Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 30th September 2019

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

A need for change! A coding framework for improving transparency in decision modeling. PharmacoEconomics [PubMed] Published 24th September 2019

We’ve featured a few papers in recent round-ups that (I assume) will be included in an upcoming themed issue of PharmacoEconomics on transparency in modelling. It’s shaping up to be a good one. The value of transparency in decision modelling has been recognised, but simply making the stuff visible is not enough – it needs to make sense. The purpose of this paper is to help make that achievable.

The authors highlight that the writing of analyses, including coding, involves personal style and preferences. To aid transparency, we need a systematic framework of conventions that make the inner workings of a model understandable to any (expert) user. The paper describes a framework developed by the Decision Analysis in R for Technologies in Health (DARTH) group. The DARTH framework builds on a set of core model components, generalisable to all cost-effectiveness analyses and model structures. There are five components – i) model inputs, ii) model implementation, iii) model calibration, iv) model validation, and v) analysis – and the paper describes the role of each. Importantly, the analysis component can be divided into several parts relating to, for example, sensitivity analyses and value of information analyses.

Based on this framework, the authors provide recommendations for organising and naming files and on the types of functions and data structures required. The recommendations build on conventions established in other fields and in the use of R generally. The authors recommend the implementation of functions in R, and relate general recommendations to the context of decision modelling. We’re also introduced to unit testing, which will be unfamiliar to most Excel modellers but which can be relatively easily implemented in R. The role of various tools are introduced, including R Studio, R Markdown, Shiny, and GitHub.

The real value of this work lies in the linked R packages and other online material, which you can use to test out the framework and consider its application to whatever modelling problem you might have. The authors provide an example using a basic Sick-Sicker model, which you can have a play with using the DARTH packages. In combination with the online resources, this is a valuable paper that you should have to hand if you’re developing a model in R.

Accounts from developers of generic health state utility instruments explain why they produce different QALYs: a qualitative study. Social Science & Medicine [PubMed] Published 19th September 2019

It’s well known that different preference-based measures of health will generate different health state utility values for the same person. Yet, they continue to be used almost interchangeably. For this study, the authors spoke to people involved in the development of six popular measures: QWB, 15D, HUI, EQ-5D, SF-6D, and AQoL. Their goal was to understand the bases for the development of the measures and to explain why the different measures should give different results.

At least one original developer for each instrument was recruited, along with people involved at later stages of development. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 people, with questions on the background, aims, and criteria for the development of the measure, and on the descriptive system, preference weights, performance, and future development of the instrument.

Five broad topics were identified as being associated with differences in the measures: i) knowledge sources used for conceptualisation, ii) development purposes, iii) interpretations of what makes a ‘good’ instrument, iv) choice of valuation techniques, and v) the context for the development process. The online appendices provide some useful tables that summarise the differences between the measures. The authors distinguish between measures based on ‘objective’ definitions (QWB) and items that people found important (15D). Some prioritised sensitivity (AQoL, 15D), others prioritised validity (HUI, QWB), and several focused on pragmatism (SF-6D, HUI, 15D, EQ-5D). Some instruments had modest goals and opportunistic processes (EQ-5D, SF-6D, HUI), while others had grand goals and purposeful processes (QWB, 15D, AQoL). The use of some measures (EQ-5D, HUI) extended far beyond what the original developers had anticipated. In short, different measures were developed with quite different concepts and purposes in mind, so it’s no surprise that they give different results.

This paper provides some interesting accounts and views on the process of instrument development. It might prove most useful in understanding different measures’ blind spots, which can inform the selection of measures in research, as well as future development priorities.

The emerging social science literature on health technology assessment: a narrative review. Value in Health Published 16th September 2019

Health economics provides a good example of multidisciplinarity, with economists, statisticians, medics, epidemiologists, and plenty of others working together to inform health technology assessment. But I still don’t understand what sociologists are talking about half of the time. Yet, it seems that sociologists and political scientists are busy working on the big questions in HTA, as demonstrated by this paper’s 120 references. So, what are they up to?

This article reports on a narrative review, based on 41 empirical studies. Three broad research themes are identified: i) what drove the establishment and design of HTA bodies? ii) what has been the influence of HTA? and iii) what have been the social and political influences on HTA decisions? Some have argued that HTA is inevitable, while others have argued that there are alternative arrangements. Either way, no two systems are the same and it is not easy to explain differences. It’s important to understand HTA in the context of other social tendencies and trends, and that HTA influences and is influenced by these. The authors provide a substantial discussion on the role of stakeholders in HTA and the potential for some to attempt to game the system. Uncertainty abounds in HTA and this necessarily requires negotiation and acts as a limit on the extent to which HTA can rely on objectivity and rationality.

Something lacking is a critical history of HTA as a discipline and the question of what HTA is actually good for. There’s also not a lot of work out there on culture and values, which contrasts with medical sociology. The authors suggest that sociologists and political scientists could be more closely involved in HTA research projects. I suspect that such a move would be more challenging for the economists than for the sociologists.

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Sam Watson’s journal round-up for 24th July 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Ten years after the financial crisis: the long reach of austerity and its global impacts on health. Social Science & Medicine [PubMedPublished 22nd June 2017

The subject of austerity and its impact on health has generated its own subgenre in the academic literature. We have covered a number of papers on these journal round-ups on this topic, which, given the nature of economic papers, are generally quantitative in nature. However, while quantitative studies are necessary for generation of knowledge of the social world, they are not sufficient. At aggregate levels, quantitative studies may often rely on a black box approach. We may reasonably conclude a policy caused a change in some population-level indicator on the basis of a causal inference type paper, but we often need other types of evidence to answer why or how this occurred. A realist philosophy of social science may see this as a process of triangulation; at the very least it’s a process of abduction to develop theory that best explains what we observe. In clinical research, Bradford-Hill’s famous criteria can be used as a heuristic for causal inference: a cause can be attributed to an effect if it demonstrates a number of criteria including dose-response and reproducibility. For social science, we can conceive of a similar set of criteria. Effects must follow causes, there has to be a plausible mechanism, and so forth. This article in Social Science & Medicine introduces a themed issue on austerity and its effects on health. The issue contains a number of papers examining experiences of people with respect to austerity and how these may translate into changes in health. One example is a study in a Mozambican hospital and how health outcomes change in response to continued restructuring programs due to budget shortfalls. Another study explores the narrative of austerity in Guyana and it has long been sold as necessary for future benefits which never actually materialise. It is not immediately clear how austerity is being defined here, but it is presumably something like ‘a fiscal contraction that causes a significant increase in aggregate unemployment‘. In any case, it makes for interesting reading and complements economics research on the topic. It is a refreshing change from the bizarre ravings we featured a couple of weeks ago!

Home-to-home time — measuring what matters to patients and payers. New England Journal of Medicine [PubMedPublished 6th July 2017

Length of hospital stay is often used as a metric to evaluate hospital performance: for a given severity of illness, a shorter length of hospital stay may suggest higher quality care. However, hospitals can of course game these metrics, and they are further complicated by survival bias. Hospitals are further incentivised to reduce length of stay. For example, the move from per diem reimbursement to per episode had the effect of dramatically reducing length of stay in hospitals. As a patient recovers, they may no longer need hospital based care, the care they require may be adequately provided in other institutional settings. Although, in the UK there has been a significant issue with many patients convalescing in hospital for extended periods as they wait for a place in residential care homes. Thus from the perspective of the whole health system, length of stay in hospital may no longer be the right metric to evaluate performance. This article makes this argument and provides some interesting statistics. For example, between 2004 and 2011 the average length of stay in hospital among Medicare beneficiaries in the US decreased from 6.3 to 5.7 days; post-acute care stays increased from 4.8 to 6.0 days. Thus, the total time in care actually increased from 11.1 to 11.7 days over this period. In the post-acute care setting, Medicare still reimburses providers on a per diem basis, so total payments adjusted for inflation also increased. This article makes the argument that we need to structure incentives and reimbursement schemes across the whole care system if we want to ensure efficiency and equity.

The population health benefits of a healthy lifestyle: life expectancy increased and onset of disability delayed. Health Affairs [PubMedPublished July 2017

Obesity and tobacco smoking increase the risk of ill health and in so doing reduce life expectancy. The same goes for alcohol, although the relationship between alcohol consumption and risk of illness is less well understood. One goal of public health policy is to mitigate these risks. One successful way of communicating the risks of different behaviours is as changes to life expectancy, or conversely ‘effective age‘. From a different perspective, understanding how different risk factors affect life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy is important for cost-benefit analyses of different public health interventions. This study estimates life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy associated with smoking, obesity, and moderate alcohol consumption using the US-based Health and Retirement Study. However, I struggle to see how this study adds much; while it communicates its results well, it is, in essence, a series of univariate comparisons followed by a multivariate comparison. This has been done widely before, such as here and here. Nevertheless, the results reinforce those previous studies. For example, obesity reduced disability-free life expectancy by 3 years for men and 6 years for women.

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Sam Watson’s journal round-up for 9th January 2017

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Non-separable time preferences, novelty consumption and body weight: Theory and evidence from the East German transition to capitalism. Journal of Health Economics [PubMed] [RePEc] Published January 2017

Obesity is an ever growing (excuse the pun) problem associated with numerous health risks including diabetes and hypertension. It was recently reported that eight in ten middle-aged Britons are overweight or exercise too little. A strong correlation between economic development and obesity rates has been widely observed both over time within the same countries and between countries across the world. One potential explanation for this correlation is innovation of novel food products that are often energy dense and of little nutritional benefit. However, exploring this hypothesis is difficult as over the long time horizons associated with changing consumer habits and economic development, a multitude of confounding factors also change. This paper attempts to delve into this question making use of the natural experiment of German reunification in 1989. After the fall of the Berlin Wall a wave of products previously available in West Germany became available to East Germans, almost overnight. The paper provides a nice in depth theoretical model, which is then linked to data and an empirical analysis to provide a comprehensive study of the effect of novel food products in both the short and medium terms. At first glance the effect of reunification on diet habits and weight gain appear fairly substantial both in absolute and relative terms, and these results appear robust and well-founded, theoretically speaking. A question that remains in my mind are whether preferences in this case are endogenous or state dependent, a question that has important implications for policy. Similarly, did reunification reveal East German preferences for fast food and the like, or were those preferences changed as a result of the significant cultural shift? Sadly, this last question is unanswerable, but affects whether we can interpret these results as causal – a thought I shall expand upon in an upcoming blog post.

Ontology, methodological individualism, and the foundations of the social sciences. Journal of Economic Literature [RePEc] Published December 2016

It is not often that we feature philosophically themed papers. But, I am a keen proponent of keeping abreast of advances in our understanding of what exactly it is we are doing day to day. Are we actually producing knowledge of the real world? This review essay discusses the book The Ant Trap by Brian Epstein. Epstein argues that social scientists must get the social ontology right in order to generate knowledge of the social world. A view I think it would be hard to disagree with. But, he argues, economists have not got the social ontology right. In particular, economists are of the belief that social facts are built out of individual people, much like an ant colony is built of ants (hence the title), when in fact a less anthropocentric view should be adopted. In this essay, Robert Sugden argues that Epstein’s arguments against ontological individualism – that social facts are reducible to the actions of individuals – are unconvincing, particularly given Epstein’s apparent lack of insight into what social scientists actually do. Epstein also developed an ontological model for social facts on the basis of work by John Searle, a model which Sugden finds to be overly ambitious and ultimately unsuccessful. There is not enough space here to flesh out any of the arguments, needless to say it is an interesting debate, and one which may or may not make a difference to the methods we use, depending on who you agree with.

Heterogeneity in smokers’ responses to tobacco control policies. Health Economics [PubMedPublished 4th January 2016

In an ideal world, public health policy with regards to drugs and alcohol would be designed to minimise harm. However, it is often the case that policy is concerned with reducing the prevalence of use, rather than harm. Prevalence reducing policies, such as a Pigouvian tax, reduce overall use but only among those with the most elastic demand, who are also likely to be those whose use leads to the least harm. In this light, this study assesses the heterogeneity of tobacco users’ responses to tobacco control policies. Using quantile regression techniques, Erik Nesson finds that the effects of tobacco taxes are most pronounced in those who consume lower numbers of cigarettes, as we might expect. This is certainly not the first study to look at this (e.g. here and here), but reproduction of research findings is an essential part of the scientific process, and this study certainly provides further robust evidence to show that taxes alone may not be the optimum harm reduction strategy.

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