Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 31st July 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

An exploratory study on using principal-component analysis and confirmatory factor analysis to identify bolt-on dimensions: the EQ-5D case study. Value in Health Published 14th July 2017

I’m not convinced by the idea of using bolt-on dimensions for multi-attribute utility instruments. A state description with a bolt-on refers to a different evaluative space, and therefore is not comparable with the progenitor, thus undermining its purpose. Maybe this study will persuade me otherwise. The authors analyse data from the Multi Instrument Comparison database, including responses to EQ-5D-5L, SF-6D, HUI3, AQoL 8D and 15D questionnaires, as well as the ICECAP and 3 measures of subjective well-being. Content analysis was used to allocate items from the measures to underlying constructs of health-related quality of life. The sample of 8022 was randomly split, with one half used for principal-component analysis and confirmatory factor analysis, and the other used for validation. This approach looks at the underlying constructs associated with health-related quality of life and the extent to which individual items from the questionnaires influence them. Candidate items for bolt-ons are those items from questionnaires other than the EQ-5D that are important and not otherwise captured by the EQ-5D questions. The principal-component analysis supported a 9-component model: physical functioning, psychological symptoms, satisfaction, pain, relationships, speech/cognition, hearing, energy/sleep and vision. The EQ-5D only covered physical functioning, psychological symptoms and pain. Therefore, items from measures that explain the other 6 components represent bolt-on candidates for the EQ-5D. This study succeeds in its aim. It demonstrates what appears to be a meaningful quantitative approach to identifying items not fully captured by the EQ-5D, which might be added as bolt-ons. But it doesn’t answer the question of which (if any) of these bolt-ons ought to be added, or in what circumstances. That would at least require pre-definition of the evaluative space, which might not correspond to the authors’ chosen model of health-related quality of life. If it does, then these findings would be more persuasive as a reason to do away with the EQ-5D altogether.

Endogenous information, adverse selection, and prevention: implications for genetic testing policy. Journal of Health Economics Published 13th July 2017

If you can afford it, there are all sorts of genetic tests available nowadays. Some of them could provide valuable information about the risk of particular health problems in the future. Therefore, they can be used to guide individuals’ decisions about preventive care. But if the individual’s health care is financed through insurance, that same information could prove costly. It could reinforce that classic asymmetry of information and adverse selection problem. So we need policy that deals with this. This study considers the incentives and insurance market outcomes associated with four policy options: i) mandatory disclosure of test results, ii) voluntary disclosure, iii) insurers knowing the test was taken, but not the results and iv) complete ban on the use of test information by insurers. The authors describe a utility model that incorporates the use of prevention technologies, and available insurance contracts, amongst people who are informed or uninformed (according to whether they have taken a test) and high or low risk (according to test results). This is used to estimate the value of taking a genetic test, which differs under the four different policy options. Under voluntary disclosure, the information from a genetic test always has non-negative value to the individual, who can choose to only tell their insurer if it’s favourable. The analysis shows that, in terms of social welfare, mandatory disclosure is expected to be optimal, while an information ban is dominated by all other options. These findings are in line with previous studies, which were less generalisable according to the authors. In the introduction, the authors state that “ethical issues are beyond the scope of this paper”. That’s kind of a problem. I doubt anybody who supports an information ban does so on the basis that they think it will maximise social welfare in the fashion described in this paper. More likely, they’re worried about the inequities in health that mandatory disclosure could reinforce, about which this study tells us nothing. Still, an information ban seems to be a popular policy, and studies like this indicate that such decisions should be reconsidered in light of their expected impact on social welfare.

Returns to scientific publications for pharmaceutical products in the United States. Health Economics [PubMedPublished 10th July 2017

Publication bias is a big problem. Part of the cause is that pharmaceutical companies have no incentive to publish negative findings for their own products. Though positive findings may be valuable in terms of sales. As usual, it isn’t quite that simple when you really think about it. This study looks at the effect of publications on revenue for 20 branded drugs in 3 markets – statins, rheumatoid arthritis and asthma – using an ‘event-study’ approach. The authors analyse a panel of quarterly US sales data from 2003-2013 alongside publications identified through literature searches and several drug- and market-specific covariates. Effects are estimated using first difference and difference in first difference models. The authors hypothesise that publications should have an important impact on sales in markets with high generic competition, and less in those without or with high branded competition. Essentially, this is what they find. For statins and asthma drugs, where there was some competition, clinical studies in high-impact journals increased sales to the tune of $8 million per publication. For statins, volume was not significantly affected, with mediation through price. In rhematoid arthritis, where competition is limited, the effect on sales was mediated by the effect on volume. Studies published in lower impact journals seemed to have a negative influence. Cost-effectiveness studies were only important in the market with high generic competition, increasing statin sales by $2.2 million on average. I’d imagine that these impacts are something with which firms already have a reasonable grasp. But this study provides value to public policy decision makers. It highlights those situations in which we might expect manufacturers to publish evidence and those in which it might be worthwhile increasing public investment to pick up the slack. It could also help identify where publication bias might be a bigger problem due to the incentives faced by pharmaceutical companies.

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Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 22nd May 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

The effect of health care expenditure on patient outcomes: evidence from English neonatal care. Health Economics [PubMed] Published 12th May 2017

Recently, people have started trying to identify opportunity cost in the NHS, by assessing the health gains associated with current spending. Studies have thrown up a wide range of values in different clinical areas, including in neonatal care. This study uses individual-level data for infants treated in 32 neonatal intensive care units from 2009-2013, along with the NHS Reference Cost for an intensive care cot day. A model is constructed to assess the impact of changes in expenditure, controlling for a variety of variables available in the National Neonatal Research Database. Two outcomes are considered: the in-hospital mortality rate and morbidity-free survival. The main finding is that a £100 increase in the cost per cot day is associated with a reduction in the mortality rate of 0.36 percentage points. This translates into a marginal cost per infant life saved of around £420,000. Assuming an average life expectancy of 81 years, this equates to a present value cost per life year gained of £15,200. Reductions in the mortality rate are associated with similar increases in morbidity. The estimated cost contradicts a much higher estimate presented in the Claxton et al modern classic on searching for the threshold.

A comparison of four software programs for implementing decision analytic cost-effectiveness models. PharmacoEconomics [PubMed] Published 9th May 2017

Markov models: TreeAge vs Excel vs R vs MATLAB. This paper compares the alternative programs in terms of transparency and validation, the associated learning curve, capability, processing speed and cost. A benchmarking assessment is conducted using a previously published model (originally developed in TreeAge). Excel is rightly identified as the ‘ubiquitous workhorse’ of cost-effectiveness modelling. It’s transparent in theory, but in practice can include cell relations that are difficult to disentangle. TreeAge, on the other hand, includes valuable features to aid model transparency and validation, though the workings of the software itself are not always clear. Being based on programming languages, MATLAB and R may be entirely transparent but challenging to validate. The authors assert that TreeAge is the easiest to learn due to its graphical nature and the availability of training options. Save for complex VBA, Excel is also simple to learn. R and MATLAB are equivalently more difficult to learn, but clearly worth the time saving for anybody expecting to work on multiple complex modelling studies. R and MATLAB both come top in terms of capability, with Excel falling behind due to having fewer statistical facilities. TreeAge has clearly defined capabilities limited to the features that the company chooses to support. MATLAB and R were both able to complete 10,000 simulations in a matter of seconds, while Excel took 15 minutes and TreeAge took over 4 hours. For a value of information analysis requiring 1000 runs, this could translate into 6 months for TreeAge! MATLAB has some advantage over R in processing time that might make its cost ($500 for academics) worthwhile to some. Excel and TreeAge are both identified as particularly useful as educational tools for people getting to grips with the concepts of decision modelling. Though the take-home message for me is that I really need to learn R.

Economic evaluation of factorial randomised controlled trials: challenges, methods and recommendations. Statistics in Medicine [PubMed] Published 3rd May 2017

Factorial trials randomise participants to at least 2 alternative levels (for example, different doses) of at least 2 alternative treatments (possibly in combination). Very little has been written about how economic evaluations ought to be conducted alongside such trials. This study starts by outlining some key challenges for economic evaluation in this context. First, there may be interactions between combined therapies, which might exist for costs and QALYs even if not for the primary clinical endpoint. Second, transformation of the data may not be straightforward, for example, it may not be possible to disaggregate a net benefit estimation with its components using alternative transformations. Third, regression analysis of factorial trials may be tricky for the purpose of constructing CEACs and conducting value of information analysis. Finally, defining the study question may not be simple. The authors simulate a 2×2 factorial trial (0 vs A vs B vs A+B) to demonstrate these challenges. The first analysis compares A and B against placebo separately in what’s known as an ‘at-the-margins’ approach. Both A and B are shown to be cost-effective, with the implication that A+B should be provided. The next analysis uses regression, with interaction terms demonstrating the unlikelihood of being statistically significant for costs or net benefit. ‘Inside-the-table’ analysis is used to separately evaluate the 4 alternative treatments, with an associated loss in statistical power. The findings of this analysis contradict the findings of the at-the-margins analysis. A variety of regression-based analyses is presented, with the discussion focussed on the variability in the estimated standard errors and the implications of this for value of information analysis. The authors then go on to present their conception of the ‘opportunity cost of ignoring interactions’ as a new basis for value of information analysis. A set of 14 recommendations is provided for people conducting economic evaluations alongside factorial trials, which could be used as a bolt-on to CHEERS and CONSORT guidelines.

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Thesis Thursday: Raymond Oppong

On the third Thursday of every month, we speak to a recent graduate about their thesis and their studies. This month’s guest is Dr Raymond Oppong who graduated with a PhD from the University of Birmingham. If you would like to suggest a candidate for an upcoming Thesis Thursday, get in touch.

Title
Economic analysis alongside multinational studies
Supervisors
Sue Jowett, Tracy Roberts
Repository link
http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/7288/

What attracted you to studying economic evaluation in the context of multinational studies?

One of the first projects that I was involved in when I started work as a health economist was the Genomics to combat Resistance against Antibiotics in Community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) in Europe (GRACE) project. This was an EU-funded study aimed at integrating and coordinating the activities of physicians and scientists from institutions in 14 European countries to combat antibiotic resistance in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections.

My first task on this project was to undertake a multinational costing study to estimate the costs of treating acute cough/LRTI in Europe. I faced quite a number of challenges including the lack of unit cost data across countries. Conducting a full economic evaluation alongside the interventional studies in GRACE also brought up a number of issues with respect to methods of analysis of multinational trials which needed to be resolved. The desire to understand and resolve some of these issues led me to undertake the PhD to investigate the implications of conducting economic evaluations alongside multinational studies.

Your thesis includes some case studies from a large multinational project. What were the main findings of your empirical work?

I used three main case studies for my empirical work. The first was an observational study aimed at describing the current presentation, investigation, treatment and outcomes of community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections and analysing the determinants of antibiotic use in Europe. The other 2 were RCTs. The first was aimed at studying the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy (amoxicillin) in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections, whilst the second was aimed at assessing training interventions to improve antibiotic prescribing behaviour by general practitioners. The observational study was used to explore issues relating to costing and outcomes in multinational studies whilst the RCTs explored the various analytical approaches (pooled and split) to economic evaluation alongside multinational studies.

The results from the observational study revealed large variations in costs across Europe and showed that contacting researchers in individual countries was the most effective way of obtaining unit costs. Results from both RCTs showed that the choice of whether to pool or split data had an impact on the cost-effectiveness of the interventions.

What were the key analytical methods used in your analysis?

The overall aim of the thesis was to study the implications of conducting economic analysis alongside multinational studies. Specific objectives include: i) documenting challenges associated with economic evaluations alongside multinational studies, ii) exploring various approaches to obtaining and estimating unit costs, iii) exploring the impact of using different tariffs to value EQ-5D health state descriptions, iv) comparing methods that have been used to conduct economic evaluation alongside multinational studies and v) making recommendations to guide the design and conduct of future economic evaluations carried out alongside multinational studies.

A number of approaches were used to achieve each of the objectives. A systematic review of the literature identified challenges associated with economic evaluations alongside multinational studies. A four-stage approach to obtaining unit costs was assessed. The UK, European and country-specific EQ-5D value sets were compared to determine which is the most appropriate to use in the context of multinational studies. Four analytical approaches – fully pooled one country costing, fully pooled multicountry costing, fully split one country costing and fully split multicountry costing – were compared in terms of resource use, costs, health outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Finally, based on the findings of the study, a set of recommendations were developed.

You completed your PhD part-time while working as a researcher. Did you find this a help or a hindrance to your studies?

I must say that it was both a help and a hindrance. Working in a research environment was really helpful. There was a lot of support from supervisors and colleagues which kept me motivated. I might have not gotten this support if I was not working in a research/academic environment. However, even though some time during the week was allocated to the PhD, I had to completely put it on hold for long periods of time in order to deal with the pressures of work/research. Consequently, I always had to struggle to find my bearings when I got back to the PhD. I also spent most weekends working on the PhD especially when I was nearing submission.

On the whole, it should be noted that a part-time PhD requires a lot of time management skills. I personally had to go on time management courses which were really helpful.

What advice would you give to a health economist conducting an economic evaluation alongside a multinational study?

For a health economist conducting an economic evaluation alongside a multinational trial, it is important to plan ahead and understand the challenges that are associated with economic evaluations alongside multinational studies. A lot of the problems such as those related to the identification of unit costs can be avoided by ensuring adequate measures are put in place at the design stage of the study. An understanding of the various health systems of the countries involved in the study is important in order to make a judgement about the differences and similarities in resource use across countries. Decision makers are interested in results that can be applied to their jurisdiction; therefore it is important to adopt transparent methods e.g. state the countries that participated in the study, state the sources of unit costs and make it clear whether data from all countries (pooling) or from a subset (splitting) were used. To ensure that the results of the study are generalisable to a number of countries it may be advisable to present country-specific results and probably conduct the analysis from different perspectives.