Ambulance and economics

I have recently been watching the BBC series AmbulanceIt is a fly-on-the-wall documentary following the West Midlands Ambulance Service interspersed with candid interviews with ambulance staff, much in the same vein as other health care documentaries like 24 Hours in A&EAs much as anything it provides a (stylised) look at the conditions on the ground for staff and illustrates how health care institutions are as much social institutions as essential services. In a recent episode, the cost of a hoax call was noted as some thousands of pounds. Indeed, the media and health services often talk about the cost of hoax calls in this way:

Warning for parents as one hoax call costs public £2,465 and diverts ambulance from real emergency call.

Frequent 999 callers cost NHS millions of pounds a year.

Nuisance caller cost the taxpayer £78,000 by making 408 calls to the ambulance service in two years.

But these are accounting costs, not the full economic cost. The first headline almost captures this by suggesting the opportunity cost was attendance at a real emergency call. However, given the way that ambulance resources are deployed and triaged across calls, it is very difficult to say what the opportunity cost is: what would be the marginal benefit of having an additional ambulance crew for the duration of a hoax call? What is the shadow price of an ambulance unit?

Few studies have looked at this question. The widely discussed study by Claxton et al. in the UK, looked at shadow prices of health care across different types of care, but noted that:

Expenditure on, for example, community care, A&E, ambulance services, and outpatients can be difficult to attribute to a particular [program budget category].

One review identified a small number of studies examining the cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness of emergency response services. Estimates of the marginal cost per life saved ranged from approximately $5,000 to $50,000. However, this doesn’t really tell us the impact of an additional crew, nor were many of these studies comparable in terms of the types of services they looked at, and these were all US-based.

There does exist the appropriately titled paper Ambulance EconomicsThis paper approaches the question we’re interested in, in the following way:

The centrepiece of our analysis is what we call the Ambulance Response Curve (ARC). This shows the relationship between the response time for an individual call (r) and the number of ambulances available and not in use (n) at the time the call was made. For example, let us suppose that 35 ambulances are on duty and 10 of them are being used. Then n has the value of 25 when the next call is taken. Ceteris paribus, as increases, we expect that r will fall.

On this basis, one can look at how an additional ambulance affects response times, on average. One might then be able to extrapolate the health effects of that delay. This paper suggests that an additional ambulance would reduce response times by around nine seconds on average for the service they looked at – not actually very much. However, the data are 20 years old, and significant changes to demand and supply over that period are likely to have a large effect on the ARC. Nevertheless, changes in response time of the order of minutes are required in order to have a clinically significant impact on survival, which are unlikely to occur with one additional ambulance.

Taken altogether, the opportunity cost of a hoax call is not likely to be large. This is not to downplay the stupidity of such calls, but it is perhaps reassuring that lives are not likely to be in the balance and is a testament to the ability of the service to appropriately deploy their limited resources.

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Sam Watson’s journal round-up for 2nd October 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

The path to longer and healthier lives for all Africans by 2030: the Lancet Commission on the future of health in sub-Saharan Africa. The Lancet [PubMedPublished 13th September 2017

The African continent has the highest rates of economic growth, the fastest growing populations and rates of urbanisation, but also the highest burden of disease. The challenges for public health and health care provision are great. It is no surprise then that this Lancet commission on the future of health in Sub-Saharan Africa runs to 57 pages yet still has some notable absences. In the space of a few hundred words, it would be impossible to fully discuss the topics in this tome, these will appear in future blog posts. For now, I want to briefly discuss a lack of consideration of the importance of political economy in the Commission’s report. For example, the report notes the damaging effects of IMF and World Bank structural adjustment programs in the 70s and 80s. These led to a dismantling of much of the public sector in indebted African nations in order for them to qualify for further loans. However, these issues have not gone away. Despite strongly emphasizing that countries in Africa must increase their health spending, it does not mention that many countries spend much more servicing debt than on public health and health care. Kenya, for example, will soon no longer qualify for aid as it becomes a middle-income country, and yet it spends almost double (around $6 billion) servicing its debt than it does on health care (around $3 billion). Debt reform and relief may be a major step towards increasing health expenditure. The inequalities in access to basic health services reflect the disparities in income and wealth both between and within countries. The growth of slums across the continent is stark evidence of this. Residents of these communities, despite often facing the worst exposure to major disease risk factors, are often not recognised by authorities and cannot access health services. Even where health services are available there are still difficulties with access. A lack of regulation and oversight can lead the growth of a rentier class within slums as those with access to small amounts of capital, land, or property act as petty landlords. So while some in slum areas can afford the fees for basic health services, the poorest still face a barrier even when services are available. These people are also those who have little access to decent water and sanitation or education and have the highest risk of disease. Finally, the lack of incentives for trained doctors and medical staff to work in poor or rural areas is also identified as a key problem. Many doctors either leave for wealthier countries or work in urban areas. Doctors are often a powerful interest group and can influence macro health policy, distorting it to favour richer urban areas. Political solutions are required, as well as the public health interventions more widely discussed. The Commission’s report is extensive and worth the time to read for anyone with an interest in the subject matter. What also becomes clear upon reading it is the lack of solid evidence on health systems and what works and does not work. From an economic perspective, much of the evidence pertaining to health system functioning and efficiency is still just the results from country-level panel data regressions, which tell us very little about what is actually happening. This results in us being able to identify areas needed for reform with very little idea of how.

The relationship of health insurance and mortality: is lack of insurance deadly? Annals of Internal Medicine [PubMedPublished 19th September 2017

One sure-fire way of increasing your chances of publishing in a top-ranked journal is to do something on a hot political topic. In the UK this has been seven-day services, as well as other issues relating to deficiencies of supply. In the US, health insurance is right up there with the Republicans trying to repeal the Affordable Care Act, a.k.a. Obamacare. This paper systematically reviews the literature on the relationship between health insurance coverage and the risk of mortality. The theory being that health insurance permits access to medical services and therefore treatment and prevention measures that reduce the risk of death. Many readers will be familiar with the Oregon Health Insurance Experiment, in which the US state of Oregon distributed access to increased Medicaid expansion by lottery, therein creating an RCT. This experiment, which takes a top spot in the review, estimated that those who had ‘won’ the lottery had a mortality rate 0.032 percentage points lower than the ‘losers’, whose mortality rate was 0.8%; a relative reduction of around 4%. Similar results were found for the quasi-experimental studies included, and slightly larger effects were found in cohort follow-up studies. These effects are small. But then so is the baseline. Most of these studies only examined non-elderly, non-disabled people, who would otherwise not qualify for any other public health insurance. For people under 45 in the US, the leading cause of death is unintentional injury, and its only above this age that cancer becomes the leading cause of death. If you suffer major trauma in the US you will (for the most part) be treated in an ER insured or uninsured, even if you end up with a large bill afterwards. So it’s no surprise that the effects of insurance coverage on mortality are very small for these people. This is probably the inappropriate endpoint to be looking at for this study. Indeed, the Oregon experiment found that the biggest differences were in reduced out-of-pocket expenses and medical debt, and improved self-reported health. The review’s conclusion that, “The odds of dying among the insured relative to the uninsured is 0.71 to 0.97,” is seemingly unwarranted. If they want to make a political point about the need for insurance, they’re looking in the wrong place.

Smoking, expectations, and health: a dynamic stochastic model of lifetime smoking behavior. Journal of Political Economy [RePEcPublished 24th August 2017

I’ve long been sceptical of mathematical models of complex health behaviours. The most egregious of which is often the ‘rational addiction’ literature. Originating with the late Gary Becker, the rational addiction model, in essence, assumes that addiction is a rational choice made by utility maximising individuals, whose preferences alter with use of a particular drug. The biggest problem I find with this approach is that it is completely out of touch with the reality of addiction and drug dependence, and makes absurd assumptions about the preferences of addicts. Nevertheless, it has spawned a sizable literature. And, one may argue that the model is useful if it makes accurate predictions, regardless of the assumptions underlying it. On this front, I have yet to be convinced. This paper builds a rational addiction-type model for smoking to examine whether learning of one’s health risks reduces smoking. As an illustration of why I dislike this method of understanding addictive behaviours, the authors note that “…the model cannot explain why individuals start smoking. […] The estimated preference parameters in the absence of a chronic illness suggest that, for a never smoker under the age of 25, there is no incentive to begin smoking because the marginal utility of smoking is negative.” But for many, social and cultural factors simply explain why young people start smoking. The weakness of the deductive approach to social science seems to rear its head, but like I said, the aim here may be the development of good predictive models. And, the model does appear to predict smoking behaviour well. However, it is all in-sample prediction, and with the number of parameters it is not surprising it predicts well. This discussion is not meant to be completely excoriating. What is interesting is the discussion and attempt to deal with the endogeneity of smoking – people in poor health may be more likely to smoke and so the estimated effects of smoking on longevity may be overestimated. As a final point of contention though, I’m still trying to work out what the “addictive stock of smoking capital” is.

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Sam Watson’s journal round-up for 7th August 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Financing transformative health systems towards achievement of the health Sustainable Development Goals: a model for projected resource needs in 67 low-income and middle-income countries. Lancet: Global Health [PubMedPublished 17th July 2017

Achieving universal health coverage is a key aspect of the UN’s sustainable development goals. However, what this means in practice is complicated. People need to be able to access health services free at the point of use, but once those services are accessed there needs to be sufficient labour, capital, skill, and quality to correctly diagnose and treat them. For many health systems worldwide, this will require large investments in infrastructure and staffing, but the potential cost of achieving these goals is unclear. This article sets out to estimate these costs. Clearly, this is a complicated task – health care systems are incredibly complex. From a basic microeconomic standpoint, one might need some understanding of the production function of different health care systems, and the marginal productivity of labour and capital inputs to these systems. There is generally good evidence of what is effective and cost-effective for the treatment of different diseases, and so given the amenable disease burden for a particular country, we could begin to understand what would be required to combat it. This is how this article tackles this question, more or less. They take a bottom-up costing approach to a wide range of interventions, governance requirements, and, where required, other interventions such as water and sanitation. However, there are other mechanisms at play. At national levels, economies of scale and scope play a role. Integration of care programs can reduce the costs, improve the quality, or both, of the individual programs. Similarly, the levels of investment considered are likely to have relevant macroeconomic effects, boosting employment, income, and subsequent socioeconomic indicators. Credit is due to the authors, they do consider financing and health impacts of investment, and their paper is the most comprehensive to date on the topic. However, their projections (~$300 billion annually) are perhaps more uncertain than they let on, a criticism I made of similar papers recently. While I should remind myself not to let the perfect be the enemy of the good, detailed case studies of particular countries may help me to see how the spreadsheet model may actually translate into real-world changes.

Precommitment, cash transfers, and timely arrival for birth: evidence from a randomized controlled trial in Nairobi Kenya. American Economic Review [RePEcPublished May 2017

A great proportion of the gains in life expectancy in recent years has been through the reduction of childhood mortality. The early years of life are some of the most precarious. A newborn child, if she survives past five years of age, will not face the same risk of dying until late adulthood. Many of the same risk factors that contribute to childhood mortality also contribute to maternal death rates and many low-income countries still face unacceptably high rates of dying for both mother and child. One way of tackling this is to ensure mothers have access to adequate antenatal and postnatal care. In Kenya, for example, the government legislated to provide free delivery services in government health facilities in 2013. However, Kenya still has some of the highest death rates for mother and child in the world. It is speculated that one reason for this is the delay in receiving services in the case of complications with a pregnancy. A potential cause of this delay in Nairobi is a lack of adequate planning from women who face a large number of heterogeneous treatment options for birth. This study presents an RCT in which pregnant women were offered a “precommitment transfer package”, which consisted of a cash transfer of 1000 KSh (~£7) during pregnancy and a further 1000 KSh if women stuck to a delivery plan they had earlier committed to. The transfer was found to increase the proportion of women arriving early to delivery facilities. The study was a fairly small pilot study and the results somewhat uncertain, but the intervention appears promising. Cost-effectiveness comparisons are warranted with other interventions aiming to achieve the same ends.

Bans on electronic cigarette sales to minors and smoking among high school students. Journal of Health Economics [PubMedPublished July 2017

E-cigarettes have provoked quite a debate among public health researchers and campaigners as we’ve previously discussed. E-cigarettes are a substitute for tobacco smoking and are likely to be significantly less harmful. They may have contributed to large declines in the use of tobacco in the UK in the last few years. However, some have taken a “think of the children!” position. While e-cigarette use per se among adolescents may not be a significant public health issue, it could lead to increased use of tobacco. Others have countered that those young people using e-cigarettes would have been those that used tobacco anyway, so banning e-cigarettes among minors may lead them to go back to the tobacco. This paper takes data from repeated surveys of high school students in the US to estimate the effects of banning the sale of e-cigarettes to minors on the prevalence of tobacco smoking. Interestingly, bans appear to reduce tobacco smoking prevalence; the results appear fairly robust and the modelling is sensible. This conflicts with other recent similar studies. The authors argue that this shows that e-cigarettes and tobacco smoking are complements, so reducing one reduces the other. But I am not sure this explains the decline since no increase in youth smoking was observed as e-cigarettes became more popular. Certainly, such a ban would not have reduced smoking prevalence years ago. At the very least e-cigarettes have clearly had a significant effect on attitudes towards smoking. Perhaps smoking was on the decline anyway – but the authors estimate a model with state-specific time trends, and no declines were seen in control states. Whatever our prior beliefs about the efficacy of regulating or banning e-cigarettes, the evidence is complex, reflecting the complex behaviour of people towards drugs, alcohol, and tobacco.

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