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Economic Evaluation

Identifying the effect of expenditure on health outcomes: another small comment on Claxton et al

In a previous post I asked whether the study by Claxton et al can or should inform the cost-effectiveness threshold used by NICE. The authors argued that, “it is the expected health effects … of the average displacement within the… Read More »Identifying the effect of expenditure on health outcomes: another small comment on Claxton et al

Do we really need to change the cost-effectiveness threshold?

The cost-effectiveness threshold utilised by health technology assessment agencies, such as NICE in the United Kingdom, below which new medical technologies and interventions are considered cost-effective, is frequently discussed. NICE currently use a threshold of £20,000 to £30,000 per quality… Read More »Do we really need to change the cost-effectiveness threshold?

Bayesian evidence synthesis and bootstrapping for trial-based economic evaluations: comfortable bed fellows?

By Mohsen Sadatsafavi and Stirling Bryan In economic evaluation of health technologies, evidence synthesis is typically about quantification of the evidence in terms of parameters. Bootstrapping is a non-parametric inferential method in trial-based economic evaluations. On the surface the two… Read More »Bayesian evidence synthesis and bootstrapping for trial-based economic evaluations: comfortable bed fellows?

Bad science in health economics: complementary medicine, costs and mortality

By Chris Sampson, David Whitehurst and Andrew Street In December 2012, an article was published in The European Journal of Health Economics with the title ‘Patients whose GP knows complementary medicine tend to have lower costs and live longer’. We… Read More »Bad science in health economics: complementary medicine, costs and mortality