Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 14th May 2018

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

A practical guide to conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis of health state utility values. PharmacoEconomics [PubMed] Published 10th May 2018

I love articles that outline the practical application of a particular method to solve a particular problem, especially when the article shares analysis code that can be copied and adapted. This paper does just that for the case of synthesising health state utility values. Decision modellers use utility values as parameters. Most of the time these are drawn from a single source which almost certainly introduces some kind of bias to the resulting cost-effectiveness estimates. So it’s better to combine all of the relevant available information. But that’s easier said than done, as numerous researchers (myself included) have discovered. This paper outlines the various approaches and some of the merits and limitations of each. There are some standard stages, for which advice is provided, relating to the identification, selection, and extraction of data. Those are by no means simple tasks, but the really tricky bit comes when you try and pool the utility values that you’ve found. The authors outline three strategies: i) fixed effect meta-analysis, ii) random effects meta-analysis, and iii) mixed effects meta-regression. Each is illustrated with a hypothetical example, with Stata and R commands provided. Broadly speaking, the authors favour mixed effects meta-regression because of its ability to identify the extent of similarity between sources and to help explain heterogeneity. The authors insist that comparability between sources is a precondition for pooling. But the thing about health state utility values is that they are – almost by definition – never comparable. Different population? Not comparable. Different treatment pathway? No chance. Different utility measure? Ha! They may or may not appear to be similar statistically, but that’s totally irrelevant. What matters is whether the decision-maker ‘believes’ the values. If they believe them then they should be included and pooled. If decision-makers have reason to believe one source more or less than another then this should be accounted for in the weighting. If they don’t believe them at all then they should be excluded. Comparability is framed as a statistical question, when in reality it is a conceptual one. For now, researchers will have to tackle that themselves. This paper doesn’t solve all of the problems around meta-analysis of health state utility values, but it does a good job of outlining methodological developments to date and provides recommendations in accordance with them.

Unemployment, unemployment duration, and health: selection or causation? The European Journal of Health Economics [PubMed] Published 3rd May 2018

One of the major socioeconomic correlates of poor health is unemployment. It appears not to be very good for you. But there’s an obvious challenge here – does unemployment cause ill-health, or are unhealthy people just more likely to be unemployed? Both, probably, but that answer doesn’t make for clear policy solutions. This paper – following a large body of literature – attempts to explain what’s going on. Its novelty comes in the way the author considers timing and distinguishes between mental and physical health. The basis for the analysis is that selection into unemployment by the unhealthy ought to imply time-constant effects of unemployment on health. On the other hand, the negative effect of unemployment on health ought to grow over time. Using seven waves of data from the German Socio-economic Panel, a sample of 17,000 people (chopped from 48,000) is analysed, of which around 3,000 experienced unemployment. The basis for measuring mental and physical health is summary scores from the SF-12. A fixed-effects model is constructed based on the dependence of health on the duration and timing of unemployment, rather than just the occurrence of unemployment per se. The author finds a cumulative effect of unemployment on physical ill-health over time, implying causation. This is particularly pronounced for people unemployed in later life, and there was essentially no impact on physical health for younger people. The longer people spent unemployed, the more their health deteriorated. This was accompanied by a strong long-term selection effect of less physically healthy people being more likely to become unemployed. In contrast, for mental health, the findings suggest a short-term selection effect of people who experience a decline in mental health being more likely to become unemployed. But then, following unemployment, mental health declines further, so the balance of selection and causation effects is less clear. In contrast to physical health, people’s mental health is more badly affected by unemployment at younger ages. By no means does this study prove the balance between selection and causality. It can’t account for people’s anticipation of unemployment or future ill-health. But it does provide inspiration for better-targeted policies to limit the impact of unemployment on health.

Different domains – different time preferences? Social Science & Medicine [PubMed] Published 30th April 2018

Economists are often criticised by non-economists. Usually, the criticisms are unfounded, but one of the ways in which I think some (micro)economists can have tunnel vision is in thinking that preferences elicited with respect to money exhibit the same characteristics as preferences about things other than money. My instinct tells me that – for most people – that isn’t true. This study looks at one of those characteristics of preferences – namely, time preferences. Unfortunately for me, it suggests that my instincts aren’t correct. The authors outline a quasi-hyperbolic discounting model, incorporating both short-term present bias and long-term impatience, to explain gym members’ time preferences in the health and monetary domains. A survey was conducted with members of a chain of fitness centres in Denmark, of which 1,687 responded. Half were allocated to money-related questions and half to health-related questions. Respondents were asked to match an amount of future gains with an amount of immediate gains to provide a point of indifference. Health problems were formulated as back pain, with an EQ-5D-3L level 2 for usual activities and a level 2 for pain or discomfort. The findings were that estimates for discount rates and present bias in the two domains are different, but not by very much. On average, discount rates are slightly higher in the health domain – a finding driven by female respondents and people with more education. Present bias is the same – on average – in each domain, though retired people are more present biased for health. The authors conclude by focussing on the similarity between health and monetary time preferences, suggesting that time preferences in the monetary domain can safely be applied in the health domain. But I’d still be wary of this. For starters, one would expect a group of gym members – who have all decided to join the gym – to be relatively homogenous in their time preferences. Findings are similar on average, and there are only small differences in subgroups, but when it comes to health care (even public health) we’re never dealing with average people. Targeted interventions are increasingly needed, which means that differential discount rates in the health domain – of the kind identified in this study – should be brought into focus.

Credits

 

Lazaros Andronis’s journal round-up for 4th September 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

The effect of spending cuts on teen pregnancy. Journal of Health Economics [PubMed] Published July 2017

High teenage pregnancy rates are an important concern that features high in many countries’ social policy agendas. In the UK, a country which has one of the highest teen pregnancy rates in the world, efforts to tackle the issue have been spearheaded by the Teenage Pregnancy Strategy, an initiative aiming to halve under-18 pregnancy rates by offering access to sex education and contraception. However, the recent spending cuts have led to reductions in grants to local authorities, many of which have, in turn, limited or cut a number of teenage pregnancy-related programmes. This has led to vocal opposition by politicians and organisations, who argue that cuts jeopardise the reductions in teenage pregnancy rates seen in previous years. In this paper, Paton and Wright set out to examine whether this is the case; that is, whether cuts to Teenage Pregnancy Strategy-related services have had an impact on teenage pregnancy rates. To do so, the authors used panel data from 149 local authorities in England collected between 2009 and 2014. To capture changes in teenage pregnancy rates across local authorities over the specified period, the authors used a fixed effects model which assumed that under-18 conception rates are a function of annual expenditure on teenage pregnancy services per 13-17 year female in the local authority, and a set of other socioeconomic variables acting as controls. Area and year dummies were also included in the model to account for unobservable effects that relate to particular years and localities and a number of additional analysis were run to get around spurious correlations between expenditure and pregnancy rates. Overall, findings showed that areas which implemented bigger cuts to teenage pregnancy-targeting programmes have, on average, seen larger drops in teenage pregnancy rates. However, these drops are, in absolute terms, small (e.g. a 10% reduction in expenditure is associated with a 0.25% decrease in teenage conception rates). Various explanations can be put forward to interpret these findings, one of which is that cuts might have trimmed off superfluous or underperforming elements of the programme. If this is the case, Paton and Wright’s findings offer some support to arguments that spending cuts may not always be bad for the public.

Young adults’ experiences of neighbourhood smoking-related norms and practices: a qualitative study exploring place-based social inequalities in smoking. Social Science & Medicine [PubMed] Published September 2017

Smoking is a universal problem affecting millions of people around the world and Canada’s young adults are no exception. As in most countries, smoking prevalence and initiation is highest amongst young groups, which is bad news, as many people who start smoking at a young age continue to smoke throughout adulthood. Evidence suggests that there is a strong socioeconomic gradient in smoking, which can be seen in the fact that smoking prevalence is unequally distributed according to education and neighbourhood-level deprivation, being a greater problem in more deprived areas. This offers an opportunity for local-level interventions that may be more effective than national strategies. Though, to come up with such interventions, policy makers need to understand how neighbourhoods might shape, encourage or tolerate certain attitudes towards smoking. To understand this, Glenn and colleagues saw smoking as a practice that is closely related to local smoking norms and social structures, and sought to get young adult smokers’ views on how their neighbourhood affects their attitudes towards smoking. Within this context, the authors carried out a number of focus groups with young adult smokers who lived in four different neighbourhoods, during which they asked questions such as “do you think your neighbourhood might be encouraging or discouraging people to smoke?” Findings showed that some social norms, attitudes and practices were common among neighbourhoods of the same SES. Participants from low-SES neighbourhoods reported more tolerant and permissive local smoking norms, whereas in more affluent neighbourhoods, participants felt that smoking was more contained and regulated. While young smokers from high SES neighbourhoods expressed some degree of alignment and agency with local smoking norms and practices, smokers in low SES described smoking as inevitable in their neighbourhood. Of interest is how individuals living in different SES areas saw anti-smoking regulations: while young smokers in affluent areas advocate social responsibility (and downplay the role of regulations), their counterparts in poorer areas called for more protection and spoke in favour of greater government intervention and smoking restrictions. Glenn and colleagues’ findings serve to highlight the importance of context in designing public health measures, especially when such measures affect different groups in entirely different ways.

Cigarette taxes, smoking—and exercise? Health Economics [PubMed] Published August 2017

Evidence suggests that rises in cigarette taxes have a positive effect on smoking reduction and/or cessation. However, it is also plausible that the effect of tax hikes extends beyond smoking, to decisions about exercise. To explore whether this proposition is supported by empirical evidence, Conway and Niles put together a simple conceptual framework, which assumes that individuals aim to maximise the utility they get from exercise, smoking, health (or weight management) and other goods subject to market inputs (e.g. medical care, diet aids) and time and budget constraints. Much of the data for this analysis came from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in the US, which includes survey participants’ demographic characteristics (age, gender), as well as answers to questions about physical activities and exercise (e.g. intensity and time per week spent on activities) and smoking behaviour (e.g. current smoking status, number of cigarettes smoked per day). Survey data were subsequently combined with changes in cigarette taxes and other state-level variables. Conway and Niles’s results suggest that increased cigarette costs reduce both smoking and exercise, with the decline in exercise being more pronounced among heavy and regular smokers. However, the direction of the effect varied according to one’s age and smoking experience (e.g. higher cigarette cost increased physical activity among recent quitters), which highlights the need for caution in drawing conclusions about the exact mechanism that underpins this relationship. Encouraging smoking cessation and promoting physical exercise are important and desirable public health objectives, but, as Conway and Niles’s findings suggest, pursuing both of them at the same time may not always be plausible.

Credits

Alastair Canaway’s journal round-up for 10th July 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Use-of-time and health-related quality of life in 10- to 13-year-old children: not all screen time or physical activity minutes are the same. Quality of life Research [PubMedPublished 3rd July 2017

“If you watch too much TV, it’ll make your eyes square” – something I heard a lot as a child. This first paper explores whether this is true (sort of) by examining associations between aspects of time use and HRQL in children aged 10-13 (disclaimer: I peer reviewed it and was pleased to see them incorporate my views). This paper aims to examine how different types of time use are linked to HRQL. Time use was examined by the Multimedia Activity Recall for Children and Adolescents (MARCA) which separates out time into physical activity (sport, active transport, and play), screen time (TV, videogames, computer use), and sleep. The PedsQL was used to assess HRQL, whilst dual x-ray absorptiometry was used to accurately assess fatness. There were a couple of novel aspects to this study, first, the use of absorptiometry to accurately measure body fat percentage rather than the problematic BMI/skin folds in children; second, separating time out into specific components rather than just treating physical activity or screen time as homogeneous components. The primary findings were that for both genders, fatness (negative), sport (positive) and development stage (negative) were associated with HRQL. For boys, the most important other predictor of HRQL was videogames (negative) whilst predictors for girls included television (negative), active transport (negative) and household income (positive). With the exception of ‘active travel’ for girls, I don’t think any of these findings are particularly surprising. As with all cross-sectional studies of this nature, the authors give caution to the results: inability to demonstrate causality. Despite this, it opens the door for various possibilities for future research, and ideas for shaping future interventions in children this age.

Raise the bar, not the threshold value: meeting patient preferences for palliative and end-of-life care. PharmacoEconomics – Open Published 27th June 2017

Health care ≠ end of life care. Whilst health care seeks to maximise health, can the same be said for end of life care? Probably not. This June saw an editorial elaborating on this issue. Health is an important facet of end of life care. However, there are other substantial objects of value in this context e.g. preferences for place of care, preparedness, reducing family burdens etc. Evidence suggests that people at end of life can value these ‘other’ objects more than health status or life extension. Thus there is value beyond that captured by health. This is an issue for the QALY framework where health and length of life are the sole indicators of benefit. The editorial highlights that this is not people wishing for higher cost-per-QALY thresholds at end of life, instead, it is supporting the valuation of key elements of palliative care within the end of life context. It argues that palliative care interventions often are not amenable to integration with survival time in a QALY framework, this effectively implies that end of life care interventions should be evaluated in a separate framework to health care interventions altogether. The editorial discusses the ICECAP-Supportive Care Measure (designed for economic evaluation of end of life measures) as progress within this research context. An issue with this approach is that it doesn’t address allocative efficiency issues (and comparability) with ‘normal’ health care interventions. However, if end of life care is evaluated separately to regular healthcare, it will lead to better decisions within the EoL context. There is merit to this justification, after all, end of life care is often funded via third parties and arguments could, therefore, be made for adopting a separate framework. This, however, is a contentious area with lots of ongoing interest. For balance, it’s probably worth pointing out Chris’s (he did not ask me to put this in!) book chapter which debates many of these issues, specifically in relation to defining objects of value at end of life and whether the QALY should be altogether abandoned at EoL.

Investigating the relationship between costs and outcomes for English mental health providers: a bi-variate multi-level regression analysis. European Journal of Health Economics [PubMedPublished 24th June 2017

Payment systems that incentivise cost control and quality improvements are increasingly used. In England, until recently, mental health services have been funded via block contracts that do not necessarily incentivise cost control and payment has not been linked to outcomes. The National Tariff Payment System for reimbursement has now been introduced to mental health care. This paper harnesses the MHMDS (now called MHSDS) using multi-level bivariate regression to investigate whether it is possible to control costs without negatively affecting outcomes. It does this by examining the relationship between costs and outcomes for mental health providers. Due to the nature of the data, an appropriate instrumental variable was not available, and so it is important to note that the results do not imply causality. The primary results found that after controlling for key variables (demographics, need, social and treatment) there was a minuscule negative correlation between residual costs and outcomes with little evidence of a meaningful relationship. That is, the data suggest that outcome improvements could be made without incurring a lot more cost. This implies that cost-containment efforts by providers should not undermine outcome-improving efforts under the new payment systems. Something to bear in mind when interpreting the results is that there was a rather large list of limitations associated with the analysis, most notably that the analysis was conducted at a provider level. Although it’s continually improving, there still remain issues with the MHMDS data: poor diagnosis coding, missing outcome data, and poor quality of cost data. As somebody who is yet to use MHMDS data, but plans to in the future, this was a useful paper for generating ideas regarding what is possible and the associated limitations.

Credits