Thesis Thursday: Francesco Longo

On the third Thursday of every month, we speak to a recent graduate about their thesis and their studies. This month’s guest is Dr Francesco Longo who has a PhD from the University of York. If you would like to suggest a candidate for an upcoming Thesis Thursday, get in touch.

Title
Essays on hospital performance in England
Supervisor
Luigi Siciliani
Repository link
http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/18975/

What do you mean by ‘hospital performance’, and how is it measured?

The concept of performance in the healthcare sector covers a number of dimensions including responsiveness, affordability, accessibility, quality, and efficiency. A PhD does not normally provide enough time to investigate all these aspects and, hence, my thesis mostly focuses on quality and efficiency in the hospital sector. The concept of quality or efficiency of a hospital is also surprisingly broad and, as a consequence, perfect quality and efficiency measures do not exist. For example, mortality and readmissions are good clinical quality measures but the majority of hospital patients do not die and are not readmitted. How well does the hospital treat these patients? Similarly for efficiency: knowing that a hospital is more efficient because it now has lower costs is essential, but how is that hospital actually reducing costs? My thesis tries to answer also these questions by analysing various quality and efficiency indicators. For example, Chapter 3 uses quality measures such as overall and condition-specific mortality, overall readmissions, and patient-reported outcomes for hip replacement. It also uses efficiency indicators such as bed occupancy, cancelled elective operations, and cost indexes. Chapter 4 analyses additional efficiency indicators, such as admissions per bed, the proportion of day cases, and proportion of untouched meals.

You dedicated a lot of effort to comparing specialist and general hospitals. Why is this important?

The first part of my thesis focuses on specialisation, i.e. an organisational form which is supposed to generate greater efficiency, quality, and responsiveness but not necessarily lower costs. Some evidence from the US suggests that orthopaedic and surgical hospitals had 20 percent higher inpatient costs because of, for example, higher staffing levels and better quality of care. In the English NHS, specialist hospitals play an important role because they deliver high proportions of specialised services, commonly low-volume but high-cost treatments for patients with complex and rare conditions. Specialist hospitals, therefore, allow the achievement of a critical mass of clinical expertise to ensure patients receive specialised treatments that produce better health outcomes. More precisely, my thesis focuses on specialist orthopaedic hospitals which, for instance, provide 90% of bone and soft tissue sarcomas surgeries, and 50% of scoliosis treatments. It is therefore important to investigate the financial viability of specialist orthopaedic hospitals relative to general hospitals that undertake similar activities, under the current payment system. The thesis implements weighted least square regressions to compare profit margins between specialist and general hospitals. Specialist orthopaedic hospitals are found to have lower profit margins, which are explained by patient characteristics such as age and severity. This means that, under the current payment system, providers that generally attract more complex patients such as specialist orthopaedic hospitals may be financially disadvantaged.

In what way is your analysis of competition in the NHS distinct from that of previous studies?

The second part of my thesis investigates the effect of competition on quality and efficiency under two different perspectives. First, it explores whether under competitive pressures neighbouring hospitals strategically interact in quality and efficiency, i.e. whether a hospital’s quality and efficiency respond to neighbouring hospitals’ quality and efficiency. Previous studies on English hospitals analyse strategic interactions only in quality and they employ cross-sectional spatial econometric models. Instead, my thesis uses panel spatial econometric models and a cross-sectional IV model in order to make causal statements about the existence of strategic interactions among rival hospitals. Second, the thesis examines the direct effect of hospital competition on efficiency. The previous empirical literature has studied this topic by focusing on two measures of efficiency such as unit costs and length of stay measured at the aggregate level or for a specific procedure (hip and knee replacement). My thesis provides a richer analysis by examining a wider range of efficiency dimensions. It combines a difference-in-difference strategy, commonly used in the literature, with Seemingly Unrelated Regression models to estimate the effect of competition on efficiency and enhance the precision of the estimates. Moreover, the thesis tests whether the effect of competition varies for more or less efficient hospitals using an unconditional quantile regression approach.

Where should researchers turn next to help policymakers understand hospital performance?

Hospitals are complex organisations and the idea of performance within this context is multifaceted. Even when we focus on a single performance dimension such as quality or efficiency, it is difficult to identify a measure that could work as a comprehensive proxy. It is therefore important to decompose as much as possible the analysis by exploring indicators capturing complementary aspects of the performance dimension of interest. This practice is likely to generate findings that are readily interpretable by policymakers. For instance, some results from my thesis suggest that hospital competition improves efficiency by reducing admissions per bed. Such an effect is driven by a reduction in the number of beds rather than an increase in the number of admissions. In addition, competition improves efficiency by pushing hospitals to increase the proportion of day cases. These findings may help to explain why other studies in the literature find that competition decreases length of stay: hospitals may replace elective patients, who occupy hospital beds for one or more nights, with day case patients, who are instead likely to be discharged the same day of admission.

Method of the month: Q methodology

Once a month we discuss a particular research method that may be of interest to people working in health economics. We’ll consider widely used key methodologies, as well as more novel approaches. Our reviews are not designed to be comprehensive but provide an introduction to the method, its underlying principles, some applied examples, and where to find out more. If you’d like to write a post for this series, get in touch. This month’s method is Q methodology.

Principles

There are many situations when we might be interested in people’s views, opinions or beliefs about an issue, such as how we allocate health care resources or the type of care we provide to dementia patients. Typically, health economists may think about using qualitative methods or preference elicitation techniques, but Q methodology could be your new method to examine these questions. Q methodology combines qualitative and quantitative techniques which allow us to first identify the range of the views that exist on a topic and then describe in-depth those viewpoints.

Q methodology was conceived as a way to study subjectivity by William Stephenson and is detailed in his 1953 book The Study of Behaviour. A more widely available book by Watts and Stenner (2012) provides a great general introduction to all stages of a Q study and the paper by Baker et al (2006) introduces Q methodology in health economics.

Implementation

There are two main stages in a Q methodology study. In the first stage, participants express their views through the rank-ordering of a set of statements known as the Q sort. The second stage uses factor analysis to identify patterns of similarity between the Q sorts, which can then be described in detail.

Stage 1: Developing the statements and Q sorting

The most important part of any Q study is the development of the statements that your participants will rank-order. The starting point is to identify all of the possible views on your topic. Participants should be able to interpret the statements as opinion rather than facts, for example, “The amount of health care people have had in the past should not influence access to treatments in the future”. The statements can come from a range of sources including interview transcripts, public consultations, academic literature, newspapers and social media. Through a process of eliminating duplicates, merging and deleting similar statements, you want to end up with a smaller set of statements that is representative of the population of views that exist on your topic. Pilot these statements in a small number of Q sorts before finalising and starting your main data collection.

The next thing to consider is from whom you are going to collect Q sorts. Participant sampling in Q methodology is similar to that of qualitative methods where you are looking to identify ‘data rich’ participants. It is not about representativeness according to demographics; instead, you want to include participants who have strong and differing views on your topic. Typically this would be around 30 to 60 people. Once you have selected your sample you can conduct your Q sorts. Here, each of your participants rank-orders the set of statements according to an instruction, for example from ‘most agree to most disagree’ or ‘highest priority to lowest priority’. At the end of each Q sort, a short interview is conducted asking participants to summarise their opinions on the Q sort and give further explanation for the placing of selected statements.

Stage 2: Analysis and interpretation

In the analysis stage, the aim is to identify people who have ranked their statements in a similar way. This involves calculating the correlations between the participants Q sorts (the full ranking of all statements) to form a correlation matrix which is then subject to factor analysis. The software outlined in the next section can help you with this. The factor analysis will produce a number of statistically significant solutions and your role as the analyst is to decide how many factors you retain for interpretation. This will be an iterative process where you consider the internal coherence of each factor: i.e. does the ranking of the statements make sense, does it align with the comments made by the participants following the Q sort as well as statistical considerations like Eigen Values. The factors are idealised Q sorts that are a complete ranking of all statements, essentially representing the way a respondent who had a correlation coefficient of 1 with the factor would have ranked their statements. The final step is to provide a descriptive account of the factors, looking at the positioning of each statement in relation to the other statements and drawing on the post Q sort interviews to support and aid your interpretation.

Software

There are a small number of software packages available to analyse your Q data, most of which are free to use. The most widely used programme is PQMethod. It is a DOS-based programme which often causes nervousness for newcomers due to the old school black screen and the requirement to step away from the mouse, but it is actually easy to navigate when you get going and it produces all of the output you need to interpret your Q sorts. There is the newer (and also free) KenQ that is receiving good reviews and has a more up-to-date web-based navigation, but I must confess I like my old time PQMethod. Details on all of the software and where to access these can be found on the Q methodology website.

Applications

Q methodology studies have been conducted with patient groups and the general public. In patient groups, the aim is often to understand their views on the type of care they receive or options for future care. Examples include the views of young people on the transition from paediatric to adult health care services and the views of dementia patients and their carers on good end of life care. The results of these types of Q studies have been used to inform the design of new interventions or to provide attributes for future preference elicitation studies.

We have also used Q methodology to investigate the views of the general public in a range of European countries on the principles that should underlie health care resource allocation as part of the EuroVaQ project. More recently, Q methodology has been used to identify societal views on the provision of life-extending treatments for people with a terminal illness.  This programme of work highlighted three viewpoints and a connected survey found that there was not one dominant viewpoint. This may help to explain why – after a number of preference elicitation studies in this area – we still cannot provide a definitive answer on whether an end of life premium exists. The survey mentioned in the end of life work refers to the Q2S (Q to survey) approach, which is a linked method to Q methodology… but that is for another blog post!

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Thesis Thursday: a guide to sources

Despite our best efforts, we’ve ended up without a guest for Thesis Thursday this month. Rather than try and let the January 2018 edition slide by unnoticed, I thought I should take the opportunity to write something a bit different on the subject.

The premise for Thesis Thursday is that there’s lots of exciting research going on around the world by early career researchers as part of doctoral programmes. One of the reasons we think Thesis Thursday is useful (as well as providing insight into the lives of health economics PhD students) is that it exposes readers to research that they might not otherwise get to see until after a long drawn-out publication process or, worse, that might never see the light of day at all.

In this blog post I’ll provide some insight into how we find candidates for Thesis Thursday and how you – between instalments – can get your thesis fix. Or, more likely, how you might be able to use PhD theses more in your research.

The big databases

There are some major repositories around the world for doctoral theses. If you’re looking for a thesis from a British university then your first stop should be EThOS, hosted by the British Library. The search function will be familiar to anyone who has used a bibliographic database. You can also limit your searches by award year and whether or not the thesis is available for immediate download (more on this in a moment).

A good resource for North American theses (and dissertations) is ProQuest, though it’s unfortunately only available to those with a subscription – institutional or otherwise. There is a health economics subject page with a weak collection of 72 theses (none more recent than 2012). But if you dig deeper using search terms you will find a wealth of PhD outputs from universities you’ve never even heard of. The quality is variable, but there are some excellent pieces of work buried in here. We’ll be trying to publicise them using Thesis Thursday.

There are plenty of other databases that bring together theses from multiple sources; these are simply the databases that I use. Honourable mentions also go to Open Access Theses and Dissertations and the NDLTD archive, which seem to have a better international reach than many others.

Institutional repositories

Most universities have their own internal thesis repositories. Most British universities use the standard EPrints system, so their use is familiar. While I’m reluctant to reinforce the Sheffield-York axis of power, the White Rose thesis repository is particularly useful for health economics theses. It’s a doddle to find the latest theses from ScHARR, CHE, and AUHE, though I’m not entirely convinced that they have complete coverage. Further afield in Europe, Erasmus has a good repository of health economics theses. Or, if you’ve been practising your Dutch, you can find a larger repository that includes the likes of Tilburg and Groningen.

Most theses in institutional repositories are embargoed. This means that it isn’t possible to download the thesis unless you make a special request and are granted permission. These theses aren’t likely to be chosen to be featured on the blog because they pose the additional challenge of trying to get sight of the work itself. I wish everybody would make their thesis freely accessible…

A call for candidates

Today’s Thesis Thursday didn’t happen because we weren’t able to find a guest who felt able to contribute. Recent graduates can be hard to track down. Email addresses stop working and subsequent affiliations (if any) are not always clear. If you would like to feature in an upcoming Thesis Thursday or you’d like to recommend someone, get in touch. We shan’t hold it against you if your thesis is not available online, but please be ready with your PDF!

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