Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 19th November 2018

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Valuation of health states considered to be worse than death—an analysis of composite time trade-off data from 5 EQ-5D-5L valuation studies. Value in Health Published 12th November 2018

I have a problem with the idea of health states being ‘worse than dead’, and I’ve banged on about it on this blog. Happily, this new article provides an opportunity for me to continue my campaign. Health state valuation methods estimate how much a person prefers being in a more healthy state. Positive values are easy to understand; 1.0 is twice as good as 0.5. But how about the negative values? Is -1.0 twice as bad as -0.5? How much worse than being dead is that? The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether or not negative EQ-5D-5L values meaningfully discriminate between different health states.

The study uses data from EQ-5D-5L valuation studies conducted in Singapore, the Netherlands, China, Thailand, and Canada. Altogether, more than 5000 people provided valuations of 10 states each. As a simple measure of severity, the authors summed the number of steps from full health in all domains, giving a value from 0 (11111) to 20 (55555). We’d expect this measure of severity of states to correlate strongly with the mean utility values derived from the composite time trade-off (TTO) exercise.

Taking Singapore as an example, the mean of positive values (states better than dead) decreased from 0.89 to 0.21 with increasing severity, which is reassuring. The mean of negative values, on the other hand, ranged from -0.98 to -0.89. Negative values were clustered between -0.5 and -1.0. Results were similar across the other countries. In all except Thailand, observed negative values were indistinguishable from random noise. There was no decreasing trend in mean utility values as severity increased for states worse than dead. A linear mixed model with participant-specific intercepts and an ANOVA model confirmed the findings.

What this means is that we can’t say much about states worse than dead except that they are worse than dead. How much worse doesn’t relate to severity, which is worrying if we’re using these values in trade-offs against states better than dead. Mostly, the authors frame this lack of discriminative ability as a practical problem, rather than anything more fundamental. The discussion section provides some interesting speculation, but my favourite part of the paper is an analogy, which I’ll be quoting in future: “it might be worse to be lost at sea in deep waters than in a pond, but not in any way that truly matters”. Dead is dead is dead.

Determining value in health technology assessment: stay the course or tack away? PharmacoEconomics [PubMed] Published 9th November 2018

The cost-per-QALY approach to value in health care is no stranger to assault. The majority of criticisms are ill-founded special pleading, but, sometimes, reasonable tweaks and alternatives have been proposed. The aim of this paper was to bring together a supergroup of health economists to review and discuss these reasonable alternatives. Specifically, the questions they sought to address were: i) what should health technology assessment achieve, and ii) what should be the approach to value-based pricing?

The paper provides an unstructured overview of a selection of possible adjustments or alternatives to the cost-per-QALY method. We’re very briefly introduced to QALY weighting, efficiency frontiers, and multi-criteria decision analysis. The authors don’t tell us why we ought (or ought not) to adopt these alternatives. I was hoping that the paper would provide tentative answers to the normative questions posed, but it doesn’t do that. It doesn’t even outline the thought processes required to answer them.

The purpose of this paper seems to be to argue that alternative approaches aren’t sufficiently developed to replace the cost-per-QALY approach. But it’s hardly a strong defence. I’m a big fan of the cost-per-QALY as a necessary (if not sufficient) part of decision making in health care, and I agree with the authors that the alternatives are lacking in support. But the lack of conviction in this paper scares me. It’s tempting to make a comparison between the EU and the QALY.

How can we evaluate the cost-effectiveness of health system strengthening? A typology and illustrations. Social Science & Medicine [PubMed] Published 3rd November 2018

Health care is more than the sum of its parts. This is particularly evident in low- and middle-income countries that might lack strong health systems and which therefore can’t benefit from a new intervention in the way a strong system could. Thus, there is value in health system strengthening. But, as the authors of this paper point out, this value can be difficult to identify. The purpose of this study is to provide new methods to model the impact of health system strengthening in order to support investment decisions in this context.

The authors introduce standard cost-effectiveness analysis and economies of scope as relevant pieces of the puzzle. In essence, this paper is trying to marry the two. An intervention is more likely to be cost-effective if it helps to provide economies of scope, either by making use of an underused platform or providing a new platform that would improve the cost-effectiveness of other interventions. The authors provide a typology with three types of health system strengthening: i) investing in platform efficiency, ii) investing in platform capacity, and iii) investing in new platforms. Examples are provided for each. Simple mathematical approaches to evaluating these are described, using scaling factors and disaggregated cost and outcome constraints. Numerical demonstrations show how these approaches can reveal differences in cost-effectiveness that arise through changes in technical efficiency or the opportunity cost linked to health system strengthening.

This paper is written with international development investment decisions in mind, and in particular the challenge of investments that can mostly be characterised as health system strengthening. But it’s easy to see how many – perhaps all – health services are interdependent. If anything, the broader impact of new interventions on health systems should be considered as standard. The methods described in this paper provide a useful framework to tackle these issues, with food for thought for anybody engaged in cost-effectiveness analysis.

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Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 27th August 2018

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

Ethically acceptable compensation for living donations of organs, tissues, and cells: an unexploited potential? Applied Health Economics and Health Policy [PubMed] Published 25th August 2018

Around the world, there are shortages of organs for transplantation. In economics, the debate around the need to increase organ donation can be frustratingly ignorant of ethical and distributional concerns. So it’s refreshing to see this article attempting to square concerns about efficiency and equity. The authors do so by using a ‘spheres of justice’ framework. This is the idea that different social goods should be distributed according to different principles. So, while we might be happy for brocolli and iPhones to be distributed on the basis of free exchange, we might want health to be distributed on the basis of need. The argument can be extended to state that – for a just situation to prevail – certain exchanges between these spheres of justice (e.g. health for iPhones) should never take place. This idea might explain why – as the authors demonstrate with a review of European countries – policy tends not to allow monetary compensation for organ donation.

The paper cleverly sets out to taxonomise monetary and non-monetary reimbursement and compensation with reference to individuals’ incentives and the spheres of justice principles. From this, the authors reach two key conclusions. Firstly, that (monetary) reimbursement of donors’ expenses (e.g. travel costs or lost earnings) is ethically sound as this does not constitute an incentive to donate but rather removes existing disincentives. Secondly, that non-monetary compensation could be deemed ethical.

Three possible forms of non-monetary compensation are discussed: i) prioritisation, ii) free access, and iii) non-health care-related benefits. The first could involve being given priority for receiving organs, or it could extend to the jumping of other health care waiting lists. I think this is more problematic than the authors let on because it asserts that health care should – at least in part – be distributed according to desert rather than need. The second option – free access – could mean access to health care that people would otherwise have to pay for. The third option could involve access to other social goods such as education or housing.

This is an interesting article and an enjoyable read, but I don’t think it provides a complete solution. Maybe I’m just too much of a Marxist, but I think that this – as all other proposals – fails to distribute from each according to ability. That is, we’d still expect non-monetary compensation to incentivise poorer (and on average less healthy) people to donate organs, thus exacerbating health inequality. This is because i) poorer people are more likely to need the non-monetary benefits and ii) we live in a capitalist society in which there is almost nothing that money can’t by and which is strictly non-monetary. Show me a proposal that increases donation rates from those who can most afford to donate them (i.e. the rich and healthy).

Selecting bolt-on dimensions for the EQ-5D: examining their contribution to health-related quality of life. Value in Health Published 18th August 2018

Measures such as the EQ-5D are used to describe health-related quality of life as completely and generically as possible. But there is a trade-off between completeness and the length of the questionnaire. Necessarily, there are parts of the evaluative space that measures will not capture because they are a simplification. If the bit they’re missing is important to your patient group, that’s a problem. You might fancy a bolt-on. But how do we decide which areas of the evaluative space should be more completely included in the measure? Which bolt-ons should be used? This paper seeks to provide means of answering these questions.

The article builds on an earlier piece of work that was included in an earlier journal round-up. In the previous paper, the authors used factor analysis to identify candidate bolt-ons. The goal of this paper is to outline an approach for specifying which of these candidates ought to be used. Using data from the Multi-Instrument Comparison study, the authors fit linear regressions to see how well 37 candidate bolt-on items explain differences in health-related quality of life. The 37 items correspond to six different domains: energy/vitality, satisfaction, relationships, hearing, vision, and speech. In a second test, the authors explored whether the bolt-on candidates could explain differences in health-related quality of life associated with six chronic conditions. Health-related quality of life is defined according to a visual analogue scale, which notably does not correspond to that used in the EQ-5D but rather uses a broader measure of physical, mental, and social health.

The results suggest that items related to energy/vitality, relationships, and satisfaction explained a significant part of health-related quality of life on top of the existing EQ-5D dimensions. The implication is that these could be good candidates for bolt-ons. The analysis of the different conditions was less clear.

For me, there’s a fundamental problem with this study. It moves the goals posts. Bolt-ons are about improving the extent to which a measure can more accurately represent the evaluative space that it is designed to characterise. In this study, the authors use a broader definition of health-related quality of life that – as far as I can tell – the EQ-5D is not designed to capture. We’re not dealing with bolt-ons, we’re dealing with extensions to facilitate expansions to the evaluative space. Nevertheless, the method could prove useful if combined with a more thorough consideration of the evaluative space.

Sources of health financing and health outcomes: a panel data analysis. Health Economics [PubMed] [RePEc] Published 15th August 2018

There is a growing body of research looking at the impact that health (care) spending has on health outcomes. Usually, these studies don’t explicitly look at who is doing the spending. In this study, the author distinguishes between public and private spending and attempts to identify which type of spending (if either) results in greater health improvements.

The author uses data from the World Bank’s World Development Indicators for 1995-2014. Life expectancy at birth is adopted as the primary health outcome and the key expenditure variables are health expenditure as a share of GDP and private health expenditure as a share of total health expenditure. Controlling for a variety of other variables, including some determinants of health such as income and access to an improved water source, a triple difference analysis is described. The triple difference estimator corresponds to the difference in health outcomes arising from i) differences in the private expenditure level, given ii) differences in total expenditure, over iii) time.

The key finding from the study is that, on average, private expenditure is more effective in increasing life expectancy at birth than public expenditure. The author also looks at government effectiveness, which proves crucial. The finding in favour of private expenditure entirely disappears when only countries with effective government are considered. There is some evidence that public expenditure is more effective in these countries, and this is something that future research should investigate further. For countries with ineffective governments, the implication is that policy should be directed towards increasing overall health care expenditure by increasing private expenditure.

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Sam Watson’s journal round-up for 30th April 2018

Every Monday our authors provide a round-up of some of the most recently published peer reviewed articles from the field. We don’t cover everything, or even what’s most important – just a few papers that have interested the author. Visit our Resources page for links to more journals or follow the HealthEconBot. If you’d like to write one of our weekly journal round-ups, get in touch.

The Millennium Villages Project: a retrospective, observational, endline evaluation. The Lancet Global Health [PubMedPublished May 2018

There are some clinical researchers who would have you believe observational studies are completely useless. The clinical trial is king, they might say, observation studies are just too biased. And while it’s true that observational studies are difficult to do well and convincingly, they can be a reliable and powerful source of evidence. Similarly, randomised trials are frequently flawed, for example there’s often missing data that hasn’t been dealt with, or a lack of allocation concealment, and many researchers forget that randomisation does not guarantee a balance of covariates, it merely increases the probability of it. I bring this up, as this study is a particularly carefully designed observational data study that I think serves as a good example to other researchers. The paper is an evaluation of the Millennium Villages Project, an integrated intervention program designed to help rural villages across sub-Saharan Africa meet the Millennium Development Goals over ten years between 2005 and 2015. Initial before-after evaluations of the project were criticised for inferring causal “impacts” from before and after data (for example, this Lancet paper had to be corrected after some criticism). To address these concerns, this new paper is incredibly careful about choosing appropriate control villages against which to evaluate the intervention. Their method is too long to summarise here, but in essence they match intervention villages to other villages on the basis of district, agroecological zone, and a range of variables from the DHS – matches were they reviewed for face validity and revised until a satisfactory matching was complete. The wide range of outcomes are all scaled to a standard normal and made to “point” in the same direction, i.e. so an increase indicated economic development. Then, to avoid multiple comparisons problems, a Bayesian hierarchical model is used to pool data across countries and outcomes. Costs data were also reported. Even better, “statistical significance” is barely mentioned at all! All in all, a neat and convincing evaluation.

Reconsidering the income‐health relationship using distributional regression. Health Economics [PubMed] [RePEcPublished 19th April 2018

The relationship between health and income has long been of interest to health economists. But it is a complex relationship. Increases in income may change consumption behaviours and a change in the use of time, promoting health, while improvements to health may lead to increases in income. Similarly, people who are more likely to make higher incomes may also be those who look after themselves, or maybe not. Disentangling these various factors has generated a pretty sizeable literature, but almost all of the empirical papers in this area (and indeed all empirical papers in general) use modelling techniques to estimate the effect of something on the expected value, i.e. mean, of some outcome. But the rest of the distribution is of interest – the mean effect of income may not be very large, but a small increase in income for poorer individuals may have a relatively large effect on the risk of very poor health. This article looks at the relationship between income and the conditional distribution of health using something called “structured additive distribution regression” (SADR). My interpretation of SADR is that, one would model the outcome y ~ g(a,b) as being distributed according to some distribution g(.) indexed by parameters a and b, for example, a normal or Gamma distribution has two parameters. One would then specify a generalised linear model for a and b, e.g. a = f(X’B). I’m not sure this is a completely novel method, as people use the approach to, for example, model heteroscedasticity. But that’s not to detract from the paper itself. The findings are very interesting – increases to income have a much greater effect on health at the lower end of the spectrum.

Ask your doctor whether this product is right for you: a Bayesian joint model for patient drug requests and physician prescriptions. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series C Published April 2018.

When I used to take econometrics tutorials for undergraduates, one of the sessions involved going through coursework about the role of advertising. To set the scene, I would talk about the work of Alfred Marshall, the influential economist from the late 1800s/early 1900s. He described two roles for advertising: constructive and combative. The former is when advertising grows the market as a whole, increasing everyone’s revenues, and the latter is when ads just steal market share from rivals without changing the size of the market. Later economists would go on to thoroughly develop theories around advertising, exploring such things as the power of ads to distort preferences, the supply of ads and their complementarity with the product they’re selling, or seeing ads as a source of consumer information. Nevertheless, Marshall’s distinction is still a key consideration, although often phrased in different terms. This study examines a lot of things, but one of its key objectives is to explore the role of direct to consumer advertising on prescriptions of brands of drugs. The system is clearly complex: drug companies advertise both to consumers and physicians, consumers may request the drug from the physician, and the physician may or may not prescribe it. Further, there may be correlated unobservable differences between physicians and patients, and the choice to advertise to particular patients may not be exogenous. The paper does a pretty good job of dealing with each of these issues, but it is dense and took me a couple of reads to work out what was going on, especially with the mix of Bayesian and Frequentist terms. Examining the erectile dysfunction drug market, the authors reckon that direct to consumer advertising reduces drug requests across the category, while increasing the proportion of requests for the advertised drug – potentially suggesting a “combative” role. However, it’s more complex than that patient requests and doctor’s prescriptions seem to be influenced by a multitude of factors.

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