted an online survey, identifying participants through 320 patient associations across 47 countries. Participants were asked to complete the EQ-5D-5L and then asked if any aspects of their illness, which had a “big impact” on their health, were not captured by the EQ-5D-5L. 1,031 people started the survey and 767 completed it. More than half were from the UK. 51% of respondents said that there was some aspect of health not captured by the EQ-5D-5L. Of them, 19% mentioned fatigue, 12% mentioned medication side effects, 9.5% mentioned co-morbid conditions, and then a bunch of others in smaller proportions.

It’s nice to know what people think, but I have a few concerns about the usefulness of this study. One of the main problems is that it doesn’t seem safe to assume that respondents interpret “big impact” as meaning “an impact that is independently important in determining your overall level of quality of life”. So, even if we accept that people judging something to be important makes it important (which I’m not sure it does), then we still can’t be sure whether what they are identifying is within the scope of what we’re trying to measure. For starters, I can see no justification for including a ‘medication side effects’ domain. There’s also some concern about selection and attrition. I’d guess that people with more complicated or less common health concerns would be more likely to start and finish a survey about more complicated or less common health concerns.

The main thing I took from this study is that half of respondents with chronic diseases thought that the EQ-5D-5L captured every single aspect of health that had a “big impact”, and that there wasn’t broad support for any other specific dimension.

Reducing drug wastage in pharmaceuticals dosed by weight or body surface areas by optimising vial sizes. Applied Health Economics and Health Policy [PubMed] Published 5th December 2018

It’s common for pharmaceuticals to be wasted. Not just those out-of-date painkillers you threw in the bin, but also the expensive stuff being used in hospitals. One of the main reasons that waste occurs is that vials are made to specific sizes and, often, dosage varies from patient to patient – according to weight, for example – and doesn’t match the vial size. Suppose that vials are available as 50mg and 80mg and that an individual requires a 60mg dose. One way to address this might be to allow for vial sharing, whereby the leftovers are given to the next patient. But that isn’t always possible. So, we might like to consider what the best combination of available vial sizes should be, given the characteristics of the population.

In this paper, the authors set out the problem mathematically. Essentially, the optimisation problem is to minimise cost across the population subject to the vial sizes. An example is presented for two drugs (pembrolizumab and cabazitaxel), simulating patients based on samples drawn from the Health Survey for England. Simplifications are applied to the examples, such as setting a constraint of 8 vials per patient and assuming that prices are linear (i.e. fixed per milligram).

Pembrolizumab is currently available in 50mg and 100mg vials, and the authors estimate current wastage to be 13.2%. The simulations show that switching the 50mg to a 70mg would cut wastage to 8.6%. Cabazitaxel is available in 60mg vials, resulting in 19.4% wastage. Introducing a 12.5mg vial would cut wastage by around two thirds. An important general finding, which should be self-evident, is that vial sizes should not be divisible by each other, as this limits the number of possible combinations.

Depending on when vial sizes are determined (e.g. pre- or post-authorisation), pharmaceutical companies might use it to increase profit margins, or health systems might use it to save costs. Regardless, wastage isn’t useful. Evidence-based manufacture is an example of one of those best ideas; the sort that is simple and seems obvious once it’s spelt out. It’s a rare opportunity to benefit patients, health care providers, and manufacturers, with no significant burden on policymakers.

Death or debt? National estimates of financial toxicity in persons with newly-diagnosed cancer. The American Journal of Medicine [PubMed] Published October 2018

If you’re British, what’s the scariest thing about an ‘Americanised’ (/Americanized) health care system? Expensive inhalers? A shortened life expectancy? My guess is that the prospect of having to add financial ruin to terminal illness looms pretty large. You should make sure your fear is evidence-based. Here’s a paper to shake in the face of anyone who doesn’t support universal health care.

The authors use data from the Health and Retirement Study from 1998-2014, which includes people over 50 years of age and includes new (self-reported) diagnoses of cancer. This was the basis for inclusion in the study, with over 9.5 million new diagnoses of cancer. Up to two years pre-diagnosis was taken as a baseline. The data set also includes information on participants’ assets and debts, allowing the authors to use change in net worth as the primary outcome. Generalised linear models were used to assess various indicators of financial toxicity, including change or incurrence of consumer debt, mortgage debt, and home equity debt at two- and four-year follow-up. In addition to cancer diagnosis, various chronic comorbidities and socio-demographic variables were included in the models.

Shockingly, after two years following diagnosis, 42.4% of people had depleted their entire life’s assets. Average net worth had dropped $92,000. After four years, 38.2% were still insolvent. Women, older people, people who weren’t White, people with Medicaid, and those with worsening cancer status were among those more likely to have completely depleted their assets within two years. Having private insurance and being married had protective effects, as we might expect. There were some interesting findings associated with the 2008 financial crisis, which also seemed to be protective. And a protective effect associated with psychiatric comorbidity deserves more thought.

It’s difficult to explain away any (let alone all) of the magnitude of these findings. The analysis seems robust. But, given all other evidence available about out-of-pocket costs for cancer patients in the US, it should be shocking but not unexpected. The authors describe financial toxicity as ‘unintended’. There’s nothing unintended about this. Policymakers in the US keep deciding that they’d prefer to destroy the lives of sick people than allow for the spreading of that financial risk.

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Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 19th February 2018

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Value of information methods to design a clinical trial in a small population to optimise a health economic utility function. BMC Medical Research Methodology [PubMed] Published 8th February 2018

Statistical significance – whatever you think of it – and the ‘power’ of clinical trials to detect change, is an important decider in clinical decision-making. Trials are designed to be big enough to detect ‘statistically significant’ differences. But in the context of rare diseases, this can be nigh-on impossible. In theory, the required sample size could exceed the size of the whole population. This paper describes an alternative method for determining sample sizes for trials in this context, couched in a value of information framework. Generally speaking, power calculations ignore the ‘value’ or ‘cost’ associated with errors, while a value of information analysis would take this into account and allow accepted error rates to vary accordingly. The starting point for this study is the notion that sample sizes should take into account the size of the population to which the findings will be applicable. As such, sample sizes can be defined on the basis of maximising the expected (societal) utility associated with the conduct of the trial (whether the intervention is approved or not). The authors describe the basis for hypothesis testing within this framework and specify the utility function to be maximised. Honestly, I didn’t completely follow the stats notation in this paper, but that’s OK – the trial statisticians will get it. A case study application is presented from the context of treating children with severe haemophilia A, which demonstrates the potential to optimise utility according to sample size. The key point is that the power is much smaller than would be required by conventional methods and the sample size accordingly reduced. The authors also demonstrate the tendency for the optimal trial sample size to increase with the size of the population. This Bayesian approach at least partly undermines the frequentist basis on which ‘power’ is usually determined. So one issue is whether regulators will accept this as a basis for defining a trial that will determine clinical practice. But then regulators are increasingly willing to allow for special cases, and it seems that the context of rare diseases could be a way-in for Bayesian trial design of this sort.

EQ-5D-5L: smaller steps but a major step change? Health Economics [PubMed] Published 7th February 2018

This editorial was doing the rounds on Twitter last week. European (and Canadian) health economists love talking about the EQ-5D-5L. The editorial features in the edition of Health Economics that hosts the 5L value set for England, which – 2 years on – has finally satisfied the vagaries of academic publication. The authors provide a summary of what’s ‘new’ with the 5L, and why it matters. But we’ve probably all figured that out by now anyway. More interestingly, the editorial points out some remaining concerns with the use of the EQ-5D-5L in England (even if it is way better than the EQ-5D-3L and its 25-year old value set). For example, there is some clustering in the valuations that might reflect bias or problems with the technique and – even if they’re accurate – present difficulties for analysts. And there are also uncertain implications for decision-making that could systematically favour or disfavour particular treatments or groups of patients. On this basis, the authors support NICE’s decision to ‘pause’ and await independent review. I tend to disagree, for reasons that I can’t fit in this round-up, so come back tomorrow for a follow-up blog post.

Factors influencing health-related quality of life in patients with Type 1 diabetes. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes [PubMed] Published 2nd February 2018

Diabetes and its complications can impact upon almost every aspect of a person’s health. It isn’t clear what aspects of health-related quality of life might be amenable to improvement in people with Type 1 diabetes, or which characteristics should be targeted. This study looks at a cohort of trial participants (n=437) and uses regression analyses to determine which factors explain differences in health-related quality of life at baseline, as measured using the EQ-5D-3L. Age, HbA1c, disease duration and being obese all significantly influenced EQ-VAS values, while self-reported mental illness and unemployment status were negatively associated with EQ-5D index scores. People who were unemployed were more likely to report problems in the mobility, self-care, and pain/discomfort domains. There are some minor misinterpretations in the paper (divining a ‘reduction’ in scores from a cross-section, for example). And the use of standard linear regression models is questionable given the nature of EQ-5D-3L index values. But the findings demonstrate the importance of looking beyond the direct consequences of a disease in order to identify the causes of reduced health-related quality of life. Getting people back to work could be more effective than most health care as a means of improving health-related quality of life.

Financial incentives for chronic disease management: results and limitations of 2 randomized clinical trials with New York Medicaid patients. American Journal of Health Promotion [PubMed] Published 1st February 2018

Chronic diseases require (self-)management, but it isn’t always easy to ensure that patients adhere to the medication or lifestyle changes that could improve health outcomes. This study looks at the effectiveness of financial incentives in the context of diabetes and hypertension. The data are drawn from 2 RCTs (n=1879) which, together, considered 3 types of incentive – process-based, outcome-based, or a combination of the two – compared with no financial incentives. Process-based incentives rewarded participants for attending primary care or endocrinologist appointments and filling their prescriptions, up to a maximum of $250. Outcome-based incentives rewarded up to $250 for achieving target reductions in systolic blood pressure or blood glucose levels. The combined arms could receive both rewards up to the same maximum of $250. In short, none of the financial incentives made any real difference. But generally speaking, at 6-month follow-up, the movement was in the right direction, with average blood pressure and blood glucose levels tending to fall in all arms. It’s not often that authors include the word ‘limitations’ in the title of a paper, but it’s the limitations that are most interesting here. One key difficulty is that most of the participants had relatively acceptable levels of the target outcomes at baseline, meaning that they may already have been managing their disease well and there may not have been much room for improvement. It would be easy to interpret these findings as showing that – generally speaking – financial incentives aren’t effective. But the study is more useful as a way of demonstrating the circumstances in which we can expect financial incentives to be ineffective, and support a better-informed targeting for future programmes.

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