Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 30th September 2019

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

A need for change! A coding framework for improving transparency in decision modeling. PharmacoEconomics [PubMed] Published 24th September 2019

We’ve featured a few papers in recent round-ups that (I assume) will be included in an upcoming themed issue of PharmacoEconomics on transparency in modelling. It’s shaping up to be a good one. The value of transparency in decision modelling has been recognised, but simply making the stuff visible is not enough – it needs to make sense. The purpose of this paper is to help make that achievable.

The authors highlight that the writing of analyses, including coding, involves personal style and preferences. To aid transparency, we need a systematic framework of conventions that make the inner workings of a model understandable to any (expert) user. The paper describes a framework developed by the Decision Analysis in R for Technologies in Health (DARTH) group. The DARTH framework builds on a set of core model components, generalisable to all cost-effectiveness analyses and model structures. There are five components – i) model inputs, ii) model implementation, iii) model calibration, iv) model validation, and v) analysis – and the paper describes the role of each. Importantly, the analysis component can be divided into several parts relating to, for example, sensitivity analyses and value of information analyses.

Based on this framework, the authors provide recommendations for organising and naming files and on the types of functions and data structures required. The recommendations build on conventions established in other fields and in the use of R generally. The authors recommend the implementation of functions in R, and relate general recommendations to the context of decision modelling. We’re also introduced to unit testing, which will be unfamiliar to most Excel modellers but which can be relatively easily implemented in R. The role of various tools are introduced, including R Studio, R Markdown, Shiny, and GitHub.

The real value of this work lies in the linked R packages and other online material, which you can use to test out the framework and consider its application to whatever modelling problem you might have. The authors provide an example using a basic Sick-Sicker model, which you can have a play with using the DARTH packages. In combination with the online resources, this is a valuable paper that you should have to hand if you’re developing a model in R.

Accounts from developers of generic health state utility instruments explain why they produce different QALYs: a qualitative study. Social Science & Medicine [PubMed] Published 19th September 2019

It’s well known that different preference-based measures of health will generate different health state utility values for the same person. Yet, they continue to be used almost interchangeably. For this study, the authors spoke to people involved in the development of six popular measures: QWB, 15D, HUI, EQ-5D, SF-6D, and AQoL. Their goal was to understand the bases for the development of the measures and to explain why the different measures should give different results.

At least one original developer for each instrument was recruited, along with people involved at later stages of development. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 people, with questions on the background, aims, and criteria for the development of the measure, and on the descriptive system, preference weights, performance, and future development of the instrument.

Five broad topics were identified as being associated with differences in the measures: i) knowledge sources used for conceptualisation, ii) development purposes, iii) interpretations of what makes a ‘good’ instrument, iv) choice of valuation techniques, and v) the context for the development process. The online appendices provide some useful tables that summarise the differences between the measures. The authors distinguish between measures based on ‘objective’ definitions (QWB) and items that people found important (15D). Some prioritised sensitivity (AQoL, 15D), others prioritised validity (HUI, QWB), and several focused on pragmatism (SF-6D, HUI, 15D, EQ-5D). Some instruments had modest goals and opportunistic processes (EQ-5D, SF-6D, HUI), while others had grand goals and purposeful processes (QWB, 15D, AQoL). The use of some measures (EQ-5D, HUI) extended far beyond what the original developers had anticipated. In short, different measures were developed with quite different concepts and purposes in mind, so it’s no surprise that they give different results.

This paper provides some interesting accounts and views on the process of instrument development. It might prove most useful in understanding different measures’ blind spots, which can inform the selection of measures in research, as well as future development priorities.

The emerging social science literature on health technology assessment: a narrative review. Value in Health Published 16th September 2019

Health economics provides a good example of multidisciplinarity, with economists, statisticians, medics, epidemiologists, and plenty of others working together to inform health technology assessment. But I still don’t understand what sociologists are talking about half of the time. Yet, it seems that sociologists and political scientists are busy working on the big questions in HTA, as demonstrated by this paper’s 120 references. So, what are they up to?

This article reports on a narrative review, based on 41 empirical studies. Three broad research themes are identified: i) what drove the establishment and design of HTA bodies? ii) what has been the influence of HTA? and iii) what have been the social and political influences on HTA decisions? Some have argued that HTA is inevitable, while others have argued that there are alternative arrangements. Either way, no two systems are the same and it is not easy to explain differences. It’s important to understand HTA in the context of other social tendencies and trends, and that HTA influences and is influenced by these. The authors provide a substantial discussion on the role of stakeholders in HTA and the potential for some to attempt to game the system. Uncertainty abounds in HTA and this necessarily requires negotiation and acts as a limit on the extent to which HTA can rely on objectivity and rationality.

Something lacking is a critical history of HTA as a discipline and the question of what HTA is actually good for. There’s also not a lot of work out there on culture and values, which contrasts with medical sociology. The authors suggest that sociologists and political scientists could be more closely involved in HTA research projects. I suspect that such a move would be more challenging for the economists than for the sociologists.

Credits

Are QALYs #ableist?

As many of us who have had to review submitted journal articles, thesis defenses, grant applications, white papers, and even published literature know, providing feedback on something that is poorly conceived is much harder than providing feedback on something well done.

This is going to be hard.

Who is ValueOurHealth?

The video above comes from the website of “ValueOurHealth.org”; I would tell you more about them, but there is no “About Us” menu item on the website. However, the website indicates that they are a group of patient organizations concerned about:

“The use of flawed, discriminatory value assessments [that] could threaten access to care for patients with chronic illnesses and people with disabilities.”

In particular, who find issue with value assessments that

“place a value on the life of a human based on their health status and assume every patient will respond the same way to treatments.”

QALYs, according to these concerned patient groups, assign a value to human beings. People with lower values (like Jessica, in the video above), then, will be denied coverage because their life is “valued less than someone in perfect health” which means “less value is also placed on treating” them. (Many will be quick to notice that health states and QALYs are used interchangeably here. I try to explain why below.)

It’s not like this is a well-intended rogue group who simply misunderstands the concept of a QALY, requires someone to send them a polite email, and then we can all move on. Other groups have also asserted that QALYs unfairly discriminate against the aged and disabled, and include AimedAlliance, Alliance for Patient Access, Institute for Patient Access, Alliance for Aging Research, and Global Liver Institute. There are likely many more patient groups that abhor QALYs (and definite articles/determiners, it seems) out there, and are justifiably concerned about patient access to therapy. But these are all the ones I could find through a quick search and sitting from my perch in Canada.

Why do they hate QALYs?

One can infer pretty quickly that ValueOurHealth and their illustrative message is largely motivated by another very active organization, the “Partnership to Improve Patient Care” (PIPC). The video, and the arguments about “assigning QALYs” to people, seem to stem from a white paper produced by the PIPC, which in turn cites a very nicely written paper by Franco Sassi (of Imperial College London), that explains QALY and DALY calculations for researchers and policymakers.

The PIPC white paper, in fact, uses the very same calculation provided by Prof. Sassi to illustrate the impact of preventing a case of tuberculosis. However, unlike Prof. Sassi’s illustrative example, the PIPC fails to quantify the QALYs gained by the intervention. Instead they simply focus on the QALYs an individual who has tuberculosis for 6 months will experience. (0.36, versus 0.50, for those keeping score). After some further discussion about problems with measuring health states, the PIPC white paper then skips ahead to ethical problems with QALYs central to their position, citing a Value in Health paper by Erik Nord and colleagues. One of the key problems with the QALY according to the PIPC and argued in the Nord paper goes as follows:

“Valuing health gains in terms of QALYs means that life-years gained in full health—through, for instance, prevention of fatal accidents in people in normal health—are counted as more valuable than life-years gained by those who are chronically ill or disabled—for instance, by averting fatal episodes in people with asthma, heart disease, or mental illness.”

It seems the PIPC assume the lower number of QALYs experienced by those who are sick equates with the value of lives to payers. Even more interestingly, Prof. Nord’s analysis says nothing about costs. While those who are older have fewer QALYs to potentially gain, they also incur fewer costs. This is why, contrary to the assertion of preventing accidents in healthy people, preventive measures may offer a similar value to treatments when both QALYS and costs are considered.

It is also why an ICER review showed that alemtuzumab is good value in individuals requiring second-line treatment for relapse-remitting multiple sclerosis (1.34 QALYs can be gained compared to the next best alternative and at a lower cost then comparators), while a policy of annual mammography screening of similarly aged (i.e., >40) healthy women is of poor economic value (0.036 QALYs can be gained compared to no screening at an additional cost of $5,500 for every woman). Mammography provides better value in older individuals. It is not unlike fracture prevention and a myriad of other interventions in healthy, asymptomatic people in this regard. Quite contrary to the assertion of these misinformed groups, many interventions represent increasingly better value in frail, disabled, and older patients. Relative risks create larger yields when baseline risks are high.

None of this is to say that QALYs (and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios) do not have problems. And the PIPC, at the very least, should be commended for trying to advance alternative metrics, something that very few critics have offered. Instead, the PIPC and like-minded organizations are likely trapped in a filter bubble. They know there are problems with QALYs, and they see expensive and rare disease treatments being valued harshly. So, ergo, blame the QALY. (Note to PIPC: it is because the drugs are expensive, relative to other life-saving things, not because of your concerns about the QALY.) They then see that others feel the same way, which means their concerns are likely justified. A critique of QALYs issued by the Pioneer Institute identifies many of these same arguments. One Twitterer, a disabled Massachusetts lawyer “alive because of Medicaid” has offered further instruction for the QALY-naive.

What to do about it?

As a friend recently told me, not everyone is concerned with the QALY. Some don’t like what they see as a rationing approach promoted by the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) assessments. Some hate the QALY. Some hate both. Last year, Joshua T. Cohen, Dan Ollendorf, and Peter Neumann published their own blog entry on the effervescing criticism of ICER, even allowing the PIPC head to have a say about QALYs. They then tried to set the record straight with these thoughts:

While we applaud the call for novel measures and to work with patient and disability advocates to understand attributes important to them, there are three problems with PIPC’s position.

First, simply coming up with that list of key attributes does not address how society should allocate finite resources, or how to price a drug given individual or group preferences.

Second, the diminished weight QALYs assign to life with disability does not represent discrimination. Instead, diminished weight represents recognition that treatments mitigating disability confer value by restoring quality of life to levels typical among most of the population.

Finally, all value measures that inform allocation of finite resources trade off benefits important to some patients against benefits potentially important to others. PIPC itself notes that life years not weighted for disability (e.g., the equal value life-year gained, or evLYG, introduced by ICER for sensitivity analysis purposes) do not award value for improved quality of life. Indeed, any measure that does not “discriminate” against patients with disability cannot award treatments credit for improving their quality of life. Failing to award that credit would adversely affect this population by ruling out spending on such improvements.

Certainly a lot more can be said here.

But for now, I am more curious what others have to say…

Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 12th August 2019

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Developing open-source models for the US health system: practical experiences and challenges to date with the Open-Source Value Project. PharmacoEconomics [PubMed] Published 7th August 2019

PharmacoEconomics will soon publish a themed issue on transparency in decision modelling (to which I’ve contributed), and this paper – I assume – is one that will feature. At least one output from the Open-Source Value Project has featured in these round-ups before. The purpose of this paper is to describe the experiences of the initiative in developing and releasing two open-source models, one in rheumatoid arthritis and one in lung cancer.

The authors outline the background to the project and its goal to develop credible models that are more tuned-in to stakeholders’ needs. By sharing the R and C++ source code, developing interactive web applications, and providing extensive documentation, the models are intended to be wholly transparent and flexible. The model development process also involves feedback from experts and the public, followed by revision and re-release. It’s a huge undertaking. The paper sets out the key challenges associated with this process, such as enabling stakeholders with different backgrounds to understand technical models and each other. The authors explain how they have addressed such difficulties along the way. The resource implications of this process are also challenging, because the time and expertise required are much greater than for run-of-the-mill decision models. The advantages of the tools used by the project, such as R and GitHub, are explained, and the paper provides some ammunition for the open-source movement. One of the best parts of the paper is the authors’ challenge to those who question open-source modelling on the basis of intellectual property concerns. For example, they state that, “Claiming intellectually property on the implementation of a relatively common modeling approach in Excel or other programming software, such as a partitioned survival model in oncology, seems a bit pointless.” Agreed.

The response to date from the community has been broadly positive, though there has been a lack of engagement from US decision-makers. Despite this, the initiative has managed to secure adequate funding. This paper is a valuable read for anyone involved in open-source modelling or in establishing a collaborative platform for the creation and dissemination of research tools.

Incorporating affordability concerns within cost-effectiveness analysis for health technology assessment. Value in Health Published 30th July 2019

The issue of affordability is proving to be a hard nut to crack for health economists. That’s probably because we’ve spent a very long time conducting incremental cost-effectiveness analyses that pay little or no attention to the budget constraint. This paper sets out to define a framework that finally brings affordability into the fold.

The author sets up an example with a decision-maker that seeks to maximise population health with a fixed budget – read, HTA agency – and the motivating example is new medicines for hepatitis C. The core of the proposal is an alternative decision rule. Rather than simply comparing the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) to a fixed threshold, it incorporates a threshold that is a function of the budget impact. At it’s most basic, a bigger budget impact (all else equal) means a greater opportunity cost and thus a lower threshold. The author suggests doing away with the ICER (which is almost impossible to work with) and instead using net health benefits. In this framework, whether or not net health benefit is greater than zero depends on the size of the budget impact at any given ICER. If we accept the core principle that budget impact should be incorporated into the decision rule, it raises two other issues – time and uncertainty – which are also addressed in the paper. The framework moves us beyond the current focus on net present value, which ignores the distribution of costs over time beyond simply discounting future expenditure. Instead, the opportunity cost ‘threshold’ depends on the budget impact in each time period. The description of the framework also addresses uncertainty in budget impact, which requires the estimation of opportunity costs in each iteration of a probabilistic analysis.

The paper is thorough in setting out the calculations needed to implement this framework. If you’re conducting an economic evaluation of a technology that could have a non-marginal (big) budget impact, you should tag this on to your analysis plan. Once researchers start producing these estimates, we’ll be able to understand how important these differences could be for resource allocation decision-making and determine whether the likes of NICE ought to incorporate it into their methods guide.

Did UberX reduce ambulance volume? Health Economics [PubMed] [RePEc] Published 24th June 2019

In London, you can probably – at most times of day – get an Uber quicker than you can get an ambulance. That isn’t necessarily a bad thing, as ambulances aren’t there to provide convenience. But it does raise an interesting question. Could the availability of super-fast, low-cost, low-effort taxi hailing reduce pressure on ambulance services? If so, we might anticipate the effect to be greatest where people have to actually pay for ambulances.

This study combines data on Uber market entry in the US, by state and city, with ambulance rates. Between Q1 2012 and Q4 2015, the proportion of the US population with access to Uber rose from 0% to almost 25%. The authors are also able to distinguish ‘lights and sirens’ ambulance rides from ‘no lights and sirens’ rides. A difference-in-differences model estimates the ambulance rate for a given city by quarter-year. The analysis suggests that there was a significant decline in ambulance rates in the years following Uber’s entry to the market, implying an average of 1.2 fewer ambulance trips per 1,000 population per quarter.

There are some questionable results in here, including the fact that a larger effect was found for the ‘lights and sirens’ ambulance rate, so it’s not entirely clear what’s going on. The authors describe a variety of robustness checks for our consideration. Unfortunately, the discussion of the results is lacking in detail and insight, so readers need to figure it out themselves. I’d be very interested to see a similar analysis in the UK. I suspect that I would be inclined to opt for an Uber over an ambulance in many cases. And I wouldn’t have the usual concern about Uber exploiting its drivers, as I dare say ambulance drivers aren’t treated much better.

Credits