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Economic Evaluation

Bad science in health economics: complementary medicine, costs and mortality

By Chris Sampson, David Whitehurst and Andrew Street In December 2012, an article was published in The European Journal of Health Economics with the title ‘Patients whose GP knows complementary medicine tend to have lower costs and live longer’. We… Read More »Bad science in health economics: complementary medicine, costs and mortality

The potential of the super QALY to reconcile the key contentions in health economics

Economics is largely about trade-offs and compromise. Academics study the former but don’t often engage in the latter. In health economics, as in other fields, a key trade-off is between equity and efficiency. We’ve been studying this for a.very.long.time. Despite this, as… Read More »The potential of the super QALY to reconcile the key contentions in health economics

Cannabis and asbestos: The cost-effectiveness of prohibition as health policy

The aim of a health intervention is generally to cause a cost-effective increase to some normative outcome such as by reducing mortality, increasing productivity and so forth. Often policy makers want to encourage or discourage certain behaviours by using incentives… Read More »Cannabis and asbestos: The cost-effectiveness of prohibition as health policy