Thesis Thursday: Mathilde Péron

On the third Thursday of every month, we speak to a recent graduate about their thesis and their studies. This month’s guest is Dr Mathilde Péron who graduated with a PhD from Université Paris Dauphine. If you would like to suggest a candidate for an upcoming Thesis Thursday, get in touch.

Title
Three essays on supplementary health insurance
Supervisors
Brigitte Dormont
Repository link
https://basepub.dauphine.fr/handle/123456789/16695

How important is supplementary health insurance in France, compared with other countries?

In France in 2016, Supplementary Health Insurance (SHI) financed 13.3% of total health care expenditure. SHI supplements a partial mandatory coverage by covering co-payments as well as medical goods and services outside the public benefit package, such as dental and optical care or balance billing. SHI is not a French singularity. Canada, Austria, Switzerland, the US (with Medicare / Medigap) or the UK do offer voluntary SHI contracts. A remarkable fact, however, is that 95% of the French population is covered by a SHI contract. In comparison, although the extent of public coverage is very similar in France and in the UK, the percentage of British patients enrolled in a private medical insurance is below 15%.

The large SHI enrolment and the subsequent limited out-of-pocket payments – €230 per year on average, the lowest among EU countries – should not hide important inequalities in the extent of coverage and premiums paid. SHI coverage is now mandatory for employees of the private sector. They benefit from subsidized contracts and uniform premiums. Individuals with an annual income below €8,700 benefit from free basic SHI coverage which covers copayments, essentially. However, the rest of the population (students, temporary workers, unemployed, retirees, independent, and civil servants) buy SHI in a competitive market where premiums generally increase with age.

Can supplementary health insurance markets lead to an adverse selection death spiral?

Competitive health insurance markets are subject to asymmetric information that prevent the existence of pooling contracts (Rothschild and Stiglitz, 1976Cutler and Zeckhauser, 1998). The US market is a good example; in the 1950s not-for-profit insurance companies (Blue Cross, Blue Shields) – which offered pooled contracts – almost all disappeared (Thomasson, 2002). And, despite a notably higher public coverage that could limit adverse selection effects, the French SHI market is not an exception.

Historically, SHI coverage was provided by not-for-profit insurers, the Mutuelles, who relied on solidarity principles. But as the competition becomes more intense, the Mutuelles experience the adverse selection death spiral; they lose their low-risk clients attracted by lower premiums. To survive, they have to give up on uniform premiums and standardized coverage. Today 90% of SHI contracts in the individual market have premiums that increase with age. It is worth noting that in France insurers have strong fiscal incentives to avoid medical underwriting, so age remains the only predictor for individual risk. Still, premiums can vary with a ratio of 1 to 3, which raises legitimate concerns about the affordability of insurance and access to health care for patients with increasing medical needs.

How does supplementary health insurance influence prices in health care, and how did you measure this in your research?

A real policy concern is that SHI might have an inflationary effect by allowing patients to consume more at higher prices. Access to specialists who balance bill (i.e. charge more than the regulated fee) – a signal for higher quality and reduced waiting times – is a good example (Dormont and Peron, 2016).

To measure the causal impact of SHI on balance billing consumption we use original individual-level data, collected from the administrative claims of a French insurer. We observe balance billing consumption and both mandatory and SHI reimbursements for 43,111 individuals from 2010 to 2012. In 2010, the whole sample was covered by the same SHI contract, which does not cover balance billing. We observe the sample again in 2012 after that 3,819 among them decided to switch to other supplementary insurers, which we assume covers balance billing. We deal with the endogeneity of the decision to switch by introducing individual effects into the specifications and by using instrumental variables for the estimation.

We find that individuals respond to better coverage by increasing their proportion of visits to a specialist who balance bills by 9%, resulting in a 32% increase in the amount of balance billing per visit. This substitution to more expensive care is likely to encourage the rise in medical prices.

Does the effect of supplementary insurance on health care consumption differ according to people’s characteristics?

An important result is that the magnitude of the impact of SHI on balance billing strongly depends on the availability of specialists. We find no evidence of moral hazard in areas where specialists who do not charge balance billing are readily accessible. On the contrary, in areas where they are scarce, better coverage is associated with a 47% increase in the average amount of balance billing per consultation. This result suggests that the most appropriate policy to contain medical prices is not necessarily to limit SHI coverage but to monitor the supply of care in order to guarantee patients a genuine choice of their physicians.

We further investigate the heterogeneous impact of SHI in a model where we specify individual heterogeneity in moral hazard and consider its possible correlation with coverage choices (Peron and Dormont, 2017 [PDF]). We find evidence of selection on moral hazard: individuals with unobserved characteristics that make them more likely to ask for comprehensive SHI show a larger increase in balance billing per visit. This selection effect is likely to worsen the inflationary impact of SHI. On the other hand, we also find that the impact of a better coverage is larger for low-income people, suggesting that SHI plays a role in access to care.

Have the findings from your PhD research influenced your own decision to buy supplementary health insurance?

As an economist, it’s interesting to reflect on your own decisions, isn’t it? Well, I master cost-benefit analysis, I have a good understanding of expected utility and definitely more information than the average consumer in the health insurance market. Still, my choice of SHI might appear quite irrational. I’m (reasonably) young and healthy, I could have easily switched to a contract with lower premiums and higher benefits, but I did not. I stayed with a contract where premiums mainly depend on income and benefits are standardized, an increasingly rare feature in the market. I guess that stresses out the importance of other factors in my decision to buy SHI, my inertia as a consumer, probably, but also my willingness to pay for solidarity.

Meeting round-up: Fourth EuHEA PhD Student-Supervisor and Early Career Researcher Conference

The 4th catchily-titled EuHEA PhD Student-Supervisor and Early Career Researcher (ECR) conference took place from 6th–8th September 2017 in Lausanne, Switzerland. Students and ECRs can attend alone but are encouraged to bring their supervisors or other senior colleagues with them, who are then allocated as discussants.

With a format inspired by the UK HESG meeting, papers are pre-circulated and each given an hour session. The student or ECR first presents their paper for 25 minutes, followed by a 15-minute discussion from an allocated senior delegate. The floor is then opened to the audience for a further 20 minutes of discussion. This format enables students and ECRs to gain experience in both writing and presenting their work, in addition to receiving detailed feedback and suggestions for future directions.

45 papers were presented in total, and the overall standard of the work was exceptional. Four parallel sessions ran, roughly grouped into the themes of: economic evaluation of medical technologies; economics of health system financing, regulation and delivery; determinants of health behaviours and consequences; and patient and provider decision making and incentives. So there really was something for everyone. There were also short 10-minute presentation sessions. I really enjoyed these quick overviews and felt that I learnt more about people’s research from these than a traditional poster session.

The atmosphere is purposefully relaxed and friendly, and it was great to see students and ECRs contributing to the discussions just as much as their senior supervisors. The conference also seems to attract repeat attendance and so is beginning to form a supportive network of junior health economists who now meet annually. As one of the organisers of the first conference in Manchester, a personal highlight for me was seeing delegates who had originally attended as PhD students returning this time in the role of supervisor as their careers have progressed.

Ieva Sriubaite had the rather daunting but invaluable opportunity to have her paper “Go your own way? The importance of peers in the formation of physician practice styles” discussed by Prof Amitabh Chandra from Harvard, who also gave the plenary speech. Whilst the conference programme was packed, there were still plenty of opportunities to socialise, and a cultured trip to The Hermitage Foundation.

An initiative to come out of the previous conference is the formation of a EuHEA Early Career Committee, which will represent the interests of health economists at the start of their careers within EuHEA. I had the great honour of being elected to chair this committee, and we held our first committee meeting during the conference. Watch out for updates on our best idea to come from this meeting – a conference cruise.

For now, hold 5th–7th September 2018 in your diaries and book your flights to Sicily for the 5th conference. If that location doesn’t convince you to attend I don’t know what will.

Credits

Thesis Thursday: Lidia Engel

On the third Thursday of every month, we speak to a recent graduate about their thesis and their studies. This month’s guest is Dr Lidia Engel who graduated with a PhD from Simon Fraser University. If you would like to suggest a candidate for an upcoming Thesis Thursday, get in touch.

Title
Going beyond health-related quality of life for outcome measurement in economic evaluation
Supervisors
David Whitehurst, Scott Lear, Stirling Bryan
Repository link
https://theses.lib.sfu.ca/thesis/etd10264

Your thesis explores the potential for expanding the ‘evaluative space’ in economic evaluation. Why is this important?

I think there are two answers to this question. Firstly, methods for economic evaluation of health care interventions have existed for a number of years but these evaluations have mainly been applied to more narrowly defined ‘clinical’ interventions, such as drugs. Interventions nowadays are more complex, where benefits cannot be simply measured in terms of health. You can think of areas such as public health, mental health, social care, and end-of-life care, where interventions may result in broader benefits, such as increased control over daily life, independence, or aspects related to the process of health care delivery. Therefore, I believe there is a need to re-think the way we measure and value outcomes when we conduct an economic evaluation. Secondly, ignoring broader outcomes of health care interventions that go beyond the narrow focus of health-related quality of life can potentially lead to misallocation of scarce health care resources. Evidence has shown that the choice of outcome measure (such as a health outcome or a broader measure of wellbeing) can have a significant influence on the conclusions drawn from an economic evaluation.

You use both qualitative and quantitative approaches. Was this key to answering your research questions?

I mainly applied quantitative methods in my thesis research. However, Chapter 3 draws upon some qualitative methodology. To gain a better understanding of ‘benefits beyond health’, I came across a novel approach, called Critical Interpretive Synthesis. It is similar to meta-ethnography (i.e. a synthesis of qualitative research), with the difference that the synthesis is not of qualitative literature but of methodologically diverse literature. It involves an iterative approach, where searching, sampling, and synthesis go hand in hand. It doesn’t only produce a summary of existing literature but enables the development of new interpretations that go beyond those originally offered in the literature. I really liked this approach because it enabled me to synthesise the evidence in a more effective way compared with a conventional systematic review. Defining and applying codes and themes, as it is traditionally done in qualitative research, allowed me to organize the general idea of non-health benefits into a coherent thematic framework, which in the end provided me with a better understanding of the topic overall.

What data did you analyse and what quantitative methods did you use?

I conducted three empirical analyses in my thesis research, which all made use of data from the ICECAP measures (ICECAP-O and ICECAP-A). In my first paper, I used data from the ‘Walk the Talk (WTT)‘ project to investigate the complementarity of the ICECAP-O and the EQ-5D-5L in a public health context using regression analyses. My second paper used exploratory factor analysis to investigate the extent of overlap between the ICECAP-A and five preference-based health-related quality of life measures, using data from the Multi Instrument Comparison (MIC) project. I am currently finalizing submission of my third empirical analysis, which reports findings from a path analysis using cross-sectional data from a web-based survey. The path analysis explores three outcome measurement approaches (health-related quality of life, subjective wellbeing, and capability wellbeing) through direct and mediated pathways in individuals living with spinal cord injury. Each of the three studies addressed different components of the overall research question, which, collectively, demonstrated the added value of broader outcome measures in economic evaluation when compared with existing preference-based health-related quality of life measures.

Thinking about the different measures that you considered in your analyses, were any of your findings surprising or unexpected?

In my first paper, I found that the ICECAP-O is more sensitive to environmental features (i.e. social cohesion and street connectivity) when compared with the EQ-5D-5L. As my second paper has shown, this was not surprising, as the ICECAP-A (a measure for adults rather than older adults) and the EQ-5D-5L measure different constructs and had only limited overlap in their descriptive classification systems. While a similar observation was made when comparing the ICECAP-A with three other preference-based health-related quality of life measures (15D, HUI-3, and SF-6D), a substantial overlap was observed between the ICECAP-A and the AQoL-8D, which suggests that it is possible for broader benefits to be captured by preference-based health-related measures (although some may not consider the AQoL-8D to be exclusively ‘health-related’, despite the label). The findings from the path analysis confirmed the similarities between the ICECAP-A and the AQoL-8D. However, the findings do not imply that the AQoL-8D and ICECAP-A are interchangeable instruments, as a mediation effect was found that requires further research.

How would you like to see your research inform current practice in economic evaluation? Is the QALY still in good health?

I am aware of the limitations of the QALY and although there are increasing concerns that the QALY framework does not capture all benefits of health care interventions, it is important to understand that the evaluative space of the QALY is determined by the dimensions included in preference-based measures. From a theoretical point of view, the QALY can embrace any characteristics that are important for the allocation of health care resources. However, in practice, it seems that QALYs are currently defined by what is measured (e.g. the dimensions and response options of EQ-5D instruments) rather than the conceptual origin. Therefore, although non-health benefits have been largely ignored when estimating QALYs, one should not dismiss the QALY framework but rather develop appropriate instruments that capture such broader benefits. I believe the findings of my thesis have particular relevance for national HTA bodies that set guidelines for the conduct of economic evaluation. While the need to maintain methodological consistency is important, the assessment of the real benefits of some health care interventions would be more accurate if we were less prescriptive in terms of which outcome measure to use when conducting an economic evaluation. As my thesis has shown, some preference-based measures already adopt a broad evaluative space but are less frequently used.