Thesis Thursday: James Oswald

On the third Thursday of every month, we speak to a recent graduate about their thesis and their studies. This month’s guest is Dr James Oswald who has a PhD from the University of Sheffield. If you would like to suggest a candidate for an upcoming Thesis Thursday, get in touch.

Title
Essays on well-being and mental health: determinants and consequences
Supervisors
Sarah Brown, Jenny Roberts, Bert Van Landeghem
Repository link
http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/18915/

What measures of health did you use in your research and how did these complement broader measures of well-being?

I didn’t use any measures of physical health. I used a few measures of subjective well-being (SWB) and mental health which vary across the chapters. In Chapter 2 I used life satisfaction and the Rutter Malaise Inventory. Life satisfaction is a global retrospective judgement of one’s life and is a measure of evaluative well-being (see Dolan and Metcalfe, 2012). The Rutter Malaise Inventory, a measure of affective well-being, is an index that is composed of 9 items that measure the respondent’s symptoms of psychological distress or depression. The measure of the mental health problems of adolescents that is used in Chapter 3 is the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). The SDQ is made up of four 5-item subscales: emotional problems, peer relationship problems, conduct problems, and hyperactivity/ inattention problems. Chapter 3 utilises the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) as a measure of the mental health of parents. The GHQ is a screening instrument that was initially developed to diagnose psychiatric disorders. Chapter 4 utilises one measure of subjective well-being, which relates to the number of days of poor self-reported mental health (stress, depression, and problems with emotions) in the past 30 days.

Did your research result in any novel findings regarding the social determinants of mental well-being?

The findings of Chapter 2 suggested that bullying victimisation at age 11 has a large, adverse effect on SWB as an adult. Childhood bullying remains prevalent – recent estimates suggest that approximately 20-30% of children are bullied by other children. The evidence provided in Chapter 3 indicated that greater externalising problems of adolescents are positively associated with the likelihood that they engage in antisocial behaviour. Chapter 4 indicated two important findings. Firstly, Hurricane Katrina had a negative effect on the SWB of individuals living in the states that were directly affected by the disaster. Secondly, the analysis suggested that the Indian Ocean tsunami and the Haiti earthquake increased the SWB of Americans living closest to the affected areas.

How can natural disasters affect mental health?

My thesis presents evidence to suggest that their impact depends upon whether you live in the disaster area. I explored the role of geography by exploring the effects of three disasters – hurricane Katrina in 2005 (USA), Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004 (East Asia), and the Haiti earthquake in 2010. Firstly, Hurricane Katrina had a negative effect on the SWB of individuals living in the states that were directly affected by the disaster. As a result, the findings suggest that government intervention in the aftermath of disasters is needed to help mitigate the adverse effects of natural disasters on the SWB of people who live in the directly affected areas. For example, appropriate mental health services and counselling could be offered to people suffering unhappiness or distress. Secondly, the analysis suggested that the Indian Ocean tsunami and the Haiti earthquake increased the SWB of Americans living closest to the affected areas. This surprising finding may be explained by the interdependence of utility functions. Following the disasters, Americans were exposed to widespread coverage of the disasters via social and traditional media sources. Because of the media coverage, they may have thought about the catastrophic repercussions of the disasters for the victims. Consequently, Americans who lived closest to the affected areas may have compared themselves to the disaster victims, leading them to feel thankful that the disaster did not affect them, thus increasing their SWB.

The empirical results support the case that the utility functions of strangers may be interdependent, rather than independent, an assumption generally made in economics. Furthermore, the findings indicated no evidence that the effects of the disasters were more pronounced for individuals of the same ethnicity as the disaster victims. The results therefore suggest that geographical proximity to the affected areas, rather than sharing similar characteristics with the disaster victims, may determine the effects of natural disasters on SWB outside of the areas that were directly affected by the disasters. This issue is discussed in greater detail in Chapter 4 of my thesis.

How did you go about identifying some of the consequences of mental health problems?

My thesis uses a range of econometric methods to explore the determinants and consequences of mental health and subjective well-being. In Chapter 2 – for childhood bullying and adult subjective well-being – I used a range of methods including random effects ordered probit models, Hausman tests, and Heckman models. Chapter 3 investigates how the mental health of adolescents affects their participation in antisocial behaviour. The analysis uses random effects probit, multivariate probit, and conditional logit models. Chapter 4 investigates the effects of three natural disasters on subjective well-being in the USA. The chapter uses difference-in-differences methodology with a count data model called a zero-inflated negative binomial model.

Are there any policy recommendations that you would make in light of your research?

Chapter 2 suggests that being bullied as a child adversely affects subjective well-being as an adult. My analysis supports the case that preventing children bullying in schools may have a positive effect on the SWB of a large percentage of the adult population. Chapter 3 indicated that greater externalising problems of adolescents are positively associated with the likelihood that they engage in antisocial behaviour. Previous research has suggested that adolescents who commit antisocial behaviour have an increased probability of committing crime as adults. Consequently, the findings suggest that mental health interventions to target the externalising problems of adolescents may reduce future crime. The findings also suggest that the money spent on the “Troubled Families” programme may be spent more cost-effectively in reducing antisocial behaviour by expanding access to mental health interventions for adolescents, such as via the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme.

The findings of Chapter 4 suggest that government intervention in the aftermath of disasters is needed to help mitigate the adverse effects of natural disasters on the SWB of people who live in the directly affected areas. For example, appropriate mental health services and counselling could be offered to people suffering unhappiness or distress because of natural disasters.

Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 14th May 2018

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

A practical guide to conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis of health state utility values. PharmacoEconomics [PubMed] Published 10th May 2018

I love articles that outline the practical application of a particular method to solve a particular problem, especially when the article shares analysis code that can be copied and adapted. This paper does just that for the case of synthesising health state utility values. Decision modellers use utility values as parameters. Most of the time these are drawn from a single source which almost certainly introduces some kind of bias to the resulting cost-effectiveness estimates. So it’s better to combine all of the relevant available information. But that’s easier said than done, as numerous researchers (myself included) have discovered. This paper outlines the various approaches and some of the merits and limitations of each. There are some standard stages, for which advice is provided, relating to the identification, selection, and extraction of data. Those are by no means simple tasks, but the really tricky bit comes when you try and pool the utility values that you’ve found. The authors outline three strategies: i) fixed effect meta-analysis, ii) random effects meta-analysis, and iii) mixed effects meta-regression. Each is illustrated with a hypothetical example, with Stata and R commands provided. Broadly speaking, the authors favour mixed effects meta-regression because of its ability to identify the extent of similarity between sources and to help explain heterogeneity. The authors insist that comparability between sources is a precondition for pooling. But the thing about health state utility values is that they are – almost by definition – never comparable. Different population? Not comparable. Different treatment pathway? No chance. Different utility measure? Ha! They may or may not appear to be similar statistically, but that’s totally irrelevant. What matters is whether the decision-maker ‘believes’ the values. If they believe them then they should be included and pooled. If decision-makers have reason to believe one source more or less than another then this should be accounted for in the weighting. If they don’t believe them at all then they should be excluded. Comparability is framed as a statistical question, when in reality it is a conceptual one. For now, researchers will have to tackle that themselves. This paper doesn’t solve all of the problems around meta-analysis of health state utility values, but it does a good job of outlining methodological developments to date and provides recommendations in accordance with them.

Unemployment, unemployment duration, and health: selection or causation? The European Journal of Health Economics [PubMed] Published 3rd May 2018

One of the major socioeconomic correlates of poor health is unemployment. It appears not to be very good for you. But there’s an obvious challenge here – does unemployment cause ill-health, or are unhealthy people just more likely to be unemployed? Both, probably, but that answer doesn’t make for clear policy solutions. This paper – following a large body of literature – attempts to explain what’s going on. Its novelty comes in the way the author considers timing and distinguishes between mental and physical health. The basis for the analysis is that selection into unemployment by the unhealthy ought to imply time-constant effects of unemployment on health. On the other hand, the negative effect of unemployment on health ought to grow over time. Using seven waves of data from the German Socio-economic Panel, a sample of 17,000 people (chopped from 48,000) is analysed, of which around 3,000 experienced unemployment. The basis for measuring mental and physical health is summary scores from the SF-12. A fixed-effects model is constructed based on the dependence of health on the duration and timing of unemployment, rather than just the occurrence of unemployment per se. The author finds a cumulative effect of unemployment on physical ill-health over time, implying causation. This is particularly pronounced for people unemployed in later life, and there was essentially no impact on physical health for younger people. The longer people spent unemployed, the more their health deteriorated. This was accompanied by a strong long-term selection effect of less physically healthy people being more likely to become unemployed. In contrast, for mental health, the findings suggest a short-term selection effect of people who experience a decline in mental health being more likely to become unemployed. But then, following unemployment, mental health declines further, so the balance of selection and causation effects is less clear. In contrast to physical health, people’s mental health is more badly affected by unemployment at younger ages. By no means does this study prove the balance between selection and causality. It can’t account for people’s anticipation of unemployment or future ill-health. But it does provide inspiration for better-targeted policies to limit the impact of unemployment on health.

Different domains – different time preferences? Social Science & Medicine [PubMed] Published 30th April 2018

Economists are often criticised by non-economists. Usually, the criticisms are unfounded, but one of the ways in which I think some (micro)economists can have tunnel vision is in thinking that preferences elicited with respect to money exhibit the same characteristics as preferences about things other than money. My instinct tells me that – for most people – that isn’t true. This study looks at one of those characteristics of preferences – namely, time preferences. Unfortunately for me, it suggests that my instincts aren’t correct. The authors outline a quasi-hyperbolic discounting model, incorporating both short-term present bias and long-term impatience, to explain gym members’ time preferences in the health and monetary domains. A survey was conducted with members of a chain of fitness centres in Denmark, of which 1,687 responded. Half were allocated to money-related questions and half to health-related questions. Respondents were asked to match an amount of future gains with an amount of immediate gains to provide a point of indifference. Health problems were formulated as back pain, with an EQ-5D-3L level 2 for usual activities and a level 2 for pain or discomfort. The findings were that estimates for discount rates and present bias in the two domains are different, but not by very much. On average, discount rates are slightly higher in the health domain – a finding driven by female respondents and people with more education. Present bias is the same – on average – in each domain, though retired people are more present biased for health. The authors conclude by focussing on the similarity between health and monetary time preferences, suggesting that time preferences in the monetary domain can safely be applied in the health domain. But I’d still be wary of this. For starters, one would expect a group of gym members – who have all decided to join the gym – to be relatively homogenous in their time preferences. Findings are similar on average, and there are only small differences in subgroups, but when it comes to health care (even public health) we’re never dealing with average people. Targeted interventions are increasingly needed, which means that differential discount rates in the health domain – of the kind identified in this study – should be brought into focus.

Credits

 

Brent Gibbons’s journal round-up for 22nd January 2018

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Is retirement good for men’s health? Evidence using a change in the retirement age in Israel. Journal of Health Economics [PubMed] Published January 2018

This article is a tour de force from one chapter of a recently completed dissertation from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The article focuses on answering the question of what are the health implications of extending working years for older adults. As many countries are faced with critical decisions on how to adjust labor policies to solve rising pension costs (or in the case of the U.S., Social Security insolvency) in the face of aging populations, one obvious potential solution is to change the retirement age. Most OECD countries appear to have retirement ages in the mid-60’s with a number of countries on track to increase that threshold. Israel is one of these countries, having changed their retirement age for men from age 65 to age 67 in 2004. The author capitalizes on this exogenous change in retirement incentives, as workers will be incentivized to keep working to receive full pension benefits, to measure the causal effect of working in these later years, compared to retiring. As the relationship between employment and health is complicated by the endogenous nature of the decision to work, there is a growing literature that has attempted to deal with this endogeneity in different ways. Shai details the conflicting findings in this literature and describes various shortcomings of methods used. He helpfully categorizes studies into those that compare health between retirees and non-retirees (does not deal with selection problem), those that use variation in retirement age across countries (retirement ages could be correlated with individual health across countries), those that exploit variation in specific sector retirement ages (problem of generalizing to population), and those that use age-specific retirement eligibility (health may deteriorate at specific age regardless of eligibility for retirement). As this empirical question has amounted conflicting evidence, the author suggests that his methodology is an improvement on prior papers. He uses a difference-in-difference model that estimates the impact on various health outcomes, before and after the law change, comparing those aged 65-66 years after 2004 with both older and younger cohorts unaffected by the law. The assumption is that any differences in measured health between the age 65-66 group and the comparison group are a result of the extended work in later years. There are several different datasets used in the study and quite a number of analyses that attempt to assuage threats to a causal interpretation of results. Overall, results are that delaying the retirement age has a negative effect on individual health. The size of the effect found is in the ballpark of 1 standard deviation; outcome measures included a severe morbidity index, a poor health index, and the number of physician visits. In addition, these impacts were stronger for individuals with lower levels of education, which the author relates to more physically demanding jobs. Counterfactuals, for example number of dentist visits, which are not expected to be related to employment, are not found to be statistically different. Furthermore, there are non-trivial estimated effects on health care expenditures that are positive for the delayed retirement group. The author suggests that all of these findings are important pieces of evidence in retirement age policy decisions. The implication is that health, at least for men, and especially for those with lower education, may be negatively impacted by delaying retirement and that, furthermore, savings as a result of such policies may be tempered by increased health care expenditures.

Evaluating community-based health improvement programs. Health Affairs [PubMed] Published January 2018

For article 2, I see that the lead author is a doctoral student in health policy at Harvard, working with colleagues at Vanderbilt. Without intention, this round-up is highlighting two very impressive studies from extremely promising young investigators. This study takes on the challenge of evaluating community-based health improvement programs, which I will call CBHIPs. CBHIPs take a population-based approach to public health for their communities and often focus on issues of prevention and health promotion. Investment in CBHIPs has increased in recent years, emphasizing collaboration between the community and public and private sectors. At the heart of CBHIPs are the ideas of empowering communities to self-assess and make needed changes from within (in collaboration with outside partners) and that CBHIPs allow for more flexibility in creating programs that target a community’s unique needs. Evaluations of CBHIPs, however, suffer from limited resources and investment, and often use “easily-collectable data and pre-post designs without comparison or control communities.” Current overall evidence on the effectiveness of CBHIPs remains limited as a result. In this study, the authors attempt to evaluate a large set of CBHIPs across the United States using inverse propensity score weighting and a difference-in-difference analysis. Health outcomes on poor or fair health, smoking status, and obesity status were used at the county level from the BRFSS (Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System) SMART (Selected Metropolitan/Micropolitan Area Risk Trends) data. Information on counties implementing CBHIPs was compiled through a series of systematic web searches and through interviews with leaders in population health efforts in the public and private sector. With information on the exact years of implementation of CBHIPs in each county, a pre-post design was used that identified county treatment and control groups. With additional census data, untreated counties were weighted to achieve better balance on pre-implementation covariates. Importantly, treated counties were limited to those with CBHIPs that implemented programs related to smoking and obesity. Results showed little to no evidence that CBHIPs improved population health outcomes. For example, CBHIPs focusing on tobacco prevention were associated with a 0.2 percentage point reduction in the rate of smoking, which was not statistically significant. Several important limitations of the study were noted by the authors, such as limited information on the intensity of programs and resources available. It is recognized that it is difficult to improve population-level health outcomes and that perhaps the study period of 5-years post-implementation may not have been long enough. The researchers encourage future CBHIPs to utilize more rigorous evaluation methods, while acknowledging the uphill battle CBHIPs face to do this.

Through the looking glass: estimating effects of medical homes for people with severe mental illness. Health Services Research [PubMed] Published October 2017

The third article in this round-up comes from a publication from October of last year, however, it is from the latest issue of Health Services Research so I deem it fair play. The article uses the topic of medical homes for individuals with severe mental illness to critically examine the topic of heterogeneous treatment effects. While specifically looking to answer whether there are heterogeneous treatment effects of medical homes on different portions of the population with a severe mental illness, the authors make a strong case for the need to examine heterogeneous treatment effects as a more general practice in observational studies research, as well as to be more precise in interpretations of results and statements of generalizability when presenting estimated effects. Adults with a severe mental illness were identified as good candidates for medical homes because of complex health care needs (including high physical health care needs) and because barriers to care have been found to exist for these individuals. Medicaid medical homes establish primary care physicians and their teams as the managers of the individual’s overall health care treatment. The authors are particularly concerned with the reasons individuals choose to participate in medical homes, whether because of expected improvements in quality of care, regional availability of medical homes, or symptomatology. Very clever differences in estimation methods allow the authors to estimate treatment effects associated with these different enrollment reasons. As an example, an instrumental variables analysis, using measures of regional availability as instruments, estimated local average treatment effects that were much smaller than the fixed effects estimates or the generalized estimating equation model’s effects. This implies that differences in county-level medical home availability are a smaller portion of the overall measured effects from other models. Overall results were that medical homes were positively associated with access to primary care, access to specialty mental health care, medication adherence, and measures of routine health care (e.g. screenings); there was also a slightly negative association with emergency room use. Since unmeasured stable attributes (e.g. patient preferences) do not seem to affect outcomes, results should be generalizable to the larger patient population. Finally, medical homes do not appear to be a good strategy for cost-savings but do promise to increase access to appropriate levels of health care treatment.

Credits