Sam Watson’s journal round-up for 30th October 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Conditional cash transfers: the case of Progresa/OportunidadesJournal of Economic Literature [RePEc] Published September 2017

The Progresa/Oportunidades programme was instigated in Mexico in 1995. The main innovation of the programme was a series of cash payments conditional on various human capital investments in children, such as regular school attendance and health check-ups. Beginning principally in rural areas, it expanded to urban areas in 2000-1. Excitingly for researchers, randomised implementation of the programme was built into its rollout, permitting evaluation of its effectiveness. Given it was the first such programme in a low- or middle-income country to do this, there has been a considerable amount of analysis and literature published on the topic. This article provides an in-depth review of this literature – incorporating over one hundred articles from economics and health journals. I’ll just focus on the health-related aspects of the review rather than education, labour market, or nutrition outcomes, but they’re also worth a look. The article provides a simple theoretical model about the effects of conditional cash transfers to start with and suggests that they have both a price effect, through reducing the shadow wage of time in activities other than those to which the payment is targeted, and an income effect, by increasing total income. The latter effect is ambiguous in its direction. For health, a large number of outcomes including child mortality and height, behavioural problems, obesity, and depression have all been assessed. For the most part  this has been through health modules applied to a subsample of people in surveys, which may limit the conclusions one can make for reasons such as attrition in the samples of treated and control households. Generally, the programme has demonstrated positive health effects (of varying magnitudes) in both the short and medium terms. Health care utilisation increased and with it there was a reduction in self-reported illness, behavioural problems, and obesity. However, positive effects are not reported universally. For example, one study reported an increase in child height in the short term, but in the medium term little change was reported in height-for-age z-scores in another study, which may suggest children catch-up in their growth. Nevertheless, it seems as though the programme succeeded in its aims, although there remains the question of its cost-benefit ratio and whether these ends could have been achieved more cost-effectively by other means. There is also the political question about the paternalism of the programme. While some political issues are covered, such as the perception of the programme as a vehicle for buying votes, and strategies for mitigating these issues, the issue of its acceptability to poor Mexicans is not well covered.

Health‐care quality and information failure: evidence from Nigeria. Health Economics [PubMedPublished 23rd October 2017

When we conceive of health care quality we often think of preventable harm to patients. Higher quality institutions make fewer errors such as incorrect diagnoses, mistakes with medication, or surgical gaffes. However, determining when an error has been made is difficult and quality is often poorly correlated with typical measures of performance like standardised mortality ratios. Evaluating quality is harder still in resource-poor settings where there are no routine data for evaluation and often an absence of patient records. Patients may also have less knowledge about what constitutes quality care. This may provide an environment for low-quality providers to remain in business as patients do not discriminate on the basis of quality. Patient satisfaction is another important aspect of quality, but not necessarily related to more ‘technical’ aspects of quality. For example, a patient may feel that they’ve not had to wait long and been treated respectfully even if they have been, unbeknownst to them, misdiagnosed and given the wrong medication. This article looks at data from Nigeria to examine whether measures of patient satisfaction are correlated with technical quality such as diagnostic accuracy and medicines availability. In brief, they report that there is little variation in patient satisfaction reports, which may be due to some reporting bias, and that diagnostic accuracy was correlated with satisfaction but other markers of quality were not. Importantly though, the measures of technical quality did little to explain the overall variation in patient satisfaction.

State intimate partner violence-related firearm laws and intimate partner homicide rates in the United States, 1991 to 2015. Annals of Internal Medicine [PubMedPublished 17th October 2017

Gun violence in the United States is a major health issue. Other major causes of death and injury attract significant financial investment and policy responses. However, the political nature of firearms in the US limit any such response. Indeed, a 1996 law passed by Congress forbade the CDC “to advocate or promote gun control”, which a succession of CDC directors has interpreted as meaning no federally funded research into gun violence at all. As such, for such a serious cause of death and disability, there is disproportionately little research. This article (not federally funded, of course) examines the impact of gun control legislation on inter-partner violence (IPV). Given the large proportion of inter-partner homicides (IPH) carried out with a gun, persons convicted of IPV felonies and, since 1996, misdemeanours are prohibited from possessing a firearm. However, there is variation in states about whether those convicted of an IPV crime have to surrender a weapon already in their possession. This article examines whether states that enacted ‘relinquishment’ laws that force IPV criminals to surrender their weapons reduced the rate of IPHs. They use state-level panel data and a negative binomial fixed effects model and find that relinquishment laws reduced the risk of IPHs by around 10% and firearm-related IPH by around 15%.

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Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 31st July 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

An exploratory study on using principal-component analysis and confirmatory factor analysis to identify bolt-on dimensions: the EQ-5D case study. Value in Health Published 14th July 2017

I’m not convinced by the idea of using bolt-on dimensions for multi-attribute utility instruments. A state description with a bolt-on refers to a different evaluative space, and therefore is not comparable with the progenitor, thus undermining its purpose. Maybe this study will persuade me otherwise. The authors analyse data from the Multi Instrument Comparison database, including responses to EQ-5D-5L, SF-6D, HUI3, AQoL 8D and 15D questionnaires, as well as the ICECAP and 3 measures of subjective well-being. Content analysis was used to allocate items from the measures to underlying constructs of health-related quality of life. The sample of 8022 was randomly split, with one half used for principal-component analysis and confirmatory factor analysis, and the other used for validation. This approach looks at the underlying constructs associated with health-related quality of life and the extent to which individual items from the questionnaires influence them. Candidate items for bolt-ons are those items from questionnaires other than the EQ-5D that are important and not otherwise captured by the EQ-5D questions. The principal-component analysis supported a 9-component model: physical functioning, psychological symptoms, satisfaction, pain, relationships, speech/cognition, hearing, energy/sleep and vision. The EQ-5D only covered physical functioning, psychological symptoms and pain. Therefore, items from measures that explain the other 6 components represent bolt-on candidates for the EQ-5D. This study succeeds in its aim. It demonstrates what appears to be a meaningful quantitative approach to identifying items not fully captured by the EQ-5D, which might be added as bolt-ons. But it doesn’t answer the question of which (if any) of these bolt-ons ought to be added, or in what circumstances. That would at least require pre-definition of the evaluative space, which might not correspond to the authors’ chosen model of health-related quality of life. If it does, then these findings would be more persuasive as a reason to do away with the EQ-5D altogether.

Endogenous information, adverse selection, and prevention: implications for genetic testing policy. Journal of Health Economics Published 13th July 2017

If you can afford it, there are all sorts of genetic tests available nowadays. Some of them could provide valuable information about the risk of particular health problems in the future. Therefore, they can be used to guide individuals’ decisions about preventive care. But if the individual’s health care is financed through insurance, that same information could prove costly. It could reinforce that classic asymmetry of information and adverse selection problem. So we need policy that deals with this. This study considers the incentives and insurance market outcomes associated with four policy options: i) mandatory disclosure of test results, ii) voluntary disclosure, iii) insurers knowing the test was taken, but not the results and iv) complete ban on the use of test information by insurers. The authors describe a utility model that incorporates the use of prevention technologies, and available insurance contracts, amongst people who are informed or uninformed (according to whether they have taken a test) and high or low risk (according to test results). This is used to estimate the value of taking a genetic test, which differs under the four different policy options. Under voluntary disclosure, the information from a genetic test always has non-negative value to the individual, who can choose to only tell their insurer if it’s favourable. The analysis shows that, in terms of social welfare, mandatory disclosure is expected to be optimal, while an information ban is dominated by all other options. These findings are in line with previous studies, which were less generalisable according to the authors. In the introduction, the authors state that “ethical issues are beyond the scope of this paper”. That’s kind of a problem. I doubt anybody who supports an information ban does so on the basis that they think it will maximise social welfare in the fashion described in this paper. More likely, they’re worried about the inequities in health that mandatory disclosure could reinforce, about which this study tells us nothing. Still, an information ban seems to be a popular policy, and studies like this indicate that such decisions should be reconsidered in light of their expected impact on social welfare.

Returns to scientific publications for pharmaceutical products in the United States. Health Economics [PubMedPublished 10th July 2017

Publication bias is a big problem. Part of the cause is that pharmaceutical companies have no incentive to publish negative findings for their own products. Though positive findings may be valuable in terms of sales. As usual, it isn’t quite that simple when you really think about it. This study looks at the effect of publications on revenue for 20 branded drugs in 3 markets – statins, rheumatoid arthritis and asthma – using an ‘event-study’ approach. The authors analyse a panel of quarterly US sales data from 2003-2013 alongside publications identified through literature searches and several drug- and market-specific covariates. Effects are estimated using first difference and difference in first difference models. The authors hypothesise that publications should have an important impact on sales in markets with high generic competition, and less in those without or with high branded competition. Essentially, this is what they find. For statins and asthma drugs, where there was some competition, clinical studies in high-impact journals increased sales to the tune of $8 million per publication. For statins, volume was not significantly affected, with mediation through price. In rhematoid arthritis, where competition is limited, the effect on sales was mediated by the effect on volume. Studies published in lower impact journals seemed to have a negative influence. Cost-effectiveness studies were only important in the market with high generic competition, increasing statin sales by $2.2 million on average. I’d imagine that these impacts are something with which firms already have a reasonable grasp. But this study provides value to public policy decision makers. It highlights those situations in which we might expect manufacturers to publish evidence and those in which it might be worthwhile increasing public investment to pick up the slack. It could also help identify where publication bias might be a bigger problem due to the incentives faced by pharmaceutical companies.

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Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 16th January 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Competition and quality indicators in the health care sector: empirical evidence from the Dutch hospital sector. The European Journal of Health Economics [PubMed] Published 3rd January 2017

In case you weren’t already convinced, this paper presents more evidence to support the notion that (non-price) competition between health care providers is good for quality. The Dutch system is based on compulsory insurance and information on quality of hospital care is made public. One feature of the Dutch health system is that – for many elective hospital services – prices are set following a negotiation between insurers and hospitals. This makes the setting of the study a bit different to some of the European evidence considered to date, because there is scope for competition on price. The study looks at claims data for 3 diagnosis groups – cataract, adenoid/tonsils and bladder tumor – between 2008 and 2011. The authors’ approach to measuring competition is a bit more sophisticated than some other studies’ and is based on actual market share. A variety of quality indicators are used for the 3 diagnosis groups relating mainly to the process of care (rather than health outcomes). Fixed and random effects linear regression models are used to estimate the impact of market share upon quality. Casemix was only controlled for in relation to the proportion of people over 65 and the proportion of women. Where a relationship was found, it tended to be in favour of lower market share (i.e. greater competition) being associated with higher quality. For cataract and for bladder tumor there was a ‘significant’ effect. So in this setting at least, competition seems to be good news for quality. But the effect sizes are neither huge nor certain. A look at each of the quality indicators separately showed plenty of ‘non-significant’ relationships in both directions. While a novelty of this study is the liberalised pricing context, the authors find that there is no relationship between price and quality scores. So even if we believe the competition-favouring results, we needn’t abandon the ‘non-price competition only’ mantra.

Cost-effectiveness thresholds in global health: taking a multisectoral perspective. Value in Health Published 3rd January 2017

We all know health care is not the only – and probably not even the most important – determinant of health. We call ourselves health economists, but most of us are simply health care economists. Rarely do we look beyond the domain of health care. If our goal as researchers is to help improve population health, then we should probably be allocating more of our mental resource beyond health care. The same goes for public spending. Publicly provided education might improve health in a way that the health service would be willing to fund. Likewise, health care might improve educational attainment. This study considers resource allocation decisions using the familiar ‘bookshelf approach’, but goes beyond the unisectoral perspective. The authors discuss a two-sector world of health and education, and demonstrate the ways in which there may be overlaps in costs and outcomes. In short, there are likely to be situations in which the optimal multisectoral decision would be for individual sectors to increase their threshold in order to incorporate the spillover benefits of an intervention in another sector. The authors acknowledge that – in a perfect world – a social-welfare-maximising government would have sufficient information to allocate resources earmarked for specific purposes (e.g. health improvement) across sectors. But this doesn’t happen. Instead the authors propose the use of a cofinancing mechanism, whereby funds would be transferred between sectors as needed. The paper provides an interesting and thought-provoking discussion, and the idea of transferring funds between sectors seems sensible. Personally I think the problem is slightly misspecified. I don’t believe other sectors face thresholds in the same way, because (generally speaking) they do not employ cost-effectiveness analysis. And I’m not sure they should. I’m convinced that for health we need to deviate from welfarism, but I’m not convinced of it for other sectors. So from my perspective it is simply a matter of health vs everything else, and we can incorporate the ‘everything else’ into a cost-effectiveness analysis (with a societal perspective) in monetary terms. Funds can be reallocated as necessary with each budget statement (of which there seem to be a lot nowadays).

Is the Rational Addiction model inherently impossible to estimate? Journal of Health Economics [RePEc] Published 28th December 2016

Saddle point dynamics. Something I’ve never managed to get my head around, but here goes… This paper starts from the problem that empirical tests of the Rational Addiction model serve up wildly variable and often ridiculous (implied) discount rates. That may be part of the reason why economists tend to support the RA model but at the same time believe that it has not been empirically proven. The paper sets out the basis for saddle point dynamics in the context of the RA model, and outlines the nature of the stable and unstable root within the function that determines a person’s consumption over time. The authors employ Monte Carlo estimation of RA-type equations, simulating panel data observations. These simulations demonstrate that the presence of the unstable root may make it very difficult to estimate the coefficients. So even if the RA model can truly represent behaviour, empirical estimation may contradict it. This raises the question of whether the RA model is essentially untestable. A key feature of the argument relates to use of the model where a person’s time horizon is not considered to be infinite. Some non-health economists like to assume it is, which, as the authors wryly note, is not particularly ‘rational’.

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