Paul Mitchell’s journal round-up for 25th December 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Consensus-based cross-European recommendations for the identification, measurement and valuation of costs in health economic evaluations: a European Delphi study. European Journal of Health Economics [PubMedPublished 19th December 2017

The primary aim of this study was to develop guidelines for costing in economic evaluation studies conducted across more than one European country. The starting point of the societal perspective as the benchmark for costing was not entirely obvious from the abstract, where this broadest approach to costing is not recommended uniformly across all European countries. Recommendations following this starting point looked at the identification, measurement and valuation of resource use, discount rate and discounting of future costs. A three-step Delphi study was used to gain consensus on what should be included in an economic evaluation from a societal perspective, based initially on findings from a review of costing methodologies adopted across European country-specific guidelines. Consensus required at least two thirds (67%) agreement across those participating in the Delphi study at all 3 stages. Where no agreement was reached after the three stages, a panel of four of the co-authors made a final decision on what should be recommended. In total, 26 of the 110 invited to participate completed at least one Delphi round, with all Delphi rounds having at least 16 participants. It remains unclear to me if 16 for a Delphi round is sufficient to reach a European wide consensus on costing methodologies. There were a number of key areas where no consensus was reached (e.g. including costs unrelated to the intervention, measurement of resource use and absenteeism, and valuation of opportunity costs of patient time and informal care), so the four-strong author panel had a leading role on some of the main recommendations. Notwithstanding the limitations associated with the reference perspective taken and sample for the Delphi study and panel, the paper provides a useful illustration of the different approaches to costing across European countries. It also provides a good coverage of costing issues that need to be explained in detail in economic evaluations to allow for clear understanding of methods used and the underpinning rationale for those decisions where a choice is required on the costing methodology applied.

A (five-)level playing field for mental health conditions?: exploratory analysis of EQ-5D-5L derived utility values. Quality of Life Research [PubMedPublished 16th December 2017

The UK health economics community has been reeling from the decision made earlier this year by UK guidelines developer, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), who recommended to not adopt the new population values developed for the EQ-5D-5L version when calculating QALYs and instead rely on a crosswalk of the values developed over 20 years ago for the 3 level EQ-5D version. This paper provides a timely comparison of how these two value sets perform for the EQ-5D-5L descriptive system in patient groups with mental health conditions, groups often thought to be disadvantaged by the physical health functioning focus of the EQ-5D descriptive system. Using baseline data from three trials, the authors find that the new utility values produce a higher mean EQ-5D score of 0.08 compared to the old crosswalk values, with a 0.225 difference for those reporting extreme problems with the anxiety/depression dimension on EQ-5D. Although, the authors of this study highlight using these new values would increase cost per QALY results in this sample using scenario analysis, when improvements are in the depression/anxiety category only, such improvements are relatively better than across the whole EQ-5D-5L descriptive system due to the relative additional value placed on the anxiety/depression dimension in the new values. This paper makes for interesting reading and one that NICE should take into consideration when reviewing their decision on this issue next year. Although I would disagree with the authors when they state that this study would be a primary reason for revising the NICE cost-effectiveness threshold (more compelling arguments for this elsewhere in my view), it does clearly highlight the influence of the choice of descriptive system and the values used in the outcomes produced for economic analysis such as QALYs, even when the two descriptive systems in question (EQ-5D-3L and EQ-5D-5L) are roughly the same.

What characteristics of nursing homes are most valued by customers? A discrete choice experiment with residents and family members. Value in Health Published 1st December 2017

Our final paper for review in 2017 looks at the characteristics that are of most importance to individuals and their family members when it comes to nursing home provision. The authors conducted a valuation exercise using a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to calculate the relative importance of the attributes contained on the Consumer Choice Index-Six Dimension (CCI-6D), a measure developed to assess the quality of nursing home care across 3 levels on six domains: 1. level of time care staff spent with residents; 2. homeliness of shared spaces; 3. homeliness of room setup; 4. access to outside and garden; 5. frequency of meaningful activities; and 6. flexibility with care routines. Those who lived in a nursing home for at least a year with low levels of cognitive impairment completed the DCE themselves, whereas family members were asked to proxy for their close relative with more severe cognitive impairment. 126 residents and 416 family member proxies completed the DCE comparisons of nursing homes with different qualities in these six areas. The results of the DCE show differences in preferences across the two groups. Although similar importance is placed on some dimensions across both groups (i.e. “homeliness of room set up” ranked highly, whereas “frequency of meaningful activities” ranked lower), residents value access to outside and garden four times as much as the family proxies do (second most important dimension for residents, lowest for family proxies), family members value level of time care staff spent with residents twice as much as residents themselves (most important attribute for family proxies, third most important for residents). Although residents in both groups may have important differences in characteristics that might explain some of this difference, it is probably a good time of year to remember family preferences may be inconsistent with individuals within them, so make sure to take account of this variation when preparing those Christmas dinners.

Happy holidays all.

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Thesis Thursday: Caroline Vass

On the third Thursday of every month, we speak to a recent graduate about their thesis and their studies. This month’s guest is Dr Caroline Vass who has a PhD from the University of Manchester. If you would like to suggest a candidate for an upcoming Thesis Thursday, get in touch.

Title
Using discrete choice experiments to value benefits and risks in primary care
Supervisors
Katherine Payne, Stephen Campbell, Daniel Rigby
Repository link
https://www.escholar.manchester.ac.uk/uk-ac-man-scw:295629

Are there particular challenges associated with asking people to trade-off risks in a discrete choice experiment?

The challenge of communicating risk in general, not just in DCEs, was one of the things which drew me to the PhD. I’d heard a TED talk discussing a study which asked people’s understanding of weather forecasts. Although most people think they understand a simple statement like “there’s a 30% chance of rain tomorrow”, few people correctly interpreted that as meaning it will rain 30% of the days like tomorrow. Most interpret it to mean there will be rain 30% of the time or in 30% of the area.

My first ever publication was reviewing the risk communication literature, which confirmed our suspicions; even highly educated samples don’t always interpret information as we expect. Therefore, testing if the communication of risk mattered when making trade-offs in a DCE seemed a pretty important topic and formed the overarching research question of my PhD.

Most of your study used data relating to breast cancer screening. What made this a good context in which to explore your research questions?

All women are invited to participate in breast screening (either from a GP referral or at 47-50 years old) in the UK. This makes every woman a potential consumer and a potential ‘patient’. I conducted a lot of qualitative research to ensure the survey text was easily interpretable, and having a disease which many people had heard of made this easier and allowed us to focus on the risk communication formats. My supervisor Prof. Katherine Payne had also been working on a large evaluation of stratified screening which made contacting experts, patients and charities easier.

There are also national screening participation figures so we were able to test if the DCE had any real-world predictive value. Luckily, our estimates weren’t too far off the published uptake rates for the UK!

How did you come to use eye-tracking as a research method, and were there any difficulties in employing a method not widely used in our field?

I have to credit my supervisor Prof. Dan Rigby with planting the seed and introducing me to the method. I did a bit of reading into what psychologists thought you could measure using eye-movements and thought it was worth further investigation. I literally found people publishing with the technology at our institution and knocked on doors until someone would let me use it! If the University of Manchester didn’t already have the equipment, it would have been much more challenging to collect these data.

I then discovered the joys of lab-based work which I think many health economists, fortunately, don’t encounter in their PhDs. The shared bench, people messing with your experiment set-up, restricted lab time which needs to be booked weeks in advance etc. I’m sure it will all be worth it… when the paper is finally published.

What are the key messages from your research in terms of how we ought to be designing DCEs in this context?

I had a bit of a null-result on the risk communication formats, where I found it didn’t affect preferences. I think looking back that might have been with the types of numbers I was presenting (5%, 10%, 20% are easier to understand) and maybe people have a lot of knowledge about the risks of breast screening. It certainly warrants further research to see if my finding holds in other settings. There is a lot of support for visual risk communication formats like icon arrays in other literatures and their addition didn’t seem to do any harm.

Some of the most interesting results came from the think-aloud interviews I conducted with female members of the public. Although I originally wanted to focus on their interpretation of the risk attributes, people started verbalising all sorts of interesting behaviour and strategies. Some of it aligned with economic concepts I hadn’t thought of such as feelings of regret associated with opting-out and discounting both the costs and health benefits of later screens in the programme. But there were also some glaring violations, like ignoring certain attributes, associating cost with quality, using other people’s budget constraints to make choices, and trying to game the survey with protest responses. So perhaps people designing DCEs for benefit-risk trade-offs specifically or in healthcare more generally should be aware that respondents can and do adopt simplifying heuristics. Is this evidence of the benefits of qualitative research in this context? I make that argument here.

Your thesis describes a wealth of research methods and findings, but is there anything that you wish you could have done that you weren’t able to do?

Achieved a larger sample size for my eye-tracking study!

Meeting round-up: 7th Meeting of the International Academy of Health Preference Research

The 7th meeting of the International Academy of Health Preference Research (IAHPR) took place in Glasgow on Saturday 4th November 2017. The meeting was chaired by Karin Groothuis-Oudshoorn and Terry Flynn. It was preceded by a Friday afternoon symposium on the econometrics of heterogeneity, which I was unable to attend.

IAHPR is a relatively new organisation, describing itself as an ‘international network of multilingual, multidisciplinary researchers who contribute to the field of health preference research’. To minimise participants’ travel costs, IAHPR meetings are usually scheduled alongside major international conferences such as the meetings of iHEA, EuHEA and AHES (the Australian Health Economics Society). The November meeting took place just before the kick-off of the ISPOR European Congress (a behemoth by comparison). Most, but not all, of the attendees I spoke to, said that they would also be attending the ISPOR Congress.

The meeting was attended by 49 researchers from nine different countries. Nine were from the US, 16 from the UK, and 22 from elsewhere in the EU (sadly, I won’t be able to use the phrase ‘elsewhere in the EU’ for much longer). Understandably, the regional representation of the Glasgow meeting was quite different from that of the (July 2017) Boston meeting, where over 60% of the participants were based in the US.

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In total there were 12 podium presentations (half by student presenters) and about eight posters. Each podium presenter was allocated 12 minutes for their presentation and a further eight minutes for questions and group discussion. The poster authors were given the opportunity to briefly introduce themselves and their research to the group as part of an ‘elevator talks’ session.

Although all of the presentations focused on issues in stated preference research, the range of topics was quite broad, covering preferences between health outcomes, preferences between health services, conceptual and theoretical issues, experimental design approaches, and novel analytical techniques. Most of the studies presented applications of the DCE and best-worst scaling methods. Several presentations examined issues relating to preference heterogeneity and decision heuristics.

A personal highlight was Tabea Schmidt-Ott’s examination of the use of dominance tests to assess rational choice behaviour amongst survey respondents. She reported that such tests were included in a quarter of the health-related DCE studies published in 2015 (including many studies that had been led by IAHPR meeting attendees). Their inclusion had often been used to justify choices about which respondents to exclude from the final samples. Tabea concluded that dominance tests are a weak technique for assessing the rationality of people’s choice behaviour, as the observation of dominated choices can be explained by and accounted for in DCE models.

Overall, the IAHPR meeting was enjoyable and intellectually stimulating. The standard of the presentations and discussions was high, and it was a good forum for learning about the latest advances in stated preference research. It was quite DCE-dominated, so it would have been interesting to have had some representation from researchers who are sceptical about that methodology.

The next meeting will take place in Tasmania, to be chaired by Brendan Mulhern and Richard Norman.

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