Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 24th April 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

The association between socioeconomic status and adult fast-food consumption in the U.S. Economics & Human Biology Published 19th April 2017

It’s an old stereotype, that people of lower socioeconomic status eat a lot of fast food, and that this contributes to poorer nutritional intake and therefore poorer health. As somebody with a deep affection for Gregg’s pasties and Pot Noodles, I’ve never really bought into the idea. Mainly because a lot of fast food isn’t particularly cheap. And anyway, what about all those cheesy paninis that the middle classes are chowing down on in Starbuck’s? Plus, wouldn’t the more well-off folk have a higher opportunity cost of time that would make fast food more attractive? Happily for me, this paper provides some evidence to support these notions. The study uses 3 recent waves of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, with 8136 participants born between 1957 and 1964. The authors test for an income gradient in adult fast food consumption, as well as any relationship to wealth. I think that makes it extra interesting because wealth is likely to be more indicative of social class (which is probably what people really think about when it comes to the stereotype). The investigation of wealth also sets it apart from previous studies, which report mixed findings for the income gradient. The number of times people consumed fast food in the preceding 7 days is modelled as a function of price, time requirement, preferences and monetary resources (income and wealth). The models included estimators for these predictors and a number of health behaviour indicators and demographic variables. Logistic models distinguish fast food eaters and OLS and negative binomial models estimate how often fast food is eaten. 79% ate fast food at least once, and 23% were frequent fast food eaters. In short, there isn’t much variation by income and wealth. What there is suggests an inverted U-shape pattern, which is more pronounced when looking at income than wealth. The regression results show that there isn’t much of a relationship between wealth and the number of times a respondent ate fast food. Income is positively related to the number of fast food meals eaten. But other variables were far more important. Living in a central city and being employed were associated with greater fast food consumption, while a tendency to check ingredients was associated with a lower probability of eating fast food. The study has some important policy implications, particularly as our preconceptions may mean that interventions are targeting the wrong groups of people.

Views of the UK general public on important aspects of health not captured by EQ-5D. The Patient [PubMed] Published 13th April 2017

The notion that the EQ-5D might not reflect important aspects of health-related quality of life is a familiar one for those of us working on trial-based analyses. Some of the claims we hear might just be special pleading, but it’s hard to deny at least some truth. What really matters – if we’re trying to elicit societal values – is what the public thinks. This study tries to find out. Face-to-face interviews were conducted in which people completed time trade-off and discrete choice experiment tasks for EQ-5D-5L states. These were followed by a set of questions about the value of alternative upper anchors (e.g. ‘full health’, ‘11111’) and whether respondents believed that relevant health or quality of life domains were missing from the EQ-5D questionnaire. This paper focuses on the aspects of health that people identified as being missing, using a content analysis framework. There were 436 respondents, about half of whom reported being in a 11111 EQ-5D state. 41% of participants considered the EQ-5D questionnaire to be missing some important aspect of health. The authors identified 22 (!) different themes and attached people’s responses to these themes. Sensory deprivation and mental health were the two biggies, with many more responses than other themes. 50 people referred to vision, hearing or other sensory loss. 29 referred to mental health generally while 28 referred to specific mental health problems. This study constitutes a guide for future research and for the development of the EQ-5D and other classification systems. Obviously, the objective of the EQ-5D is not to reflect all domains. And it may be that the public’s suggestions – verbatim, at least – aren’t sensible. 10 people stated ‘cancer’, for example. But the importance of mental health and sensory deprivation in describing the evaluative space does warrant further investigation.

Re-thinking ‘The different perspectives that can be used when eliciting preferences in health’. Health Economics [PubMed] Published 21st March 2017

Pedantry is a virtue when it comes to valuing health states, which is why you’ll often find me banging on about the need for clarity. And why I like this paper. The authors look at a 2003 article by Dolan and co that outlined the different perspectives that health preference researchers ought to be using (though notably aren’t) when presenting elicitation questions to respondents. Dolan and co defined 6 perspectives along two dimensions: preferences (personal, social and socially-inclusive personal) and context (ex ante and ex post). This paper presents the argument that Dolan and co’s framework is incomplete. The authors throw new questions into the mix regarding who the user of treatment is, who the payer is and who is assessing the value, as well as introducing consideration of the timing of illness and the nature of risk. This gives rise to a total of 23 different perspectives along the dimensions of preferences (personal, social, socially-inclusive personal, non-use and proxy) and context (4 ex ante and 1 ex post). This new classification makes important distinctions between different perspectives, and health preference researchers really ought to heed its advice. However, I still think it’s limited. As I described in a recent blog post and discussed at a recent HESG meeting, I think the way we talk about ex ante and ex post in this context is very confused. In fact, this paper demonstrates the problem nicely. The authors first discuss the ex post context, the focus being on the value of ‘treatment’ (an event). Then the paper moves on to the ex ante context, and the discussion relates to ‘illness’ (a state). The problem is that health state valuation exercises aren’t (explicitly) about valuing treatments – or illnesses – but about valuing health states in relation to other health states. ‘Ex ante’ means making judgements about something before an event, and ‘ex post’ means to do so after it. But we’re trying to conduct health state valuation, not health event valuation. May the pedantry continue.

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Sam Watson’s journal round-up for 6th March 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

It’s good to be first: order bias in reading and citing NBER working papers. The Review of Economics and Statistics [RePEcPublished 23rd February 2017

Each week one of the authors at this blog choose three or four recently published studies to summarise and briefly discuss. Making this choice from the many thousands of articles published every week can be difficult. I browse those journals that publish in my area and search recently published economics papers on PubMed and Econlit for titles that pique my interest. But this strategy is not without its own flaws as this study aptly demonstrates. When making a choice among many alternatives, people aren’t typically presented with a set of choices, rather a list. This arises in healthcare as well. In an effort to promote competition, at least in the UK, patients are presented with a list of possible of providers and some basic information about those providers. We recently covered a paper that explored this expansion of choice ‘sets’ and investigated its effects on quality. We have previously criticised the use of such lists. People often skim these lists relying on simple heuristics to make choices. This article shows that for the weekly email of new papers published by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), being listed first leads to an increase of approximately 30% in downloads and citations, despite the essentially random ordering of the list. This is certainly not the first study to illustrate the biases in human decision making, but it shows that this journal round-up may not be a fair reflection of the literature, and providing more information about healthcare providers may not have the impact on quality that might be hypothesised.

Economic conditions, illicit drug use, and substance use disorders in the United States. Journal of Health Economics [PubMed] Published March 2017

We have featured a large number of papers about the relationship between macroeconomic conditions and health and health-related behaviours on this blog. It is certainly one of the health economic issues du jour and one we have discussed in detail. Generally speaking, when looking at an aggregate level, such as countries or states, all-cause mortality appears to be pro-cyclical: it declines in economic downturns. Whereas an examination at individual or household levels suggest unemployment and reduced income is generally bad for health. It is certainly possible to reconcile these two effects as any discussion of Simpson’s paradox will reveal. This study takes the aggregate approach to looking at US state-level unemployment rates and their relationship with drug use. It’s relevant to the discussion around economic conditions and health; the US has seen soaring rates of opiate-related deaths recently, although whether this is linked to the prevailing economic conditions remains to be seen. Unfortunately, this paper predicates a lot of its discussion about whether there is an effect on whether there was statistical significance, a gripe we’ve contended with previously. And there are no corrections for multiple comparisons, despite the well over 100 hypothesis tests that are conducted. That aside, the authors conclude that the evidence suggests that use of ecstasy and heroin is procyclical with respect to unemployment (i.e increase with greater unemployment) and LSD, crack cocaine, and cocaine use is counter-cyclical. The results appear robust to the model specifications they compare, but I find it hard to reconcile some of the findings with the prior information about how people actually consume drugs. Many drugs are substitutes and/or compliments for one another. For example, many heroin users began using opiates through abuse of prescription drugs such as oxycodone but made the switch as heroin is generally much cheaper. Alcohol and marijuana have been shown to be substitutes for one another. All of this suggesting a lack of independence between the different outcomes considered. People may also lose their job because of drug use. Taken all together I remain a little sceptical of the conclusions from the study, but it is nevertheless an interesting and timely piece of research.

Child-to-adult neurodevelopmental and mental health trajectories after early life deprivation: the young adult follow-up of the longitudinal English and Romanian Adoptees study. The Lancet [PubMedPublished 22nd February 2017

Does early life deprivation lead to later life mental health issues? A question that is difficult to answer with observational data. Children from deprived backgrounds may be predisposed to mental health issues, perhaps through familial inheritance. To attempt to discern whether deprivation in early life is a cause of mental health issues this paper uses data derived from a cohort of Romanian children who spent time in one of the terribly deprived institutions of Ceaușescu’s Romania and who were later adopted by British families. These institutions were characterised by poor hygiene, inadequate food, and lack of social or educational stimulation. A cohort of British adoptees was used for comparison. For children who spent more than six months in one of the deprived institutions, there was a large increase in cognitive and social problems in later life compared with either British adoptees or those who spent less than six months in an institution. The evidence is convincing, with differences being displayed across multiple dimensions of mental health, and a clear causal mechanism by which deprivation acts. However, for this and many other studies that I write about on this blog, a disclaimer might be needed when there is significant (pun intended) abuse and misuse of p-values. Ziliak and McClosky’s damning diatribe on p-values, The Cult of Statistical Significance, presents examples of lists of p-values being given completely out of context, with no reference to the model or hypothesis test they are derived from, and with the implication that they represent whether an effect exists or not. This study does just that. I’ll leave you with this extract from the abstract:

Cognitive impairment in the group who spent more than 6 months in an institution remitted from markedly higher rates at ages 6 years (p=0·0001) and 11 years (p=0·0016) compared with UK controls, to normal rates at young adulthood (p=0·76). By contrast, self-rated emotional symptoms showed a late onset pattern with minimal differences versus UK controls at ages 11 years (p=0·0449) and 15 years (p=0·17), and then marked increases by young adulthood (p=0·0005), with similar effects seen for parent ratings. The high deprivation group also had a higher proportion of people with low educational achievement (p=0·0195), unemployment (p=0·0124), and mental health service use (p=0·0120, p=0·0032, and p=0·0003 for use when aged <11 years, 11–14 years, and 15–23 years, respectively) than the UK control group.

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Sam Watson’s journal round-up for 10th October 2016

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

This week’s journal round up-is a special edition featuring a series of papers on health econometrics published in this month’s issue of the Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series A.

Healthcare facility choice and user fee abolition: regression discontinuity in a multinomial choice setting. JRSS: A [RePEcPublished October 2016

Charges for access to healthcare – user fees – present a potential barrier to patients in accessing medical services. User fees were touted in the 1980s as a way to provide revenue for healthcare services in low and middle income countries, improve quality, and reduce overuse of limited services. However, a growing evidence base suggests that user fees do not achieve these ends and reduce uptake of preventative and curative services. This article seeks to provide new evidence on the topic using a regression discontinuity (RD) design while also exploring the use of RD with multinomial outcomes. Based on South African data, the discontinuity of interest is that children under the age of six are eligible for free public healthcare whereas older children must pay a fee; user fees for the under sixes were abolished following the end of apartheid in 1994. The results provide evidence that removal of user fees resulted in more patients using public healthcare facilities than costly private care or care at home. The authors describe how their non-parametric model performs better, in terms of out-of-sample predictive performance, than the parametric model. And when the non-parametric model is applied to examine treatment effects across income quantiles we find that the treatment effect is among poorer families and that it is principally due to them switching between home care and public healthcare. This analysis supports an already substantial literature on user fees, but a literature that has previously been criticised for a lack of methodological rigour, so this paper makes a welcome addition.

Do market incentives for hospitals affect health and service utilization?: evidence from prospective pay system–diagnosis-related groups tariffs in Italian regions. JRSS: A [RePEcPublished October 2016

The effect of pro-market reforms in the healthcare sector on hospital quality is a contentious and oft-discussed topic, not least due to the difficulties with measuring quality. We critically discussed a recent, prominent paper that analysed competitive reforms in the English NHS, for example. This article examines the effect of increased competition in Italy on health service utlisation: in the mid 1990s the Italian national health service moved from a system of national tariffs to region-specific tariffs in order for regions to better incentivise local health objectives and reflect production costs. For example, the tariffs for a vaginal delivery ranged from €697 to €1,750 in 2003. This variation between regions and over time provides a source of variation to analyse the effects of these reforms. The treatment is defined as a binary variable at each time point for whether the regions had switched from national to local tariffs, although one might suggest that this disposes of some interesting variation in how the policy was enacted. The headline finding is that the reforms had little or no effect on health, but did reduce utilisation of healthcare services. The authors interpret this as suggesting they reduce over-utilisation and hence improve efficiency. However, I am still pondering how this might work: presumably the marginal benefit of treating patients who do not require particular services is reduced, although the marginal cost of treating those patients who do not need it is likely also to be lower as they are healthier. The between-region differences in tariffs may well shed some light on this.

Short- and long-run estimates of the local effects of retirement on health. JRSS: A [RePEcPublished October 2016

The proportion of the population that is retired is growing. Governments have responded by increasing the retirement age to ensure the financial sustainability of pension schemes. But, retirement may have other consequences, not least on health. If retirement worsens one’s health then delaying the retirement age may improve population health, and if retirement is good for you, the opposite may occur. Retirement grants people a new lease of free time, which they may fill with health promoting activities, or the loss of activity and social relations may adversely impact on ones health and quality of life. In addition, people who are less healthy may be more likely to retire. Taken all together, estimating the effects of retirement on health presents an interesting statistical challenge with important implications for policy. This article uses the causal inference method du jour, regression discontinuity design, and the data are from that workhorse of British economic studies, the British Household Panel Survey. The discontinuity is obviously the retirement age; to deal with the potential reverse causality, eligibility for the state pension is used as an instrument. Overall the results suggest that the short term impact on health is minimal, although it does increase the risk of a person becoming sedentary, which in the long run may precipitate health problems.

 

Other articles on health econometrics in this special issue:

The association between asymmetric information, hospital competition and quality of healthcare: evidence from Italy.

This paper finds evidence that increased between hospital competition does not lead to improved outcomes as patients were choosing hospitals on the basis of information from their social networks. We featured this paper in a previous round-up.

A quasi-Monte-Carlo comparison of parametric and semiparametric regression methods for heavy-tailed and non-normal data: an application to healthcare costs.

This article considers the problem of modelling non-normally distributed healthcare costs data. Linear models with square root transformations and generalised linear models with square root link functions are found to perform the best.

Phantoms never die: living with unreliable population data.

Not strictly health econometrics, more demographics, this article explores how to make inferences about population mortality rates and trends when there are unreliable population data due to fluctuations in birth patterns. For researchers using macro health outcomes data, such corrections may prove useful.

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