Rachel Houten’s journal round-up for 11th November 2019

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

A comparison of national guidelines for network meta-analysis. Value in Health [PubMed] Published October 2019

The evolving treatment landscape results in a greater dependence on indirect treatment comparisons to generate estimates of clinical effectiveness, where the current practice has not been compared to the proposed new intervention in a head-to-head trial. This paper is a review of the guidelines of reimbursement bodies for conducting network meta-analyses. Reassuringly, the authors find that it is possible to meet the needs of multiple agencies with one analysis.

The authors assign three categories to the criteria; “assessment and analysis to test assumptions required for a network meta-analysis, presentation and reporting of results, and justification of modelling choices”, with heterogeneity of the included studies highlighted as one of the key elements to be sure to include if prioritisation of the criteria is necessary. I think this is a simple way of thinking about what needs to be presented but the ‘justification’ category, in my experience, is often given less weight than the other two.

This paper is a useful resource for companies submitting to multiple HTA agencies with the requirements of each national body displayed in tables that are easy to navigate. It meets a practical need but doesn’t really go far enough for me. They do signpost to the PRISMA criteria, but I think it would have been really good to think about the purpose of the submission guidelines; to encourage a logical and coherent summary of the approaches taken so the evidence can be evaluated by decision-makers.

Variation in responsiveness to warranted behaviour change among NHS clinicians: novel implementation of change detection methods in longitudinal prescribing data. BMJ [PubMed] Published 2nd October 2019

I really like this paper. Such a lot of work, from all sectors, is devoted to the production of relevant and timely evidence to inform practice, but if the guidance does not become embedded into the real world then its usefulness is limited.

The authors have managed to utilize a HUGE amount of data to identify the real reaction to two pieces of guidance recommending a change in practice in England. The authors used “trend indicator saturation”, which I’m not ashamed to admit I knew nothing about beforehand, but it is explained nicely. Their thoughtful use of the information available to them results in three indicators of response (in this case the deprescribing of two drugs) around when the change occurs, how quickly it occurs, and how much change occurs.

The authors discover variation in response to the recommendations but suggest an application of their methods could be used to generate feedback to clinicians and therefore drive further response. As some primary care practices took a while to embed the guidance change into their prescribing, the paper raises interesting questions as to where the barriers to the adoption of guidance have occurred.

What is next for patient preferences in health technology assessment? A systematic review of the challenges. Value in Health Published November 2019

It may be that patient preferences have a role to play in the uptake of guideline recommendations, as proposed by the authors of my final paper this week. This systematic review, of the literature around embedding patient preferences into HTA decision-making, groups the discussion in the academic literature into five broad areas; conceptual, normative, procedural, methodological, and practical. The authors state that their purpose was not to formulate their own views, merely to present the available literature, but they do a good job of indicating where to find more opinionated literature on this topic.

Methodological issues were the biggest group, with aspects such as the sample selection, internal and external validity of the preferences generated, and the generalisability of the preferences collected from a sample to the entire population. However, in general, the number of topics covered in the literature is vast and varied.

It’s a great summary of the challenges that are faced, and a ranking based on frequency of topic being mentioned in the literature drives the authors proposed next steps. They recommend further research into the incorporation of preferences within or beyond the QALY and the use of multiple-criteria decision analysis as a method of integrating patient preferences into decision-making. I support the need for “a scientifically and valid manner” to integrate patient preferences into HTA decision-making but wonder if we can first learn of what works well and hasn’t worked so well from the attempts of HTA agencies thus far.

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Rita Faria’s journal round-up for 21st October 2019

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Quantifying how diagnostic test accuracy depends on threshold in a meta-analysis. Statistics in Medicine [PubMed] Published 30th September 2019

A diagnostic test is often based on a continuous measure, e.g. cholesterol, which is dichotomised at a certain threshold to classify people as ‘test positive’, who should be treated, or ‘test negative’, who should not. In an economic evaluation, we may wish to compare the costs and benefits of using the test at different thresholds. For example, the cost-effectiveness of offering lipid lowering therapy for people with cholesterol over 7 mmol/L vs over 5 mmol/L. This is straightforward to do if we have access to a large dataset comparing the test to its gold standard to estimate its sensitivity and specificity at various thresholds. It is quite the challenge if we only have aggregate data from multiple publications.

In this brilliant paper, Hayley Jones and colleagues report on a new method to synthesise diagnostic accuracy data from multiple studies. It consists of a multinomial meta-analysis model that can estimate how accuracy depends on the diagnostic threshold. This method produces estimates that can be used to parameterise an economic model.

These new developments in evidence synthesis are very exciting and really important to improve the data going into economic models. My only concern is that the model is implemented in WinBUGS, which is not a software that many applied analysts use. Would it be possible to have a tutorial, or even better, include this method in the online tools available in the Complex Reviews Support Unit website?

Early economic evaluation of diagnostic technologies: experiences of the NIHR Diagnostic Evidence Co-operatives. Medical Decision Making [PubMed] Published 26th September 2019

Keeping with the diagnostic theme, this paper by Lucy Abel and colleagues reports on the experience of the Diagnostic Evidence Co-operatives in conducting early modelling of diagnostic tests. These were established in 2013 to help developers of diagnostic tests link-up with clinical and academic experts.

The paper discusses eight projects where economic modelling was conducted at an early stage of project development. It was fascinating to read about the collaboration between academics and test developers. One of the positive aspects was the buy-in of the developers, while a less positive one was the pressure to produce evidence quickly and that supported the product.

The paper is excellent in discussing the strengths and challenges of these projects. Of note, there were challenges in mapping out a clinical pathway, selecting the appropriate comparators, and establishing the consequences of testing. Furthermore, they found that the parameters around treatment effectiveness were the key driver of cost-effectiveness in many of the evaluations. This is not surprising given that the benefits of a test are usually in better informing the management decisions, rather than via its direct costs and benefits. It definitely resonates with my own experience in conducting economic evaluations of diagnostic tests (see, for example, here).

Following on from the challenges, the authors suggest areas for methodological research: mapping the clinical pathway, ensuring model transparency, and modelling sequential tests. They finish with advice for researchers doing early modelling of tests, although I’d say that it would be applicable to any economic evaluation. I completely agree that we need better methods for economic evaluation of diagnostic tests. This paper is a useful first step in setting up a research agenda.

A second chance to get causal inference right: a classification of data science tasks. Chance [arXiv] Published 14th March 2019

This impressive paper by Miguel Hernan, John Hsu and Brian Healy is an essential read for all researchers, analysts and scientists. Miguel and colleagues classify data science tasks into description, prediction and counterfactual prediction. Description is using data to quantitatively summarise some features of the world. Prediction is using the data to know some features of the world given our knowledge about other features. Counterfactual prediction is using the data to know what some features of the world would have been if something hadn’t happened; that is, causal inference.

I found the explanation of the difference between prediction and causal inference quite enlightening. It is not about the amount of data or the statistical/econometric techniques. The key difference is in the role of expert knowledge. Predicting requires expert knowledge to specify the research question, the inputs, the outputs and the data sources. Additionally, causal inference requires expert knowledge “also to describe the causal structure of the system under study”. This causal knowledge is reflected in the assumptions, the ideas for the data analysis, and for the interpretation of the results.

The section on implications for decision-making makes some important points. First, that the goal of data science is to help people make better decisions. Second, that predictive algorithms can tell us that decisions need to be made but not which decision is most beneficial – for that, we need causal inference. Third, many of us work on complex systems for which we don’t know everything (the human body is a great example). Because we don’t know everything, it is impossible to predict with certainty what would be the consequences of an intervention in a specific individual from routine health records. At most, we can estimate the average causal effect, but even for that we need assumptions. The relevance to the latest developments in data science is obvious, given all the hype around real world data, artificial intelligence and machine learning.

I absolutely loved reading this paper and wholeheartedly recommend it for any health economist. It’s a must read!

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Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 11th March 2019

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Identification, review, and use of health state utilities in cost-effectiveness models: an ISPOR Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force report. Value in Health [PubMed] Published 1st March 2019

When modellers select health state utility values to plug into their models, they often do it in an ad hoc and unsystematic way. This ISPOR Task Force report seeks to address that.

The authors discuss the process of searching, reviewing, and synthesising utility values. Searches need to use iterative techniques because evidence requirements develop as a model develops. Due to the scope of models, it may be necessary to develop multiple search strategies (for example, for different aspects of disease pathways). Searches needn’t be exhaustive, but they should be systematic and transparent. The authors provide a list of factors that should be considered in defining search criteria. In reviewing utility values, both quality and appropriateness should be considered. Quality is indicated by the precision of the evidence, the response rate, and missing data. Appropriateness relates to the extent to which the evidence being reviewed conforms to the context of the model in which it is to be used. This includes factors such as the characteristics of the study population, the measure used, value sets used, and the timing of data collection. When it comes to synthesis, the authors suggest it might not be meaningful in most cases, because of variation in methods. We can’t pool values if they aren’t (at least roughly) equivalent. Therefore, one approach is to employ strict inclusion criteria (e.g only EQ-5D, only a particular value set), but this isn’t likely to leave you with much. Meta-regression can be used to analyse more dissimilar utility values and provide insight into the impact of methodological differences. But the extent to which this can provide pooled values for a model is questionable, and the authors concede that more research is needed.

This paper can inform that future research. Not least in its attempt to specify minimum reporting standards. We have another checklist, with another acronym (SpRUCE). The idea isn’t so much that this will guide publications of systematic reviews of utility values, but rather that modellers (and model reviewers) can use it to assess whether the selection of utility values was adequate. The authors then go on to offer methodological recommendations for using utility values in cost-effectiveness models, considering issues such as modelling technique, comorbidities, adverse events, and sensitivity analysis. It’s early days, so the recommendations in this report ought to be changed as methods develop. Still, it’s a first step away from the ad hoc selection of utility values that (no doubt) drives the results of many cost-effectiveness models.

Estimating the marginal cost of a life year in Sweden’s public healthcare sector. The European Journal of Health Economics [PubMed] Published 22nd February 2019

It’s only recently that health economists have gained access to data that enables the estimation of the opportunity cost of health care expenditure on a national level; what is sometimes referred to as a supply-side threshold. We’ve seen studies in the UK, Spain, Australia, and here we have one from Sweden.

The authors use data on health care expenditure at the national (1970-2016) and regional (2003-2016) level, alongside estimates of remaining life expectancy by age and gender (1970-2016). First, they try a time series analysis, testing the nature of causality. Finding an apparently causal relationship between longevity and expenditure, the authors don’t take it any further. Instead, the results are based on a panel data analysis, employing similar methods to estimates generated in other countries. The authors propose a conceptual model to support their analysis, which distinguishes it from other studies. In particular, the authors assert that the majority of the impact of expenditure on mortality operates through morbidity, which changes how the model should be specified. The number of newly graduated nurses is used as an instrument indicative of a supply-shift at the national rather than regional level. The models control for socioeconomic and demographic factors and morbidity not amenable to health care.

The authors estimate the marginal cost of a life year by dividing health care expenditure by the expenditure elasticity of life expectancy, finding an opportunity cost of €38,812 (with a massive 95% confidence interval). Using Swedish population norms for utility values, this would translate into around €45,000/QALY.

The analysis is considered and makes plain the difficulty of estimating the marginal productivity of health care expenditure. It looks like a nail in the coffin for the idea of estimating opportunity costs using time series. For now, at least, estimates of opportunity cost will be based on variation according to geography, rather than time. In their excellent discussion, the authors are candid about the limitations of their model. Their instrument wasn’t perfect and it looks like there may have been important confounding variables that they couldn’t control for.

Frequentist and Bayesian meta‐regression of health state utilities for multiple myeloma incorporating systematic review and analysis of individual patient data. Health Economics [PubMed] Published 20th February 2019

The first paper in this round-up was about improving practice in the systematic review of health state utility values, and it indicated the need for more research on the synthesis of values. Here, we have some. In this study, the authors conduct a meta-analysis of utility values alongside an analysis of registry and clinical study data for multiple myeloma patients.

A literature search identified 13 ‘methodologically appropriate’ papers, providing 27 health state utility values. The EMMOS registry included data for 2,445 patients in 22 counties and the APEX clinical study included 669 patients, all with EQ-5D-3L data. The authors implement both a frequentist meta-regression and a Bayesian model. In both cases, the models were run including all values and then with a limited set of only EQ-5D values. These models predicted utility values based on the number of treatment classes received and the rate of stem cell transplant in the sample. The priors used in the Bayesian model were based on studies that reported general utility values for the presence of disease (rather than according to treatment).

The frequentist models showed that utility was low at diagnosis, higher at first treatment, and lower at each subsequent treatment. Stem cell transplant had a positive impact on utility values independent of the number of previous treatments. The results of the Bayesian analysis were very similar, which the authors suggest is due to weak priors. An additional Bayesian model was run with preferred data but vague priors, to assess the sensitivity of the model to the priors. At later stages of disease (for which data were more sparse), there was greater uncertainty. The authors provide predicted values from each of the five models, according to the number of treatment classes received. The models provide slightly different results, except in the case of newly diagnosed patients (where the difference was 0.001). For example, the ‘EQ-5D only’ frequentist model gave a value of 0.659 for one treatment, while the Bayesian model gave a value of 0.620.

I’m not sure that the study satisfies the recommendations outlined in the ISPOR Task Force report described above (though that would be an unfair challenge, given the timing of publication). We’re told very little about the nature of the studies that are included, so it’s difficult to judge whether they should have been combined in this way. However, the authors state that they have made their data extraction and source code available online, which means I could check that out (though, having had a look, I can’t find the material that the authors refer to, reinforcing my hatred for the shambolic ‘supplementary material’ ecosystem). The main purpose of this paper is to progress the methods used to synthesise health state utility values, and it does that well. Predictably, the future is Bayesian.

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