Thesis Thursday: Matthew Quaife

On the third Thursday of every month, we speak to a recent graduate about their thesis and their studies. This month’s guest is Dr Matthew Quaife who has a PhD from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. If you would like to suggest a candidate for an upcoming Thesis Thursday, get in touch.

Title
Using stated preferences to estimate the impact and cost-effectiveness of new HIV prevention products in South Africa
Supervisors
Fern Terris-Prestholt, Peter Vickerman
Repository link
http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/4646708

Stated preferences for what?

Our main study looked at preferences for new HIV prevention products in South Africa – estimating the uptake and cost-effectiveness of multi-purpose prevention products, which protect against HIV, pregnancy and STIs. You’ll notice that condoms do this, so why even bother? Condom use needs both partners to agree (for the duration of a given activity) and, whilst female partners tend to prefer condom-protected sex, there is lots of evidence that male partners – who also have greater bargaining power in many contexts – do not.

Oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), microbicide gels, and vaginal rings are new products which prevent HIV infection. More importantly, they are female-initiated and can generally be used without a male partner’s knowledge. But trials and demonstration projects among women at high risk of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa have shown low levels of uptake and adherence. We used a DCE to inform the development of attractive and usable profiles for these products, and also estimate how much additional demand – and therefore protection – would be gained from adding contraceptive or STI-protective attributes.

We also elicited the stated preferences of female sex workers for client risk, condom use, and payments for sex. Sex workers can earn more for risky unprotected sex, and we used a repeated DCE to predict risk compensation (i.e. how much condom use would change) if they were to use HIV prevention products.

What did you find most influenced people’s preferences in your research?

Unsurprisingly for products, HIV protection was most important to people, followed by STI and then pregnancy protection. But digging below these averages with a latent class analysis, we found some interesting variation within female respondents: over a third were not concerned with HIV protection at all, instead strongly caring about pregnancy and STI protection. Worryingly, these were more likely to be respondents from high-incidence adolescent and sex worker groups. The remainder of the sample overwhelmingly chose based on HIV protection.

In the second sex worker DCE, we found that using a new HIV prevention product made condoms become less important and price more important. We predict that the price premium for unprotected sex would reduce by two thirds, and the amount of condomless sex would double. This is an interesting labour market/economic finding, but – if true – also has real public health implications. Since economic changes mean sex workers move from multi-purpose condoms to single-purpose products which need high levels of adherence, we thought this would be interesting to model.

How did you use information about people’s preferences to inform estimates of cost-effectiveness?

In two ways. First, we used simple uptake predictions from DCEs to parameterise an HIV transmission model, allowing for condom substitution uptake to vary by condom users and non-users (it was double in the latter). We were also able to model the potential uptake of multipurpose products which don’t exist yet – e.g. a pill protecting from HIV and pregnancy. We predict that this combination, in particular, would double uptake among high-risk young women.

Second, we predicted risk compensation among sex workers who chose new products instead of condoms. We were also able to calculate the price elasticity of supply of unprotected sex, which we built into a dynamic transmission model as a determinant of behaviour.

Can discrete choice experiments accurately predict the kinds of behaviours that you were looking at?

To be honest, when I started the PhD I was really sceptical – and I still am to an extent. But two things make me think DCEs can be useful in predicting behaviours.

First is the data. We published a meta-analysis of how well DCEs predict real-world health choices at an individual level. We only found six studies with individual-level data, but these showed DCEs predict with an 88% sensitivity but just a 34% specificity. If a DCE says you’ll do something, you more than likely will – which is important for modelling heterogeneity in uptake. We desperately need more studies following up DCE participants making real-world choices.

Second is the lack of alternative inputs. Where products are new and potential users are inexperienced, modellers pick an uptake number/range and hope for the best. Where we don’t know efficacy, we may assume that uptake and efficacy are linearly related – but they may not be (e.g. if proportionately more people use a 95% effective product than a 45% effective one). Instead, we might assume uptake and efficacy are independent, but that might sound even less realistic. I think that DCEs can tell us something about these behaviours that are useful for the parameters and structures of models, even if they are not perfect predictors.

Your tread the waters of infectious disease modelling in your research – was the incorporation of economic factors a challenge?

It was pretty tricky, though not as challenging as building the simple dynamic transmission model as a first exposure to R. In general, behaviours are pretty crudely modelled in transmission models, largely due to assumptions like random mixing and other population-level dynamics. We made a simple mechanistic model of sex work based on the supply elasticities estimated in the DCE, and ran a few scenarios, each time estimating the impact of prevention products. We simulated the price of unprotected sex falling and quantity rising as above, but also overlaid a few behavioural rules (e.g. Camerer’s constant income hypothesis) to simulate behavioural responses to a fall in overall income. Finally, we thought about competition between product users and non-users, and how much the latter may be affected by the market behaviours of the former. Look out for the paper at Bristol HESG!

How would you like to see research build on your work to improve HIV prevention?

I did a public engagement event last year based on one statistic: if you are a 16-year old girl living in Durban, you have an 80% lifetime risk of acquiring HIV. I find it unbelievable that, in 2018, when millions have been spent on HIV prevention and we have a range of interventions that can prevent HIV, incidence among some groups is still so dramatically and persistently high.

I think research has a really important role in understanding how people want to protect themselves from HIV, STIs, and pregnancy. In addition to highlighting the populations where interventions will be most cost-effective, we show that variation in preferences drives impact. I hope we can keep banging the drum to make attractive and effective options available to those at high risk.

Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 20th November 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Effects of health and social care spending constraints on mortality in England: a time trend analysis. BMJ Open [PubMed] Published 15th November 2017

I’d hazard a guess that I’m not the only one here who gets angry about the politics of austerity. Having seen this study’s title, it’s clear that the research could provide fuel for that anger. It doesn’t disappoint. Recent years have seen very low year-on-year increases in public expenditure on health in England. Even worse, between 2010 and 2014, public expenditure on social care actually fell in real terms. This is despite growing need for health and social care. In this study, the authors look at health and social care spending and try to estimate the impact that reduced expenditure has had on mortality in England. The analysis uses spending and mortality data from 2001 onwards and also incorporates mortality projections for 2015-2020. Time trend analyses are conducted using Poisson regression models. From 2001-2010, deaths decreased by 0.77% per year (on average). The mortality rate was falling. Now it seems to be increasing; from 2011-2014, the average number of deaths per year increased by 0.87%. This corresponds to 18,324 additional deaths in 2014, for example. But everybody dies. Extra deaths are really sooner deaths. So the question, really, is how much sooner? The authors look at potential years of life lost and find this figure to be 75,496 life-years greater than expected in 2014, given pre-2010 trends. This shouldn’t come as much of a surprise. Spending less generally achieves less. What makes this study really interesting is that it can tell us who is losing these potential years of life as a result of spending cuts. The authors find that it’s the over-60s. Care home deaths were the largest contributor to increased mortality. A £10 cut in social care spending per capita resulted in 5 additional care home deaths per 100,000 people. When the authors looked at deaths by local area, no association was found with the level of deprivation. If health and social care expenditure are combined in a single model, we see that it’s social care spending that is driving the number of excess deaths. The impact of health spending on hospital deaths was less robust. The number of nurses acted as a mediator for the relationship between spending and mortality. The authors estimate that current spending projections will result in 150,000 additional deaths compared with pre-2010 trends. There are plenty of limitations to this study. It’s pretty much impossible (though the authors do try) to separate the effects of austerity from the effect of a weak economy. Still, I’m satisfied with the conclusion that austerity kills older people (no jokes about turkeys and Christmas, please). For me, the findings also highlight the need for more research in the context of social care, and how we (as researchers) might effectively direct policy to prevent ‘excess’ deaths.

Should cost effectiveness analyses for NICE always consider future unrelated medical costs? BMJ [PubMed] Published 10th November 2017

The question of whether or not ‘unrelated’ future medical costs should be included in economic evaluation is becoming a hot topic. So much so that the BMJ has published this Head To Head, which introduces some of the arguments for and against. NICE currently recommends excluding unrelated future medical costs. An example given in this article is the case of the expected costs of dementia care having saved someone’s life by heart transplantation. The argument in favour of including unrelated costs is quite obvious – these costs can’t be ignored if we seek to maximise social welfare. Their inclusion is described as “not difficult” by the authors defending this move. By ignoring unrelated future costs (but accounting for the benefit of longer life), the relative cost-effectiveness of life-extending treatments, compared with life-improving treatments, is artificially inflated. The argument against including unrelated medical costs is presented as one of fairness. The author suggests that their inclusion could preclude access to health care for certain groups of people that are likely to have high needs in the future. So perhaps NICE should ignore unrelated medical costs in certain circumstances. I sympathise with this view, but I feel it is less a fairness issue and more a demonstration of the current limits of health-related quality of life measurement, which don’t reflect adaptation and coping. However, I tend to disagree with both of the arguments presented here. I really don’t think NICE should include or exclude unrelated future medical costs according to the context because that could create some very perverse incentives for certain stakeholders. But then, I do not agree that it is “not difficult” to include all unrelated future costs. ‘All’ is an important qualifier here because the capacity for analysts to pick and choose unrelated future costs creates the potential to pick and choose results. When it comes to unrelated future medical costs, NICE’s position needs to be all-or-nothing, and right now the ‘all’ bit is a high bar to clear. NICE should include unrelated future medical costs – it’s difficult to formulate a sound argument against that – but they should only do so once more groundwork has been done. In particular, we need to develop more valid methods for valuing quality of life against life-years in health technology assessment across different patient groups. And we need more reliable methods for estimating future medical costs in all settings.

Oncology modeling for fun and profit! Key steps for busy analysts in health technology assessment. PharmacoEconomics [PubMed] Published 6th November 2017

Quite a title(!). The subject of this essay is ‘partitioned survival modelling’. Honestly,  I never really knew what that was until I read this article. It seems the reason for my ignorance could be that I haven’t worked on the evaluation of cancer treatments, for which it’s a popular methodology. Apparently, a recent study found that almost 75% of NICE cancer drug appraisals were informed by this sort of analysis. Partitioned survival modelling is a simple means by which to extrapolate outcomes in a context where people can survive (or not) with or without progression. Often this can be on the basis of survival analyses and standard trial endpoints. This article seeks to provide some guidance on the development and use of partitioned survival models. Or, rather, it provides a toolkit for calling out those who might seek to use the method as a means of providing favourable results for a new therapy when data and analytical resources are lacking. The ‘key steps’ can be summarised as 1) avoiding/ignoring/misrepresenting current standards of economic evaluation, 2) using handpicked parametric approaches for extrapolation in order to maximise survival benefits, 3) creatively estimating relative treatment effects using indirect comparisons without adjustment, 4) make optimistic assumptions about post-progression outcomes, and 5) deny the possibility of any structural uncertainty. The authors illustrate just how much an analyst can influence the results of an evaluation (if they want to “keep ICERs in the sweet spot!”). Generally, these tactics move the model far from being representative of reality. However, the prevailing secrecy around most models means that it isn’t always easy to detect these shortcomings. Sometimes it is though, and the authors make explicit reference to technology appraisals that they suggest demonstrate these crimes. Brilliant!

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Review: Health Econometrics Using Stata (Partha Deb et al)

Health Econometrics Using Stata

Partha Deb, Edward C. Norton, Willard G. Manning

Paperback, 264 pages, ISBN: 978-1-59718-228-7, published 31 August 2017

Amazon / Google Books / Stata Press

This book is the perfect guide to understanding the various econometric methods available for modelling of costs and counts data for the individual who understands econometrics best after applying it to a dataset (like myself). Pre-requisites include a decent knowledge of Stata and a desire to apply econometric methods to a cost or count outcome variable

It’s important to say that this book does not cover all aspects of econometrics within health economics, but instead focuses on ‘modelling health care costs and counts’ (the title of the short course from which the book evolved). As expected from this range of texts, the vast majority of the book comes with detailed example Stata code for all of the methods described, with illustrations either using a publicly available sample of MEPS data or simulated data.

Like many papers in this field, the focus of the book revolves around the non-normal characteristics of health care resource use distributions. These are the mass point at zero, right-hand skew and inherent heteroskedasticity. As such the book covers the broad suite of models that have been developed in order to account for these features, ranging from two-part models, transformation of the data (and the problematic re-transformation of estimated effects) to non-linear modelling methods such as generalised linear models (GLMs). Unlike many papers in this field, the authors emphasise the need – and provide guidance on how – to delve deep into the underlying data in order to appreciate the most appropriate methods (there is even a chapter on design effects) and encourage rigorous testing of model specification. In addition, Health Econometrics Using Stata considers the important issue of endogeneity and is not solely fixated on distributional issues, providing important insight and code for estimation of non-linear models that control for potential endogeneity (interested readers may wish to heed the published cautionary notes for some of these methods, e.g. Chapman and Brooks). Finally, the book describes more advanced methods for estimating heterogeneous effects, although code is not provided for all of these methods, which is a bit of a shame (but perhaps understandable given the complexity).

This could be a very dry text, but it is not – emphatically! The personality of the authors comes through very strongly from the writing. Reading it brought back many pleasant memories from the course ‘modelling health care costs and counts’ that I sat in 2012. The book also features a dedication to Willard Manning, which is a fitting tribute to a man who was both a great academic and an outstanding mentor. One particular highlight, with which past course attendants will be familiar, is the section ‘top 10 myths in health econometrics’. This straightforward and punchy presentation, backed up by rigorous methodological research, is a great way to get these key messages across in an accessible format. Other great features of this book include the use of simulations to illustrate important features of the econometric models (with code provided to recreate) and a personal highlight (granted, a niche interest…) was the code to generate appropriate standard errors when using the poisson family within GLMs for costs.

Of course, Health Econometrics Using Stata cannot be comprehensive and there are developments in this field that are not covered. Most notably, there is no discussion of how to model these data in a panel/longitudinal setting, which is crucially important for estimating parameters for decision models, for example. Potential issues around missing data and censoring are also not discussed. Also, this text does not cover advances in flexible parametric modelling, which enable modelling of data that are both highly skewed and leptokurtic (see Jones 2017 for an excellent summary of this literature along with a primer on data visualisation using Stata).

I heartily recommend Health Econometrics Using Stata to interested colleagues who want practical advice – on model selection and specification testing with cost and count outcome data – from some of the top specialists in our field, in their own words.

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