Sam Watson’s journal round-up for 26th November 2018

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Alcohol and self-control: a field experiment in India. American Economic Review Forthcoming

Addiction is complex. For many people it is characterised by a need or compulsion to take something, often to prevent withdrawal, often in conflict with a desire to not take it. This conflicts with Gary Becker’s much-maligned rational theory of addiction, which views the addiction as a choice to maximise utility in the long term. Under Becker’s model, one could use market-based mechanisms to end repeated, long-term drug or alcohol use. By making the cost of continuing to use higher then people would choose to stop. This has led to the development of interventions like conditional payment or cost mechanisms: a user would receive a payment on condition of sobriety. Previous studies, however, have found little evidence people would be willing to pay for such sobriety contracts. This article reports a randomised trial among rickshaw drivers in Chennai, India, a group of people with a high prevalence of high alcohol use and dependency. The three trial arms consisted of a control arm who received an unconditional daily payment, a treatment arm who received a small payment plus extra if they passed a breathalyser test, and a third arm who had the choice between either of the two payment mechanisms. Two findings are of much interest. First, the incentive payments significantly increased daytime sobriety, and second, over half the participants preferred the conditional sobriety payments over the unconditional payments when they were weakly dominated, and a third still preferred them even when the unconditional payments were higher than the maximum possible conditional payment. This conflicts with a market-based conception of addiction and its treatment. Indeed, the nature of addiction means it can override all intrinsic motivation to stop, or do anything else frankly. So it makes sense that individuals are willing to pay for extrinsic motivation, which in this case did make a difference.

Heterogeneity in long term health outcomes of migrants within Italy. Journal of Health Economics [PubMed] [RePEc] Published 2nd November 2018

We’ve discussed neighbourhood effects a number of times on this blog (here and here, for example). In the absence of a randomised allocation to different neighbourhoods or areas, it is very difficult to discern why people living there or who have moved there might be better or worse off than elsewhere. This article is another neighbourhood effects analysis, this time framed through the lens of immigration. It looks at those who migrated within Italy in the 1970s during a period of large northward population movements. The authors, in essence, identify the average health and mental health of people who moved to different regions conditional on duration spent in origin destinations and a range of other factors. The analysis is conceptually similar to that of two papers we discussed at length on internal migration in the US and labour market outcomes in that it accounts for the duration of ‘exposure’ to poorer areas and differences between destinations. In the case of the labour market outcomes papers, the analysis couldn’t really differentiate between a causal effect of a neighbourhood increasing human capital, differences in labour market conditions, and unobserved heterogeneity between migrating people and families. Now this article examining Italian migration looks at health outcomes, such as the SF-12, which limit the explanations since one cannot ‘earn’ more health by moving elsewhere. Nevertheless, the labour market can still impact upon health strongly.

The authors carefully discuss the difficulties in identifying causal effects here. A number of model extensions are also estimated to try to deal with some issues discussed. This includes a type of propensity score weighting approach, although I would emphasize that this categorically does not deal with issues of unobserved heterogeneity. A finite mixture model is also estimated. Generally a well-thought-through analysis. However, there is a reliance on statistical significance here. I know I do bang on about statistical significance a lot, but it is widely used inappropriately. A rule of thumb I’ve adopted for reviewing papers for journals is that if the conclusions would change if you changed the statistical significance threshold then there’s probably an issue. This article would fail that test. They use a threshold of p<0.10 which seems inappropriate for an analysis with a sample size in the tens of thousands and they build a concluding narrative around what is and isn’t statistically significant. This is not to detract from the analysis, merely its interpretation. In future, this could be helped by banning asterisks in tables, like the AER has done, or better yet developing submission guidelines around its use.

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Sam Watson’s journal round-up for 7th August 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Financing transformative health systems towards achievement of the health Sustainable Development Goals: a model for projected resource needs in 67 low-income and middle-income countries. Lancet: Global Health [PubMedPublished 17th July 2017

Achieving universal health coverage is a key aspect of the UN’s sustainable development goals. However, what this means in practice is complicated. People need to be able to access health services free at the point of use, but once those services are accessed there needs to be sufficient labour, capital, skill, and quality to correctly diagnose and treat them. For many health systems worldwide, this will require large investments in infrastructure and staffing, but the potential cost of achieving these goals is unclear. This article sets out to estimate these costs. Clearly, this is a complicated task – health care systems are incredibly complex. From a basic microeconomic standpoint, one might need some understanding of the production function of different health care systems, and the marginal productivity of labour and capital inputs to these systems. There is generally good evidence of what is effective and cost-effective for the treatment of different diseases, and so given the amenable disease burden for a particular country, we could begin to understand what would be required to combat it. This is how this article tackles this question, more or less. They take a bottom-up costing approach to a wide range of interventions, governance requirements, and, where required, other interventions such as water and sanitation. However, there are other mechanisms at play. At national levels, economies of scale and scope play a role. Integration of care programs can reduce the costs, improve the quality, or both, of the individual programs. Similarly, the levels of investment considered are likely to have relevant macroeconomic effects, boosting employment, income, and subsequent socioeconomic indicators. Credit is due to the authors, they do consider financing and health impacts of investment, and their paper is the most comprehensive to date on the topic. However, their projections (~$300 billion annually) are perhaps more uncertain than they let on, a criticism I made of similar papers recently. While I should remind myself not to let the perfect be the enemy of the good, detailed case studies of particular countries may help me to see how the spreadsheet model may actually translate into real-world changes.

Precommitment, cash transfers, and timely arrival for birth: evidence from a randomized controlled trial in Nairobi Kenya. American Economic Review [RePEcPublished May 2017

A great proportion of the gains in life expectancy in recent years has been through the reduction of childhood mortality. The early years of life are some of the most precarious. A newborn child, if she survives past five years of age, will not face the same risk of dying until late adulthood. Many of the same risk factors that contribute to childhood mortality also contribute to maternal death rates and many low-income countries still face unacceptably high rates of dying for both mother and child. One way of tackling this is to ensure mothers have access to adequate antenatal and postnatal care. In Kenya, for example, the government legislated to provide free delivery services in government health facilities in 2013. However, Kenya still has some of the highest death rates for mother and child in the world. It is speculated that one reason for this is the delay in receiving services in the case of complications with a pregnancy. A potential cause of this delay in Nairobi is a lack of adequate planning from women who face a large number of heterogeneous treatment options for birth. This study presents an RCT in which pregnant women were offered a “precommitment transfer package”, which consisted of a cash transfer of 1000 KSh (~£7) during pregnancy and a further 1000 KSh if women stuck to a delivery plan they had earlier committed to. The transfer was found to increase the proportion of women arriving early to delivery facilities. The study was a fairly small pilot study and the results somewhat uncertain, but the intervention appears promising. Cost-effectiveness comparisons are warranted with other interventions aiming to achieve the same ends.

Bans on electronic cigarette sales to minors and smoking among high school students. Journal of Health Economics [PubMedPublished July 2017

E-cigarettes have provoked quite a debate among public health researchers and campaigners as we’ve previously discussed. E-cigarettes are a substitute for tobacco smoking and are likely to be significantly less harmful. They may have contributed to large declines in the use of tobacco in the UK in the last few years. However, some have taken a “think of the children!” position. While e-cigarette use per se among adolescents may not be a significant public health issue, it could lead to increased use of tobacco. Others have countered that those young people using e-cigarettes would have been those that used tobacco anyway, so banning e-cigarettes among minors may lead them to go back to the tobacco. This paper takes data from repeated surveys of high school students in the US to estimate the effects of banning the sale of e-cigarettes to minors on the prevalence of tobacco smoking. Interestingly, bans appear to reduce tobacco smoking prevalence; the results appear fairly robust and the modelling is sensible. This conflicts with other recent similar studies. The authors argue that this shows that e-cigarettes and tobacco smoking are complements, so reducing one reduces the other. But I am not sure this explains the decline since no increase in youth smoking was observed as e-cigarettes became more popular. Certainly, such a ban would not have reduced smoking prevalence years ago. At the very least e-cigarettes have clearly had a significant effect on attitudes towards smoking. Perhaps smoking was on the decline anyway – but the authors estimate a model with state-specific time trends, and no declines were seen in control states. Whatever our prior beliefs about the efficacy of regulating or banning e-cigarettes, the evidence is complex, reflecting the complex behaviour of people towards drugs, alcohol, and tobacco.

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Thesis Thursday: Raymond Oppong

On the third Thursday of every month, we speak to a recent graduate about their thesis and their studies. This month’s guest is Dr Raymond Oppong who graduated with a PhD from the University of Birmingham. If you would like to suggest a candidate for an upcoming Thesis Thursday, get in touch.

Title
Economic analysis alongside multinational studies
Supervisors
Sue Jowett, Tracy Roberts
Repository link
http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/7288/

What attracted you to studying economic evaluation in the context of multinational studies?

One of the first projects that I was involved in when I started work as a health economist was the Genomics to combat Resistance against Antibiotics in Community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) in Europe (GRACE) project. This was an EU-funded study aimed at integrating and coordinating the activities of physicians and scientists from institutions in 14 European countries to combat antibiotic resistance in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections.

My first task on this project was to undertake a multinational costing study to estimate the costs of treating acute cough/LRTI in Europe. I faced quite a number of challenges including the lack of unit cost data across countries. Conducting a full economic evaluation alongside the interventional studies in GRACE also brought up a number of issues with respect to methods of analysis of multinational trials which needed to be resolved. The desire to understand and resolve some of these issues led me to undertake the PhD to investigate the implications of conducting economic evaluations alongside multinational studies.

Your thesis includes some case studies from a large multinational project. What were the main findings of your empirical work?

I used three main case studies for my empirical work. The first was an observational study aimed at describing the current presentation, investigation, treatment and outcomes of community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections and analysing the determinants of antibiotic use in Europe. The other 2 were RCTs. The first was aimed at studying the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy (amoxicillin) in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections, whilst the second was aimed at assessing training interventions to improve antibiotic prescribing behaviour by general practitioners. The observational study was used to explore issues relating to costing and outcomes in multinational studies whilst the RCTs explored the various analytical approaches (pooled and split) to economic evaluation alongside multinational studies.

The results from the observational study revealed large variations in costs across Europe and showed that contacting researchers in individual countries was the most effective way of obtaining unit costs. Results from both RCTs showed that the choice of whether to pool or split data had an impact on the cost-effectiveness of the interventions.

What were the key analytical methods used in your analysis?

The overall aim of the thesis was to study the implications of conducting economic analysis alongside multinational studies. Specific objectives include: i) documenting challenges associated with economic evaluations alongside multinational studies, ii) exploring various approaches to obtaining and estimating unit costs, iii) exploring the impact of using different tariffs to value EQ-5D health state descriptions, iv) comparing methods that have been used to conduct economic evaluation alongside multinational studies and v) making recommendations to guide the design and conduct of future economic evaluations carried out alongside multinational studies.

A number of approaches were used to achieve each of the objectives. A systematic review of the literature identified challenges associated with economic evaluations alongside multinational studies. A four-stage approach to obtaining unit costs was assessed. The UK, European and country-specific EQ-5D value sets were compared to determine which is the most appropriate to use in the context of multinational studies. Four analytical approaches – fully pooled one country costing, fully pooled multicountry costing, fully split one country costing and fully split multicountry costing – were compared in terms of resource use, costs, health outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Finally, based on the findings of the study, a set of recommendations were developed.

You completed your PhD part-time while working as a researcher. Did you find this a help or a hindrance to your studies?

I must say that it was both a help and a hindrance. Working in a research environment was really helpful. There was a lot of support from supervisors and colleagues which kept me motivated. I might have not gotten this support if I was not working in a research/academic environment. However, even though some time during the week was allocated to the PhD, I had to completely put it on hold for long periods of time in order to deal with the pressures of work/research. Consequently, I always had to struggle to find my bearings when I got back to the PhD. I also spent most weekends working on the PhD especially when I was nearing submission.

On the whole, it should be noted that a part-time PhD requires a lot of time management skills. I personally had to go on time management courses which were really helpful.

What advice would you give to a health economist conducting an economic evaluation alongside a multinational study?

For a health economist conducting an economic evaluation alongside a multinational trial, it is important to plan ahead and understand the challenges that are associated with economic evaluations alongside multinational studies. A lot of the problems such as those related to the identification of unit costs can be avoided by ensuring adequate measures are put in place at the design stage of the study. An understanding of the various health systems of the countries involved in the study is important in order to make a judgement about the differences and similarities in resource use across countries. Decision makers are interested in results that can be applied to their jurisdiction; therefore it is important to adopt transparent methods e.g. state the countries that participated in the study, state the sources of unit costs and make it clear whether data from all countries (pooling) or from a subset (splitting) were used. To ensure that the results of the study are generalisable to a number of countries it may be advisable to present country-specific results and probably conduct the analysis from different perspectives.