Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 13th January 2020

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

A vision ‘bolt-on’ increases the responsiveness of EQ-5D: preliminary evidence from a study of cataract surgery. The European Journal of Health Economics [PubMed] Published 4th January 2020

The EQ-5D is insensitive to differences in how well people can see, despite this seeming to be an important aspect of health. In contexts where the impact of visual impairment may be important, we could potentially use a ‘bolt-on’ item that asks about a person’s vision. I’m working on the development of a vision bolt-on at the moment. But ours won’t be the first. A previously-developed bolt-on has undergone some testing and has been shown to be sensitive to differences between people with different levels of visual function. However, there is little or no evidence to support its responsiveness to changes in visual function, which might arise from treatment.

For this study, 63 individuals were recruited prior to receiving cataract surgery in Singapore. Participants completed the EQ-5D-3L and EQ-5D-5L, both with and without a vision bolt-on, which matched the wording of other EQ-5D dimensions. Additionally, the SF-6D, HUI3, and VF-12 were completed along with a LogMAR assessment of visual acuity. The authors sought to compare the responsiveness of the EQ-5D with a vision bolt-on compared with the standard EQ-5D and the other measures. Therefore, all measures were completed before and after cataract surgery. Preference weights can be generated for the EQ-5D-3L with a vision bolt-on, but they can’t for the EQ-5D-5L, so the authors looked at rescaled sum scores to compare across all measures. Responsiveness was measured using indicators such as standardised effect size and response mean.

Visual acuity changed dramatically before and after surgery, for almost everybody. The authors found that the vision bolt-on does seem to provide a great deal more in the way of response to this, compared to the EQ-5D without the bolt-on. For instance, the mean change in the EQ-5D-3L index score was 0.018 without the vision bolt-on, and 0.031 with it. The HUI3 came out with a mean change of 0.105 and showed the highest responsiveness across all analyses.

Does this mean that we should all be using a vision bolt-on, or perhaps the HUI3? Not exactly. Something I see a lot in papers of this sort – including in this one – is the framing of a “superior responsiveness” as an indication that the measure is doing a better job. That isn’t true if the measure is responding to things to which we don’t want it to respond. As the authors point out, the HUI3 has quite different foundations to the EQ-5D. We also don’t want a situation where analysts can pick and choose measures according to which ever is most responsive to the thing to which they want it to be most responsive. In EuroQol parlance, what goes into the descriptive system is very important.

The causal effect of social activities on cognition: evidence from 20 European countries. Social Science & Medicine Published 9th January 2020

Plenty of studies have shown that cognitive abilities are correlated with social engagement, but few have attempted to demonstrate causality in a large sample. The challenge, of course, is that people who engage in more social activities are likely to have greater cognitive abilities for other reasons, and people’s decision to engage in social activities might depend on their cognitive abilities. This study tackles the question of causality using a novel (to me, at least) methodology.

The analysis uses data from five waves of SHARE (the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe). Survey respondents are asked about whether they engage in a variety of social activities, such as voluntary work, training, sports, or community-related organisations. From this, the authors generate an indicator for people participating in zero, one, or two or more of these activities. The survey also uses a set of tests to measure people’s cognitive abilities in terms of immediate recall capacity, delayed recall capacity, fluency, and numeracy. The authors look at each of these four outcomes, with 231,407 observations for the first three and 124,381 for numeracy (for which the questions were missing from some waves). Confirming previous findings, a strong positive correlation is found between engagement in social activities and each of the cognition indicators.

The empirical strategy, which I had never heard of, is partial identification. This is a non-parametric method that identifies bounds for the average treatment effect. Thus, it is ‘partial’ because it doesn’t identify a point estimate. Fewer assumptions means wider and less informative bounds. The authors start with a model with no assumptions, for which the lower bound for the treatment effect goes below zero. They then incrementally add assumptions. These include i) a monotone treatment response, assuming that social participation does not reduce cognitive abilities on average; ii) monotone treatment selection, assuming that people who choose to be socially active tend to have higher cognitive capacities; iii) a monotone instrumental variable assumption that body mass index is negatively associated with cognitive abilities. The authors argue that their methodology is not likely to be undermined by unobservables, as previous studies might.

The various models show that engaging in social activities has a positive impact on all four of the cognitive indicators. The assumption of monotone treatment response had the highest identifying power. For all models that included this, the 95% confidence intervals in the estimates showed a statistically significant positive impact of social activities on cognition. What is perhaps most interesting about this approach is the huge amount of uncertainty in the estimates. Social activities might have a huge effect on cognition or they might have a tiny effect. A basic OLS-type model, assuming exogenous selection, provides very narrow confidence intervals, whereas the confidence intervals on the partial identification models are almost as wide as the lower and upper band themselves.

One shortcoming of this study for me is that it doesn’t seek to identify the causal channels that have been proposed in previous literature (e.g. loneliness, physical activity, self-care). So it’s difficult to paint a clear picture of what’s going on. But then, maybe that’s the point.

Do research groups align on an intervention’s value? Concordance of cost-effectiveness findings between the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review and other health system stakeholders. Applied Health Economics and Health Policy [PubMed] Published 10th January 2020

Aside from having the most inconvenient name imaginable, ICER has been a welcome edition to the US health policy scene, appraising health technologies in order to provide guidance on coverage. ICER has become influential, with some pharmacy benefit managers using their assessments as a basis for denying coverage for low value medicines. ICER identify technologies as falling in one of three categories – high, low, or intermediate long-term value – according to whether the ICER (grr) falls below, above, or between the threshold range of $50,000-$175,000 per QALY. ICER conduct their own evaluations, but so do plenty of other people. This study sought to find out whether other analyses in the literature agree with ICER’s categorisations.

The authors consider 18 assessments by ICER, including 76 interventions, between 2015 and 2017. For each of these, the authors searched the literature for other comparative studies. Specifically, they went looking for cost-effectiveness analyses that employed the same perspectives and outcomes. Unfortunately, they were only able to identify studies for six disease areas and 14 interventions (of the 76), across 25 studies. It isn’t clear whether this is because there is a lack of literature out there – which would be an interesting finding in itself – or because their search strategy or selection criteria weren’t up to scratch. Of the 14 interventions compared, 10 get a more favourable assessment in the published studies than in their corresponding ICER evaluations, with most being categorised as intermediate value instead of low value. The authors go on to conduct one case study, comparing an ICER evaluation in the context of migraine with a published study by some of the authors of this paper. There were methodological differences. In some respects, it seems as if ICER did a more thorough job, while in other respects the published study seemed to use more defensible assumptions.

I agree with the authors that these kinds of comparisons are important. Not least, we need to be sure that ICER’s approach to appraisal is valid. The findings of this study suggest that maybe ICER should be looking at multiple studies and combining all available data in a more meaningful way. But the authors excluded too many studies. Some imperfect comparisons would have been more useful than exclusion – 14 of 76 is kind of pitiful and probably not representative. And I’m not sure why the authors set out to identify studies that are ‘more favourable’, rather than just different. That perspective seems to reveal an assumption that ICER are unduly harsh in their assessments.

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Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 14th October 2019

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Transparency in health economic modeling: options, issues and potential solutions. PharmacoEconomics [PubMed] Published 8th October 2019

Reading this paper was a strange experience. The purpose of the paper, and its content, is much the same as a paper of my own, which was published in the same journal a few months ago.

The authors outline what they see as the options for transparency in the context of decision modelling, with a focus on open source models and a focus on for whom the details are transparent. Models might be transparent to a small number of researchers (e.g. in peer review), to HTA agencies, or to the public at large. The paper includes a figure showing the two aspects of transparency, termed ‘reach’ and ‘level’, which relate to the number of people who can access the information and the level of detail made available. We provided a similar figure in our paper, using the terms ‘breadth’ and ‘depth’, which is at least some validation of our idea. The authors then go on to discuss five ‘issues’ with transparency: copyright, model misuse, confidential data, software, and time/resources. These issues are framed as questions, to which the authors posit some answers as solutions.

Perhaps inevitably, I think our paper does a better job, and so I’m probably over-critical of this article. Ours is more comprehensive, if nothing else. But I also think the authors make a few missteps. There’s a focus on models created by academic researchers, which oversimplifies the discussion somewhat. Open source modelling is framed as a more complete solution than it really is. The ‘issues’ that are discussed are at points framed as drawbacks or negative features of transparency, which they aren’t. Certainly, they’re challenges, but they aren’t reasons not to pursue transparency. ‘Copyright’ seems to be used as a synonym for intellectual property, and transparency is considered to be a threat to this. The authors’ proposed solution here is to use licensing fees. I think that’s a bad idea. Levying a fee creates an incentive to disregard copyright, not respect it.

It’s a little ironic that both this paper and my own were published, when both describe the benefits of transparency in terms of reducing “duplication of efforts”. No doubt, I read this paper with a far more critical eye than I normally would. Had I not published a paper on precisely the same subject, I might’ve thought this paper was brilliant.

If we recognize heterogeneity of treatment effect can we lessen waste? Journal of Comparative Effectiveness Research [PubMed] Published 1st October 2019

This commentary starts from the premise that a pervasive overuse of resources creates a lot of waste in health care, which I guess might be true in the US. Apparently, this is because clinicians have an insufficient understanding of heterogeneity in treatment effects and therefore assume average treatment effects for their patients. The authors suggest that this situation is reinforced by clinical trial publications tending to only report average treatment effects. I’m not sure whether the authors are arguing that clinicians are too knowledgable and dependent on the research, or that they don’t know the research well enough. Either way, it isn’t a very satisfying explanation of the overuse of health care. Certainly, patients could benefit from more personalised care, and I would support the authors’ argument in favour of stratified studies and the reporting of subgroup treatment effects. The most insightful part of this paper is the argument that these stratifications should be on the basis of observable characteristics. It isn’t much use to your general practitioner if personalisation requires genome sequencing. In short, I agree with the authors’ argument that we should do more to recognise heterogeneity of treatment effects, but I’m not sure it has much to do with waste.

No evidence for a protective effect of education on mental health. Social Science & Medicine Published 3rd October 2019

When it comes to the determinants of health and well-being, I often think back to my MSc dissertation research. As part of that, I learned that a) stuff that you might imagine to be important often isn’t and b) methodological choices matter a lot. Though it wasn’t the purpose of my study, it seemed from this research that higher education has a negative effect on people’s subjective well-being. But there isn’t much research out there to help us understand the association between education and mental health in general.

This study add to a small body of literature on the impact of changes in compulsory schooling on mental health. In (West) Germany, education policy was determined at the state level, so when compulsory schooling was extended from eight to nine years, different states implemented the change at different times between 1949 and 1969. This study includes 5,321 people, with 20,290 person-year observations, from the German Socio-Economic Panel survey (SOEP). Inclusion was based on people being born seven years either side of the cutoff birth year for which the longer compulsory schooling was enacted, with a further restriction to people aged between 50 and 85. The SOEP includes the SF-12 questionnaire, which includes a mental health component score (MCS). There is also an 11-point life satisfaction scale. The authors use an instrumental variable approach, using the policy change as an instrument for years of schooling and estimating a standard two-stage least squares model. The MCS score, life satisfaction score, and a binary indicator for MCS score lower than or equal to 45.6, are all modelled as separate outcomes.

Estimates using an OLS model show a positive and highly significant effect of years of schooling on all three outcomes. But when the instrumental variable model is used, this effect disappears. An additional year of schooling in this model is associated with a statistically and clinically insignificant decrease in the MCS score. Also insignificant was the finding that more years of schooling increases the likelihood of developing symptoms of a mental health disorder (as indicated by the MCS threshold of 45.6) and that life satisfaction is slightly lower. The same model shows a positive effect on physical health, which corresponds with previous research and provides some reassurance that the model could detect an effect if one existed.

The specification of the model seems reasonable and a host of robustness checks are reported. The only potential issue I could spot is that a person’s state of residence at the time of schooling is not observed, and so their location at entry into the sample is used. Given that education is associated with mobility, this could be a problem, and I would have liked to see the authors subject it to more testing. The overall finding – that an additional year of school for people who might otherwise only stay at school for eight years does not improve mental health – is persuasive. But the extent to which we can say anything more general about the impact of education on well-being is limited. What if it had been three years of additional schooling, rather than one? There is still much work to be done in this area.

Scientific sinkhole: the pernicious price of formatting. PLoS One [PubMed] Published 26th September 2019

This study is based on a survey that asked 372 researchers from 41 countries about the time they spent formatting manuscripts for journal submission. Let’s see how I can frame this as health economics… Well, some of the participants are health researchers. The time they spend on formatting journal submissions is time not spent on health research. The opportunity cost of time spent formatting could be measured in terms of health.

The authors focused on the time and wage costs of formatting. The results showed that formatting took a median time of 52 hours per person per year, at a cost of $477 per manuscript or $1,908 per person per year. Researchers spend – on average – 14 hours on formatting a manuscript. That’s outrageous. I have never spent that long on formatting. If you do, you only have yourself to blame. Or maybe it’s just because of what I consider to constitute formatting. The survey asked respondents to consider formatting of figures, tables, and supplementary files. Improving the format of a figure or a table can add real value to a paper. A good figure or table can change a bad paper to a good paper. I’d love to know how the time cost differed for people using LaTeX.

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Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 20th May 2019

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

A new method to determine the optimal willingness to pay in cost-effectiveness analysis. Value in Health Published 17th May 2019

Efforts to identify a robust estimate of the willingness to pay for a QALY have floundered. Mostly, these efforts have relied on asking people about their willingness to pay. In the UK, we have moved away from using such estimates as a basis for setting cost-effectiveness thresholds in the context of resource allocation decisions. Instead, we have attempted to identify the opportunity cost of a QALY, which is perhaps even more difficult, but more easy to justify in the context of a fixed budget. This paper seeks to inject new life into the willingness-to-pay approach by developing a method based on relative risk aversion.

The author outlines the relationship between relative risk aversion and the rate at which willingness-to-pay changes with income. Various candidate utility functions are described with respect to risk preferences, with a Weibull function being adopted for this framework. Estimates of relative risk aversion have been derived from numerous data sources, including labour supply, lottery experiments, and happiness surveys. These estimates from the literature are used to demonstrate the relationship between relative risk aversion and the ‘optimal’ willingness to pay (K), calibrated using the Weibull utility function. For an individual with ‘representative’ parameters plugged into their utility function, K is around twice the income level. K always increases with relative risk aversion.

Various normative questions are raised, including whether a uniform K should be adopted for everybody within the population, and whether individuals should be able to spend on health care on top of public provision. This approach certainly appears to be more straightforward than other approaches to estimating willingness-to-pay in health care, and may be well-suited to decentralised (US-style) resource allocation decision-making. It’s difficult to see how this framework could gain traction in the UK, but it’s good to see alternative approaches being proposed and I hope to see this work developed further.

Striving for a societal perspective: a framework for economic evaluations when costs and effects fall on multiple sectors and decision makers. Applied Health Economics and Health Policy [PubMed] Published 16th May 2019

I’ve always been sceptical of a ‘societal perspective’ in economic evaluation, and I have written in favour of a limited health care perspective. This is mostly for practical reasons. Being sufficiently exhaustive to identify a truly ‘societal’ perspective is so difficult that, in attempting to do so, there is a very high chance that you will produce estimates that are so inaccurate and imprecise that they are more dangerous than useful. But the fact is that there is no single decision-maker when it comes to public expenditure. Governments are made up of various departments, within which there are many levels and divisions. Not everybody will care about the health care perspective, so other objectives ought to be taken into account.

The purpose of this paper is to build on the idea of the ‘impact inventory’, described by the Second Panel on Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine, which sought to address the challenge of multiple objectives. The extended framework described in this paper captures effects and opportunity costs associated with an intervention within various dimensions. These dimensions could (or should) align with decision-makers’ objectives. Trade-offs invariably require aggregation, and this aggregation could take place either within individuals or within dimensions – something not addressed by the Second Panel. The authors describe the implications of each approach to aggregation, providing visual representations of the impact inventory in each case. Aggregating within individuals requires a normative judgement about how each dimension is valued to the individual and then a judgement about how to aggregate for overall population net benefit. Aggregating across individuals within dimensions requires similar normative judgements. Where the chosen aggregation functions are linear and additive, both approaches will give the same results. But as soon as we start to consider equity concerns or more complex aggregation, we’ll see different decisions being indicated.

The authors adopt an example used by the Second Panel to demonstrate the decisions that would be made within a health-only perspective and then decisions that consider other dimensions. There could be a simple extension beyond health, such as including the impact on individuals’ consumption of other goods. Or it could be more complex, incorporating multiple dimensions, sectors, and decision-makers. For the more complex situation, the authors consider the inclusion of the criminal justice sector, introducing the number of crimes averted as an object of value.

It’s useful to think about the limitations of the Second Panel’s framing of the impact inventory and to make explicit the normative judgements involved. What this paper seems to be saying is that cross-sector decision-making is too complex to be adequately addressed by the Second Panel’s impact inventory. The framework described in this paper may be too abstract to be practically useful, and too vague to be foundational. But the complexities and challenges in multi-sector economic evaluation need to be spelt out – there is no simple solution.

Advanced data visualisation in health economics and outcomes research: opportunities and challenges. Applied Health Economics and Health Policy [PubMed] Published 4th May 2019

Computers can make your research findings look cool, which can help make people pay attention. But data visualisation can also be used as part of the research process and provide a means of more intuitively (and accurately) communicating research findings. The data sets used by health economists are getting bigger, which provides more opportunity and need for effective visualisation. The authors of this paper suggest that data visualisation techniques could be more widely adopted in our field, but that there are challenges and potential pitfalls to consider.

Decision modelling is an obvious context in which to use data visualisation, because models tend to involve large numbers of simulations. Dynamic visualisations can provide a means by which to better understand what is going on in these simulations, particularly with respect to uncertainty in estimates associated with alternative model structures or parameters. If paired with interactive models and customised dashboards, visualisation can make complex models accessible to non-expert users. Communicating patient outcomes data is also highlighted as a potential application, aiding the characterisation of differences between groups of individuals and alternative outcome measures.

Yet, there are barriers to wider use of visualisation. There is some scepticism about bias in underlying analyses, and end users don’t want to be bamboozled by snazzy graphics. The fact that journal articles are still the primary mode of communicating research findings is a problem, as you can’t have dynamic visualisations in a PDF. There’s also a learning curve for analysts wishing to develop complex visualisations. Hopefully, opportunities will be identified for two-way learning between the health economics world and data scientists more accustomed to data visualisation.

The authors provide several examples (static in the publication, but with links to live tools), to demonstrate the types of visualisations that can be created. Generally speaking, complex visualisations are proposed as complements to our traditional presentations of results, such as cost-effectiveness acceptability curves, rather than as alternatives. The key thing is to maintain credibility by ensuring that data visualisation is used to describe data in a more accurate and meaningful way, and to avoid exaggeration of research findings. It probably won’t be long until we see a set of good practice guidelines being developed for our field.

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