Thesis Thursday: Cheryl Jones

On the third Thursday of every month, we speak to a recent graduate about their thesis and their studies. This month’s guest is Dr Cheryl Jones who has a PhD from the University of Manchester. If you would like to suggest a candidate for an upcoming Thesis Thursday, get in touch.

Title
The economics of presenteeism in the context of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis
Supervisors
Katherine Payne, Suzanne Verstappen, Brenda Gannon
Repository link
https://www.research.manchester.ac.uk/portal/en/theses/the-economics-of-presenteeism-in-the-context-of-rheumatoid-arthritis-ankylosing-spondylitis-and-psoriatic-arthritis%288215e79a-925e-4664-9a3c-3fd42d643528%29.html

What attracted you to studying health-related presenteeism?

I was attracted to study presenteeism because it gave me a chance to address both normative and positive issues. Presenteeism, a concept related to productivity, is a controversial topic in the economic evaluation of healthcare technologies and is currently excluded from health economic evaluations, following the recommendation made by the NICE reference case. The reasons why productivity is excluded from economic evaluations are important and valid, however, there are some circumstances where excluding productivity is difficult to defend. Presenteeism offered an opportunity for me to explore and question the social value judgements that underpin economic evaluation methods with respect to productivity. In terms of positive issues related to presenteeism, research into the development of methods that can be used to measure and value presenteeism was (and still is) limited. This provided an opportunity to think creatively about the types of methods we could use, both quantitative and qualitative, to address and further methods for quantifying presenteeism.

Are existing tools adequate for measuring and valuing presenteeism in inflammatory arthritic conditions?

That is the question! Research into methods that can be used to quantify presenteeism is still in its infancy. Presenteeism is difficult to measure accurately because there are a lack of objective measures that can be used, for example, the number of cars assembled per day. As a consequence, many methods rely on self-report surveys, which tend to suffer from bias, such as reporting or recall bias. Methods that have been used to value presenteeism have largely focused on valuing presenteeism as a cost using the human capital approach (HCA: volume of presenteeism multiplied by a monetary factor). The monetary factor typically used to convert the volume of presenteeism into a cost value is wages. Valuing productivity using wages risks taking account of discriminatory factors that are associated with wages, such as age. There are also economic arguments that question whether the value of the wage truly reflects the value of productivity. My PhD focused on developing a method that values presenteeism as a non-monetary benefit, thereby avoiding the need to value it as a cost using wages. Overall, methods to measure and value presenteeism still have some way to go before a ‘gold standard’ can be established, however, there are many experts from many disciplines who are working to improve these methods.

Why was it important to conduct qualitative interviews as part of your research?

The quantitative component of my PhD was to develop an algorithm, using mapping methods, that links presenteeism with health status and capability measures. A study by Connolly et al. recommend conducting qualitative interviews to provide some evidence of face/content validity to establish whether a quantitative link between two measures (or concepts) is feasible and potentially valid. The qualitative study I conducted was designed to understand the extent to which the EQ-5D-5L, SF6D and ICECAP-C were able to capture those aspects of rheumatic conditions that negatively impact presenteeism. The results suggested that all three measures were able to capture those important aspects of rheumatic conditions that affect presenteeism; however, the results indicated that the SF6D would most likely be the most appropriate measure. The results from the quantitative mapping study identified the SF6D as the most suitable outcome measure able to predict presenteeism in working populations with rheumatic conditions. The advantage of the qualitative results was that it provided some evidence that explained why the SF6D was the more suitable measure rather than relying on speculation.

Is it feasible to predict presenteeism using outcome measures within economic evaluation?

I developed an algorithm that links presenteeism, measured using the Work Activity Productivity Impairment (WPAI) questionnaire, with health and capability. Health status was measured using the EQ-5D-5L and SF6D, and capability was measured using the ICECAP-A. The SF6D was identified as the most suitable measure to predict presenteeism in a population of employees with rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis. The results indicate that it is possible to predict presenteeism using generic outcome measures; however, the results have yet to be externally validated. The qualitative interviews provided evidence as to why the SF6D was the better predictor for presenteeism and the result gave rise to questions about the suitability of outcome measures given a specific population. The results indicate that it is potentially feasible to predict presenteeism using outcome measures.

What would be your key recommendation to a researcher hoping to capture the impact of an intervention on presenteeism?

Due to the lack of a ‘gold standard’ method for capturing the impact of presenteeism, I would recommend that the researcher reports and justifies their selection of the following:

  1. Provide a rationale that explains why presenteeism is an important factor that needs to be considered in the analysis.
  2. Explain how and why presenteeism will be captured and included in the analysis; as a cost, monetary benefit, or non-monetary benefit.
  3. Justify the methods used to measure and value presenteeism. It is important that the research clearly reports why specific tools, such as presenteeism surveys, have been selected for use.

Because there is no ‘gold standard’ method for measuring and valuing presenteeism and guidelines do not exist to inform the reporting of methods used to quantify presenteeism, it is important that the researcher reports and justifies their selection of methods used in their analysis.

Alastair Canaway’s journal round-up for 20th February 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

The estimation and inclusion of presenteeism costs in applied economic evaluation: a systematic review. Value in Health Published 30th January 2017

Presenteeism is one of those issues that you hear about from time to time, but rarely see addressed within economic evaluations. For those who haven’t come across it before, presenteeism refers to being at work, but not working at full capacity, for example, due to your health limiting your ability to work. The literature suggests that given presenteeism can have large associated costs which could significantly impact economic evaluations, it should be considered. These impacts are rarely captured in practice. This paper sought to identify studies where presenteeism costs were included, examined how valuation was approached and the degree of impact of including presenteeism on costs. The review included cost of illness studies as well as economic evaluations, just 28 papers had attempted to capture the costs of presenteeism, these were in a wide variety of disease areas. A range of methods was used, across all studies, presenteeism costs accounted for 52% (range from 19%-85%) of the total costs relating to the intervention and disease. This is a vast proportion and significantly outweighed absenteeism costs. Presenteeism is clearly a significant issue, yet widely ignored within economic evaluation. This in part may be due to the health and social care perspective advised within the NICE reference case and compounded by the lack of guidance in how to measure and value productivity costs. Should an economic evaluation pursue a societal perspective, the findings suggest that capturing and valuing presenteeism costs should be a priority.

Priority to end of life treatments? Views of the public in the Netherlands. Value in Health Published 5th January 2017

Everybody dies, and thus, end of life care is probably something that we should all have at least a passing interest in. The end of life context is an incredibly tricky research area with methodological pitfalls at every turn. End of life care is often seen as ‘different’ to other care, and this is reflected in NICE having supplementary guidance for the appraisal of end of life interventions. Similarly, in the Netherlands, treatments that do not meet typical cost per QALY thresholds may be provided should public support be sufficient. There, however, is a dearth of such evidence, and this paper sought to elucidate this issue using the novel Q methodology. Three primary viewpoints emerged: 1) Access to healthcare as a human right – all have equal rights regardless of setting, that is, nobody is more important. Viewpoint one appeared to reject the notion of scarce resources when it comes to health: ‘you can’t put a price on life’. 2) The second group focussed on providing the ‘right’ care for those with terminal illness and emphasised that quality of life should be respected and unnecessary care at end of life should be avoided. This second group did not place great importance on cost-effectiveness but did acknowledge that costly treatments at end of life might not be the best use of money. 3) Finally, the third group felt there should be a focus on care which is effective and efficient, that is, those treatments which generate the most health should be prioritised. There was a consensus across all three groups that the ultimate goal of the health system is to generate the greatest overall health benefit for the population. This rejects the notion that priority should be given to those at end of life and the study concludes that across the three groups there was minimal support for the possibility of the terminally ill being treated with priority.

Methodological issues surrounding the use of baseline health-related quality of life data to inform trial-based economic evaluations of interventions within emergency and critical care settings: a systematic literature review. PharmacoEconomics [PubMed] Published 6th January 2017

Catchy title. Conducting research within emergency and critical settings presents a number of unique challenges. For the health economist seeking to conduct a trial based economic evaluation, one such issue relates to the calculation of QALYs. To calculate QALYs within a trial, baseline and follow-up data are required. For obvious reasons – severe and acute injuries/illness, unplanned admission – collecting baseline data on those entering emergency and critical care is problematic. Even when patients are conscious, there are ethical issues surrounding collecting baseline data in this setting, the example used relates to somebody being conscious after cardiac arrest, is it appropriate to be getting them to complete HRQL questionnaires? Probably not. Various methods have been used to circumnavigate this issue; this paper sought to systematically review the methods that have been used and provide guidance for future studies. Just 19 studies made it through screening, thus highlighting the difficulty of research in this context. Just one study prospectively collected baseline HRQL data, and this was restricted to patients in a non-life threatening state. Four different strategies were adopted in the remaining papers. Eight studies adopted a fixed health utility for all participants at baseline, four used only the available data, that is, from the first time point where HRQL was measured. One asked patients to retrospectively recall their baseline state, whilst one other used Delphi methods to derive EQ-5D states from experts. The paper examines the implications and limitations of adopting each of these strategies. The key finding seems to relate to whether or not the trial arms are balanced with respect to HRQL at baseline. This obviously isn’t observed, the authors suggest trial covariates should instead be used to explore this, and adjustments made where applicable. If, and that’s a big if, trial arms are balanced, then all of the four methods suggested should give similar answers. It seems the key here is the randomisation, however, even the best randomisation techniques do not always lead to balanced arms and there is no guarantee of baseline balance. The authors conclude trials should aim to make an initial assessment of HRQL at the earliest opportunity and that further research is required to thoroughly examine how the different approaches will impact cost-effectiveness results.

Credits

The economics of bereavement

I recently signed up for a clinical trial (www.intervalstudy.org.uk). The baseline questionnaire included the SF-36. Under normal circumstances I would be at full health for all questions but, on this occasion, I was not. If the researchers go on to estimate my SF-6D score, my ‘utility’ will be suboptimal. The reason for this is that I recently lost a loved one.

There are many problems with the way we value death; some have been discussed on this blog. One which has become clear to me recently is that we don’t seem to fully take into account the effect on others of a person’s death. Whether or not we should is another question, but it’s worth considering what we might be missing.

Utility losses

Bereavement has been shown to cause substantial mental distress. This should come as no surprise. Whether or not this distress is sufficiently ‘health-related’ for our current method of valuing health is debatable. However, as demonstrated above, our current tools are likely to reflect this distress. More concretely, bereavement has been identified as a trigger for depression in older people. Conjugal bereavement has also been shown to increase mortality (even when controlling for changes in health care utilisation).

Clearly, bereavement due to an individual’s death can affect a person’s health-related quality of life.

Productivity losses

Sometimes, in an economic evaluation, we might collect data regarding time taken off work due to a partner’s or a child’s illness. Usually this will be in relation to the sick person needing some extra care. It is less common to collect information about time off work due to bereavement. In the UK there is no law granting people a right to compassionate leave, and its provision is at an employer’s discretion. Nevertheless, people do take compassionate leave. Within a family, productivity losses from absenteeism could extend to weeks or months.

Losses from presenteeism are also likely to be high. A link between well-being and productivity has been identified; bereavement is likely to lead to a drop in productivity.There is some evidence on the labour market effects of the loss of a child. Not only are people more likely to lose income and lose their jobs, but they are also more likely to leave the labour market altogether.

Remaining questions

It seems important to collect data, at least from immediate family members, regarding the effects of bereavement. I know that work is currently underway to properly capture carers’ utility, and this is likely to raise similar ethical questions. Given the evidence highlighted above, it seems that services to address bereavement could be cost-effective. Their current provision in the English NHS is limited. NICE don’t have much to say on the matter.

Fully taking the above into account raises some equity issues that need considering. If the death is unexpected there is likely to be a greater loss in productivity and utility; should interventions to prevent these deaths be prioritised? Should we prioritise interventions for people with more friends? I don’t know, but it seems likely that we should be doing things that we currently are not.