Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 27th August 2018

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Ethically acceptable compensation for living donations of organs, tissues, and cells: an unexploited potential? Applied Health Economics and Health Policy [PubMed] Published 25th August 2018

Around the world, there are shortages of organs for transplantation. In economics, the debate around the need to increase organ donation can be frustratingly ignorant of ethical and distributional concerns. So it’s refreshing to see this article attempting to square concerns about efficiency and equity. The authors do so by using a ‘spheres of justice’ framework. This is the idea that different social goods should be distributed according to different principles. So, while we might be happy for brocolli and iPhones to be distributed on the basis of free exchange, we might want health to be distributed on the basis of need. The argument can be extended to state that – for a just situation to prevail – certain exchanges between these spheres of justice (e.g. health for iPhones) should never take place. This idea might explain why – as the authors demonstrate with a review of European countries – policy tends not to allow monetary compensation for organ donation.

The paper cleverly sets out to taxonomise monetary and non-monetary reimbursement and compensation with reference to individuals’ incentives and the spheres of justice principles. From this, the authors reach two key conclusions. Firstly, that (monetary) reimbursement of donors’ expenses (e.g. travel costs or lost earnings) is ethically sound as this does not constitute an incentive to donate but rather removes existing disincentives. Secondly, that non-monetary compensation could be deemed ethical.

Three possible forms of non-monetary compensation are discussed: i) prioritisation, ii) free access, and iii) non-health care-related benefits. The first could involve being given priority for receiving organs, or it could extend to the jumping of other health care waiting lists. I think this is more problematic than the authors let on because it asserts that health care should – at least in part – be distributed according to desert rather than need. The second option – free access – could mean access to health care that people would otherwise have to pay for. The third option could involve access to other social goods such as education or housing.

This is an interesting article and an enjoyable read, but I don’t think it provides a complete solution. Maybe I’m just too much of a Marxist, but I think that this – as all other proposals – fails to distribute from each according to ability. That is, we’d still expect non-monetary compensation to incentivise poorer (and on average less healthy) people to donate organs, thus exacerbating health inequality. This is because i) poorer people are more likely to need the non-monetary benefits and ii) we live in a capitalist society in which there is almost nothing that money can’t by and which is strictly non-monetary. Show me a proposal that increases donation rates from those who can most afford to donate them (i.e. the rich and healthy).

Selecting bolt-on dimensions for the EQ-5D: examining their contribution to health-related quality of life. Value in Health Published 18th August 2018

Measures such as the EQ-5D are used to describe health-related quality of life as completely and generically as possible. But there is a trade-off between completeness and the length of the questionnaire. Necessarily, there are parts of the evaluative space that measures will not capture because they are a simplification. If the bit they’re missing is important to your patient group, that’s a problem. You might fancy a bolt-on. But how do we decide which areas of the evaluative space should be more completely included in the measure? Which bolt-ons should be used? This paper seeks to provide means of answering these questions.

The article builds on an earlier piece of work that was included in an earlier journal round-up. In the previous paper, the authors used factor analysis to identify candidate bolt-ons. The goal of this paper is to outline an approach for specifying which of these candidates ought to be used. Using data from the Multi-Instrument Comparison study, the authors fit linear regressions to see how well 37 candidate bolt-on items explain differences in health-related quality of life. The 37 items correspond to six different domains: energy/vitality, satisfaction, relationships, hearing, vision, and speech. In a second test, the authors explored whether the bolt-on candidates could explain differences in health-related quality of life associated with six chronic conditions. Health-related quality of life is defined according to a visual analogue scale, which notably does not correspond to that used in the EQ-5D but rather uses a broader measure of physical, mental, and social health.

The results suggest that items related to energy/vitality, relationships, and satisfaction explained a significant part of health-related quality of life on top of the existing EQ-5D dimensions. The implication is that these could be good candidates for bolt-ons. The analysis of the different conditions was less clear.

For me, there’s a fundamental problem with this study. It moves the goals posts. Bolt-ons are about improving the extent to which a measure can more accurately represent the evaluative space that it is designed to characterise. In this study, the authors use a broader definition of health-related quality of life that – as far as I can tell – the EQ-5D is not designed to capture. We’re not dealing with bolt-ons, we’re dealing with extensions to facilitate expansions to the evaluative space. Nevertheless, the method could prove useful if combined with a more thorough consideration of the evaluative space.

Sources of health financing and health outcomes: a panel data analysis. Health Economics [PubMed] [RePEc] Published 15th August 2018

There is a growing body of research looking at the impact that health (care) spending has on health outcomes. Usually, these studies don’t explicitly look at who is doing the spending. In this study, the author distinguishes between public and private spending and attempts to identify which type of spending (if either) results in greater health improvements.

The author uses data from the World Bank’s World Development Indicators for 1995-2014. Life expectancy at birth is adopted as the primary health outcome and the key expenditure variables are health expenditure as a share of GDP and private health expenditure as a share of total health expenditure. Controlling for a variety of other variables, including some determinants of health such as income and access to an improved water source, a triple difference analysis is described. The triple difference estimator corresponds to the difference in health outcomes arising from i) differences in the private expenditure level, given ii) differences in total expenditure, over iii) time.

The key finding from the study is that, on average, private expenditure is more effective in increasing life expectancy at birth than public expenditure. The author also looks at government effectiveness, which proves crucial. The finding in favour of private expenditure entirely disappears when only countries with effective government are considered. There is some evidence that public expenditure is more effective in these countries, and this is something that future research should investigate further. For countries with ineffective governments, the implication is that policy should be directed towards increasing overall health care expenditure by increasing private expenditure.

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Alastair Canaway’s journal round-up for 30th July 2018

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Is there an association between early weight status and utility-based health-related quality of life in young children? Quality of Life Research [PubMed] Published 10th July 2018

Childhood obesity is an issue which has risen to prominence in recent years. Concurrently, there has been an increased interest in measuring utility values in children for use in economic evaluation. In the obesity context, there are relatively few studies that have examined whether childhood weight status is associated with preference-based utility and, following, whether such measures are useful for the economic evaluation of childhood obesity interventions. This study sought to tackle this issue using the proxy version of the Health Utilities Index Mark 3 (HUI-3) and weight status data in 368 children aged five years. Associations between weight status and HUI-3 score were assessed using various regression techniques. No statistically significant differences were found between weight status and preference-based health-related quality of life (HRQL). This adds to several recent studies with similar findings which imply that young children may not experience any decrements in HRQL associated with weight status, or that the measures we have cannot capture these decrements. When considering trial-based economic evaluation of childhood obesity interventions, this highlights that we should not be solely relying on preference-based instruments.

Time is money: investigating the value of leisure time and unpaid work. Value in Health Published 14th July 2018

For those of us who work on trials, we almost always attempt to do some sort of ‘societal’ perspective incorporating benefits beyond health. When it comes to valuing leisure time and unpaid work there is a dearth of literature and numerous methodological challenges which has led to a bit of a scatter-gun approach to measuring and valuing (usually by ignoring) this time. The authors in the paper sought to value unpaid work (e.g. household chores and voluntary work) and leisure time (“non-productive” time to be spent on one’s likings, nb. this includes lunch breaks). They did this using online questionnaires which included contingent valuation exercises (WTP and WTA) in a sample of representative adults in the Netherlands. Regression techniques following best practice were used (two-part models with transformed data). Using WTA they found an additional hour of unpaid work and leisure time was valued at €16 Euros, whilst the WTP value was €9.50. These values fall into similar ranges to those used in other studies. There are many issues with stated preference studies, which the authors thoroughly acknowledge and address. These costs, so often omitted in economic evaluation, have the potential to be substantial and there remains a need to accurately value this time. Capturing and valuing these time costs remains an important issue, specifically, for those researchers working in countries where national guidelines for economic evaluation prefer a societal perspective.

The impact of depression on health-related quality of life and wellbeing: identifying important dimensions and assessing their inclusion in multi-attribute utility instruments. Quality of Life Research [PubMed] Published 13th July 2018

At the start of every trial, we ask “so what measures should we include?” In the UK, the EQ-5D is the default option, though this decision is not often straightforward. Mental health disorders have a huge burden of impact in terms of both costs (economic and healthcare) and health-related quality of life. How we currently measure the impact of such disorders in economic evaluation often receives scrutiny and there has been recent interest in broadening the evaluative space beyond health to include wellbeing, both subjective wellbeing (SWB) and capability wellbeing (CWB). This study sought to identify which dimensions of HRQL, SWB and CWB were most affected by depression (the most common mental health disorder) and to examine the sensitivity of existing multi-attribute utility instruments (MAUIs) to these dimensions. The study used data from the “Multi-Instrument Comparison” study – this includes lots of measures, including depression measures (Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, Kessler Psychological Distress Scale); SWB measures (Personal Wellbeing Index, Satisfaction with Life Scale, Integrated Household Survey); CWB (ICECAP-A); and multi-attribute utility instruments (15D, AQoL-4D, AQoL-8D, EQ-5D-5L, HUI-3, QWB-SA, and SF-6D). To identify dimensions that were important, the authors used the ‘Glass’s Delta effect size’ (the difference between the mean scores of healthy and self-reported groups divided by the standard deviation of the healthy group). To investigate the extent to which current MAUIs capture these dimensions, each MAUI was regressed on each dimension of HRQL, CWB and SWB. There were lots of interesting findings. Unsurprisingly, the most important dimensions were in the psychosocial dimensions of HRQL (e.g. the ‘coping’, ‘happiness’, and ‘self-worth’ dimensions of the AQoL-8D). Interestingly, the ICECAP-A proved to be the best measure for distinguishing between healthy individuals and those with depression. The SWB measures, on the other hand, were less impacted by depression. Of the MAUIs, the AQoL-8D was the most sensitive, whilst our beloved EQ-5D-5L and SF-6D were the least sensitive at distinguishing dimensions. There is a huge amount to unpack within this study, but it does raise interesting questions regarding measurement issues and the impact of broadening the evaluative space for decision makers. Finally, it’s worth noting that a new MAUI (ReQoL) for mental health has been recently developed – although further testing is needed, this is something to consider in future.

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Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 23rd July 2018

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Quantifying life: understanding the history of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Social Science & Medicine [PubMed] Published 3rd July 2018

We’ve had some fun talking about the history of the QALY here on this blog. The story of how the QALY came to be important in health policy has been obscured. This paper seeks to address that. The research adopts a method called ‘multiple streams analysis’ (MSA) in order to explain how QALYs caught on. The MSA framework identifies three streams – policy, politics, and problems – and considers the ‘policy entrepreneurs’ involved. For this study, archival material was collected from the National Archives, Department of Health files, and the University of York. The researchers also conducted 44 semi-structured interviews with academics and civil servants.

The problem stream highlights shocks to the UK economy in the late 1960s, coupled with growth in health care costs due to innovations and changing expectations. Cost-effectiveness began to be studied and, increasingly, policymaking was meant to be research-based and accountable. By the 80s, the likes of Williams and Maynard were drawing attention to apparent inequities and inefficiencies in the health service. The policy stream gets going in the 40s and 50s when health researchers started measuring quality of life. By the early 60s, the idea of standardising these measures to try and rank health states was on the table. Through the late 60s and early 70s, government economists proliferated and proved themselves useful in health policy. The meeting of Rachel Rosser and Alan Williams in the mid-70s led to the creation of QALYs as we know them, combining quantity and quality of life on a 0-1 scale. Having acknowledged inefficiencies and inequities in the health service, UK politicians and medics were open to new ideas, but remained unconvinced by the QALY. Yet it was a willingness to consider the need for rationing that put the wheels in motion for NICE, and the politics stream – like the problem and policy stream – characterises favourable conditions for the use of the QALY.

The MSA framework also considers ‘policy entrepreneurs’ who broker the transition from idea to implementation. The authors focus on the role of Alan Williams and of the Economic Advisers’ Office. Williams was key in translating economic ideas into forms that policymakers could understand. Meanwhile, the Economic Advisers’ Office encouraged government economists to engage with academics at HESG and later the QoL Measurement Group (which led to the creation of EuroQol).

The main takeaway from the paper is that good ideas only prevail in the right conditions and with the right people. It’s important to maintain multi-disciplinary and multi-stakeholder networks. In the case of the QALY, the two-way movement of economists between government and academia was crucial.

I don’t completely understand or appreciate the MSA framework, but this paper is an enjoyable read. My only reservation is with the way the authors describe the QALY as being a dominant aspect of health policy in the UK. I don’t think that’s right. It’s dominant within a niche of a niche of a niche – that is, health technology assessment for new pharmaceuticals. An alternative view is that the QALY has in fact languished in a quiet corner of British policymaking, and been completely excluded in some other countries.

Accuracy of patient recall for self‐reported doctor visits: is shorter recall better? Health Economics [PubMed] Published 2nd July 2018

In designing observational studies, such as clinical trials, I have always recommended that self-reported resource use be collected no less frequently than every 3 months. This is partly based on something I once read somewhere that I can’t remember, but partly also on some logic that the accuracy of people’s recall decays over time. This paper has come to tell me how wrong I’ve been.

The authors start by highlighting that recall can be subject to omission, whereby respondents forget relevant information, or commission, whereby respondents include events that did not occur. A key manifestation of the latter is ‘telescoping’, whereby events are included from outside the recall period. We might expect commission to be more likely in short recalls and omission to be more common for long recalls. But there’s very little research on this regarding health service use.

This study uses data from a large trial in diabetes care in Australia, in which 5,305 participants were randomised to receive either 2-week, 3-month, or 12-month recall for how many times they had seen a doctor. Then, the trial data were matched with Medicare data to identify the true levels of resource use.

Over 92% of 12-month recall participants made an error, 76% of the 3-month recall, and 46% of the 2-week recall. The patterns of errors were different. There was very little under-reporting in the 2-week recall sample, with 3-month giving the most over-reporting and 12-month giving the most under-reporting. 12-month recall was associated with the largest number of days reported in error. However, when the authors account for the longer period being considered, and estimate a relative error, the impact of misreporting is smallest for the 12-month recall and greatest for the 2-week recall. This translates into a smaller overall bias for the longest recall period. The authors also find that older, less educated, unemployed, and low‐income patients exhibit higher measurement errors.

Health surveys and comparative studies that estimate resource use over a long period of time should use 12-month recall unless they can find a reason to do otherwise. The authors provide some examples from economic evaluations to demonstrate how selecting shorter recall periods could result in recommending the wrong decisions. It’s worth trying to understand the reasons why people can more accurately recall service use over 12 months. That way, data collection methods could be designed to optimise recall accuracy.

Who should receive treatment? An empirical enquiry into the relationship between societal views and preferences concerning healthcare priority setting. PLoS One [PubMed] Published 27th June 2018

Part of the reason the QALY faces opposition is that it has been used in a way that might not reflect societal preferences for resource allocation. In particular, the idea that ‘a QALY is a QALY is a QALY’ may conflict with notions of desert, severity, or process. We’re starting to see more evidence for groups of people holding different views, which makes it difficult to come up with decision rules to maximise welfare. This study considers some of the perspectives that people adopt, which have been identified in previous research – ‘equal right to healthcare’, ‘limits to healthcare’, and ‘effective and efficient healthcare’ – and looks at how they are distributed in the Netherlands. Using four willingness to trade-off (WTT) exercises, the authors explore the relationship between these views and people’s preferences about resource allocation. Trade-offs are between quality vs quantity of life, health maximisation vs equality, children vs the elderly, and lifestyle-related risk vs adversity. The authors sought to test several hypotheses: i) that ‘equal right’ respondents have a lower WTT; ii) ‘limits to healthcare’ people express a preference for health gains, health maximisation, and treating people with adversity; and iii) ‘effective and efficient’ people support health maximisation, treating children, and treating people with adversity.

A representative online sample of adults in the Netherlands (n=261) was recruited. The first part of the questionnaire collected socio-demographic information. The second part asked questions necessary to allocate people to one of the three perspectives using Likert scales based on a previous study. The third part of the questionnaire consisted of the four reimbursement scenarios. Participants were asked to identify the point (in terms of the relevant quantities) at which they would be indifferent between two options.

The distribution of the viewpoints was 65% ‘equal right’, 23% ‘limits to healthcare’, and 7% ‘effective and efficient’. 6% couldn’t be matched to one of the three viewpoints. In each scenario, people had the option to opt out of trading. 24% of respondents were non-traders for all scenarios and, of these, 78% were of the ‘equal right’ viewpoint. Unfortunately, a lot of people opted out of at least one of the trades, and for a wide variety of reasons. Decisionmakers can’t opt out, so I’m not sure how useful this is.

The authors describe many associations between individual characteristics, viewpoints, and WTT results. But the tested hypotheses were broadly supported. While the findings showed that different groups were more or less willing to trade, the points of indifference for traders within the groups did not vary. So while you can’t please everyone in health care priority setting, this study shows how policies might be designed to satisfy the preferences of people with different perspectives.

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