Thesis Thursday: Lidia Engel

On the third Thursday of every month, we speak to a recent graduate about their thesis and their studies. This month’s guest is Dr Lidia Engel who graduated with a PhD from Simon Fraser University. If you would like to suggest a candidate for an upcoming Thesis Thursday, get in touch.

Title
Going beyond health-related quality of life for outcome measurement in economic evaluation
Supervisors
David Whitehurst, Scott Lear, Stirling Bryan
Repository link
https://theses.lib.sfu.ca/thesis/etd10264

Your thesis explores the potential for expanding the ‘evaluative space’ in economic evaluation. Why is this important?

I think there are two answers to this question. Firstly, methods for economic evaluation of health care interventions have existed for a number of years but these evaluations have mainly been applied to more narrowly defined ‘clinical’ interventions, such as drugs. Interventions nowadays are more complex, where benefits cannot be simply measured in terms of health. You can think of areas such as public health, mental health, social care, and end-of-life care, where interventions may result in broader benefits, such as increased control over daily life, independence, or aspects related to the process of health care delivery. Therefore, I believe there is a need to re-think the way we measure and value outcomes when we conduct an economic evaluation. Secondly, ignoring broader outcomes of health care interventions that go beyond the narrow focus of health-related quality of life can potentially lead to misallocation of scarce health care resources. Evidence has shown that the choice of outcome measure (such as a health outcome or a broader measure of wellbeing) can have a significant influence on the conclusions drawn from an economic evaluation.

You use both qualitative and quantitative approaches. Was this key to answering your research questions?

I mainly applied quantitative methods in my thesis research. However, Chapter 3 draws upon some qualitative methodology. To gain a better understanding of ‘benefits beyond health’, I came across a novel approach, called Critical Interpretive Synthesis. It is similar to meta-ethnography (i.e. a synthesis of qualitative research), with the difference that the synthesis is not of qualitative literature but of methodologically diverse literature. It involves an iterative approach, where searching, sampling, and synthesis go hand in hand. It doesn’t only produce a summary of existing literature but enables the development of new interpretations that go beyond those originally offered in the literature. I really liked this approach because it enabled me to synthesise the evidence in a more effective way compared with a conventional systematic review. Defining and applying codes and themes, as it is traditionally done in qualitative research, allowed me to organize the general idea of non-health benefits into a coherent thematic framework, which in the end provided me with a better understanding of the topic overall.

What data did you analyse and what quantitative methods did you use?

I conducted three empirical analyses in my thesis research, which all made use of data from the ICECAP measures (ICECAP-O and ICECAP-A). In my first paper, I used data from the ‘Walk the Talk (WTT)‘ project to investigate the complementarity of the ICECAP-O and the EQ-5D-5L in a public health context using regression analyses. My second paper used exploratory factor analysis to investigate the extent of overlap between the ICECAP-A and five preference-based health-related quality of life measures, using data from the Multi Instrument Comparison (MIC) project. I am currently finalizing submission of my third empirical analysis, which reports findings from a path analysis using cross-sectional data from a web-based survey. The path analysis explores three outcome measurement approaches (health-related quality of life, subjective wellbeing, and capability wellbeing) through direct and mediated pathways in individuals living with spinal cord injury. Each of the three studies addressed different components of the overall research question, which, collectively, demonstrated the added value of broader outcome measures in economic evaluation when compared with existing preference-based health-related quality of life measures.

Thinking about the different measures that you considered in your analyses, were any of your findings surprising or unexpected?

In my first paper, I found that the ICECAP-O is more sensitive to environmental features (i.e. social cohesion and street connectivity) when compared with the EQ-5D-5L. As my second paper has shown, this was not surprising, as the ICECAP-A (a measure for adults rather than older adults) and the EQ-5D-5L measure different constructs and had only limited overlap in their descriptive classification systems. While a similar observation was made when comparing the ICECAP-A with three other preference-based health-related quality of life measures (15D, HUI-3, and SF-6D), a substantial overlap was observed between the ICECAP-A and the AQoL-8D, which suggests that it is possible for broader benefits to be captured by preference-based health-related measures (although some may not consider the AQoL-8D to be exclusively ‘health-related’, despite the label). The findings from the path analysis confirmed the similarities between the ICECAP-A and the AQoL-8D. However, the findings do not imply that the AQoL-8D and ICECAP-A are interchangeable instruments, as a mediation effect was found that requires further research.

How would you like to see your research inform current practice in economic evaluation? Is the QALY still in good health?

I am aware of the limitations of the QALY and although there are increasing concerns that the QALY framework does not capture all benefits of health care interventions, it is important to understand that the evaluative space of the QALY is determined by the dimensions included in preference-based measures. From a theoretical point of view, the QALY can embrace any characteristics that are important for the allocation of health care resources. However, in practice, it seems that QALYs are currently defined by what is measured (e.g. the dimensions and response options of EQ-5D instruments) rather than the conceptual origin. Therefore, although non-health benefits have been largely ignored when estimating QALYs, one should not dismiss the QALY framework but rather develop appropriate instruments that capture such broader benefits. I believe the findings of my thesis have particular relevance for national HTA bodies that set guidelines for the conduct of economic evaluation. While the need to maintain methodological consistency is important, the assessment of the real benefits of some health care interventions would be more accurate if we were less prescriptive in terms of which outcome measure to use when conducting an economic evaluation. As my thesis has shown, some preference-based measures already adopt a broad evaluative space but are less frequently used.

Alastair Canaway’s journal round-up for 20th March 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

The use of quality-adjusted life years in cost-effectiveness analyses in palliative care: mapping the debate through an integrative review. Palliative Medicine [PubMed] Published 13th February 2017

February saw a health economics special within the journal Palliative Medicine – the editorials are very much worth a read to get a quick idea of how health economics has (and hasn’t) developed within the end of life care context. One of the most commonly encountered debates when discussing end of life care within health economics circles relates to the use of QALYs, and whether they’re appropriate. This paper aimed to map out the pros and cons of using the QALY framework to inform health economic decisions in the palliative care context. Being a review, there were no ground-breaking findings, more a refresher on what the issues are with the QALY at end of life: i) restrictions in life years gained, ii) conceptualisation of quality of life and its measurement, and iii) valuation and additivity of time. The review acknowledges the criticisms of the QALY but concludes that it is still of use for informing decision making. A key finding, and one which should be common sense, is that the EQ-5D should not be relied on as the sole measure within this context: the dimensions important to those at end of life are not adequately captured by the EQ-5D, and other measures should be considered. A limitation for me was that the review did not include Round’s (2016) book Care at the End of Life: An Economic Perspective (disclaimer: I’m a co-author on a chapter), which has significant overlap and builds on a number of the issues relevant to the paper. That aside, this is a useful paper for those new to the pitfalls of economic evaluation at the end of life and provides an excellent summary of many of the key issues.

The causal effect of retirement on mortality: evidence from targeted incentives to retire early. Health Economics [PubMed] [RePEc] Published 23rd February 2017

It’s been said that those who retire earlier die earlier, and a quick google search suggests there are many statistics supporting this. However, I’m unsure how robust the causality is in such studies. For example, the sick may choose to leave the workforce early. Previous academic literature had been inconclusive regarding the effects, and in which direction they occurred. This paper sought to elucidate this by taking advantage of pension reforms within the Netherlands which meant certain cohorts of Dutch civil servants could qualify for early retirement at a younger age. This change led to a steep increase in retirement and provided an opportunity to examine causal impacts by instrumenting retirement with the early retirement window. Administrative data from the entire population was used to examine the probability of dying resulting from earlier retirement. Contrary to preconceptions, the probability of men dying within five years dropped by 2.6% in those who took early retirement: a large and significant impact. The biggest impact was found within the first year of retirement. An explanation for this is that the reduction of stress and lifestyle change upon retiring may postpone death for the civil servants which were in poor health. The paper is an excellent example of harnessing a natural experiment for research purposes. It provides a valuable contribution to the evidence base whilst also being reassuring for those of us who plan to retire in the next few years (lottery win pending).

Mapping to estimate health-state utility from non–preference-based outcome measures: an ISPOR Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force report. Value in Health [PubMed] Published 16th February 2017

Finally, I just wanted to signpost this new good practice guide. If you ever attend HESG, ISPOR, or IHEA, you’ll nearly always encounter a paper on mapping (cross-walking). Given the ethical issues surrounding research waste and the increasing pressure to publish, mapping provides an excellent opportunity to maximise the value of your data. Of course, mapping also serves a purpose for the health economics community: it facilitates the estimation of QALYs in studies where no preference based measure exists. There are many iffy mapping functions out there so it’s good to see ISPOR have taken action by producing a report on best practice for mapping. As with most ISPOR guidelines the paper covers all the main areas you’d expect and guides you through the key considerations to undertaking a mapping exercise, this includes: pre-modelling considerations, data requirements, selection of statistical models, selection of covariates, reporting of results, and validation. Additionally there is also a short section for those who are keen to use a mapping function to generate QALYs but are unsure which to pick. As with any set of guidelines, it’s not exactly a thriller, it is however extremely useful for anyone seeking to conduct mapping.

Credits

#HEJC for 03/12/2012

This month’s meeting will take place Monday 3rd December, at 8pm London time. That’ll be midday in Los Angeles and 7am on Tuesday in Sydney. Join the Facebook event here. For more information about the Health Economics Twitter Journal Club and how to take part, click here.

The paper for discussion this month is published as an Online First article in Quality of Life Research and the authors are Hareth Al-Janabi and colleagues. The title of the paper is:

“An investigation of the construct validity of the ICECAP-A capability measure”

Following the meeting, a transcript of the discussion can be downloaded here.

Links to the article

Official: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11136-012-0293-5 [open access]

RePEc: tbc

Other: tbc

Summary of the paper

This study investigates the construct validity of the ICECAP-A capability measure, using face-to-face interviews with the UK general population. 418 participants were randomly selected from the Postcode Address File and were presented with the ICECAP-A measure and a series of contextual questions relating to socio-demographics, material well-being, major life events, happiness, religiosity, health, use of health care and perceptions of freedom. The authors developed hypotheses about the expected associations between individuals’ responses to the ICECAP-A measure and these contextual factors. Their hypotheses were investigated using statistical tests of association. ICECAP-A responses and scores reflected differences across different health and socio-economic groups, but did not distinguish individuals by the level of local deprivation. The authors found that mean ICECAP-A scores reflected individuals’ perceived freedom more closely than did measures of health and happiness. This study suggests that the ICECAP-A measure can identify expected differences in capability well-being in a general population sample.

Discussion points

  • Are the authors’ pre-determined hypotheses appropriate and sufficient?
  • Are the contextual factors defined such that they isolate capabilities from functioning?
  • Is the scope of capability appropriately defined?
  • To what extent could the ICECAP-A inform allocation decisions in health care?

Missed the meeting? Add your thoughts on the paper in the comments below.